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Description:

A bi-weekly food exploration plus a guest. Each week features an ingredient, concept or issue relating to food and uncover origins, stories, artworks and innovations by looking at food, art, history and design and how, why and where they intersect.

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Podcast Episode's:
Ep22 - Bubbly: Champagne, Prosecco and Cava - 12 Foods of Christmas
<p>At Christmas-time and New Year we drink more of it than ever and it seems perfectly acceptable to be cracking open bottles of bubbly before noon or anytime you have guests round. It’s also the perfect gift to bring round, a ribbon tied round the iconic bottle. Bubbly is a great aperitif, can finish off a meal, be paired with liqueurs or drank on its own. Those bubbles can go straight to ones head…and what starts as giddiness…quickly moves into tipsiness…which is sure to end in headache if one too many glasses are enjoyed.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/reims_champas.jpg" alt="" width="487" height="640" /></p> <ul> <li>We have the Romans to thank for planting vineyards in the Champagne region of France.</li> <li>The roots of champagne being linked to big celebrations were when the first King of France, the warrior, Clovis was baptised and crowned in Reims Cathedral on Christmas day 496 AD and with Reims being in the province of Champagne it flowed freely to celebrate the coronation and from 898 onwards, all French kings were crowned in Reims.</li> <li>With their botanical gardens at hand and the focus and time to dedicate towards their efforts we have monks to thank for many world renowned gastric delights. These include cheeses, confectionaries, cordials and champagnes. For example Dom Perignon, one of the most famous champagne in the world, was started in the 17th century by monks.</li> <li>Marquis de Saint-Évremond brought and elevated champagne to London society whilst he was exiled there in 1661. Bubbles and champagne are synonymous now but it was after became popular in London that the bubbles would eventually become fixed. Up to then, the bubbles had sometimes appeared… and were more likely to appear in bottles that had been shipped to England and had had the fermentation process halted and started with changes in temperature which led to left over sugars which caused carbon dioxide gas to build and would cause the wine to bubble once opened.</li> <li>Once it was established how to ensure the bubbles in each and every bottle champagne really took off in popularity in the 18th c. and with the help and power of French champagne houses still familiar to us today such as Moët & Chandon, Louis Roederer, Piper-Heidsieck and Taittinger they established a product that would symbolise luxury, style and celebration throughout the world with the help of the Parisian artistic, creative and literary elite who were lapping up champagne and depicting it in their works and lifestyles.</li> </ul> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/giggle_water.jpg" alt= "" width="409" height="600" /></p> <ul> <li>In the 20th c. the champagne houses took these fashionable associations and created marketing campaigns that revived drinking champagne as a must have for all celebrations, with a focus on Christmas and New Years Eve.</li> <li>Champagne is obviously protected as an item produced only in Champagne but there are other 'bubbly alternatives at generally a lower price point such as Cava from Spain, Prosecco from Italy and sparkling wine from anywhere. Generally champagne is often described as yeasty and sweet with biscuit or brioche notes whole Cava can have earther tones and prosecco has descriptors of sweet and crisp.</li> <li>Prosecco is now taking over the bubbly game with everyone wanting to get in on sharing bottles with each other on nights out, get togethers, parties, pubs and certainly at Christmas and New Years. Prosecco is cheaper than champagne, more fashionable than cava and on the path to continue it’s rise in sales an popularity.</li> <li>This is the last episode of this first series of the Smy Goodness Podcast which will be back for a second series in March. In the meantime you can follow me on Instagram, Twitter or my website smygoodness.com. Happy New Year and thanks for listening.</li> </ul> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/dpadverts.jpg" alt="" width="566" height="321" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/gancia.jpg" alt="" width="300" height="429" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/sparkling_wine.jpg" alt="" width="302" height="426" /></p> <p>A few years back I decided to bundle all my interests together and rebrand from Smy Chutney to Smy Goodness so that all my preserves, crafts, products and workshops could live together in one place. My own podcast seemed a suitable place to uncover, understand and enjoy things related to food, art, history and design. Please do share your stories, knowledge, questions and suggestions. In the Smy Goodness.com podcast section you will find the podcasts and all the items that we are discussing and will have ongoing discussions about each week.</p> <p>You can also follow Smy Goodness on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr. I'd like to thank Ashley Palmer for use of his Roland R-09 and Matteo Borea for creating the music. Thank you for listening.</p>
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Ep21 - Christmas Chocolates - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p>This mini-episode is just a little taster, chocolate will get a FULL ON episode in the future, here we are just focusing on Christmas chocolates such as chocolate coins, chocolate tins and trays. From its roots in South and Central America cacao has created joy and good tidings everywhere it has gone and we love to gift it, share it and gorge on it at Christmas.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/lindt_choc.jpg" alt="" width="356" height="480" /></p> <ul> <li><a href= "https://yougov.co.uk/news/2017/12/13/ranked-best-christmas-chocolates/"> yougov.uk</a> did a really snazzy poll this year to find out which chocolates were the favourites from the Roses, Quality Street, Celebrations and Heroes Christmas tubs. Comments unanimously denounced the size and quality of the sweets, the plastic tub which has replaced the tins, the moment that Cadbury’s succumbed to Kraft, the fallen sweets of yesteryear which have been retired and my favourite comment from 1984again - “Anyone who likes chocolate would not eat any of this stuff. It's not chocolate anymore.”</li> <li>Milk chocolate was invented in 1876.</li> <li>Chocolate is made from the seeds of the cacao plant native to Central and South America and was vital to the Maya and Aztec who used a raw bitter cacao drink ceremoniously in wedding, battle and burial rituals. It was not consumed by all but reserved by the elite.</li> <li>From the cacao tree we get the seeds or nuts which result in raw cacao power when the cocoa beans are un-roasted and cold-pressed. Cocoa powder has been roasted under high heat.</li> <li>Raw cacao powder is full of antioxidants,contains protein, calcium, carotene, thiamin, riboflavin, magnesium, and sulfur. high in valuable enzymes, can reduce blood pressure and chances of cardiovascular disease, can raise serotonin levels.</li> <li>Spanish Explorer Cortez brought back a recipe and the necessary equipment and had experimented with adding heat to the mixture to make it more palatable.
</li> <li>Cacao was not an immediate success when it was introduced to Spain in the early 16th century… but once sugar was added to cocoa powder and served warm, it really took off and its benefits and its status as a drink of the wealthy and specifically a drink of Spain.</li> <li>Eventually warm cocoa spread to France and the rest of Europe and took over as a predecessor to tea and coffee-houses with wealthy men enjoying the custom of drinking hot cocoa at specific cafe-like houses where thy would discuss politics and current events.</li> <li>The industrial revolution  improved grinding process and introduced additives which brought down the cost of cocoa and widened the audience of those who would enjoy it.</li> <li>In 1847 the world saw it’s first chocolate bar as chocolate went from being a drink to an edible food.</li> <li>Chocolate shaped like coins, wrapped in gold foil given to children and put in stockings at Christmas and given to children during Chanukah. This tradition also has links to the tradition of St Nicholas gifting gold to the poor as told in the Twelve Foods of Christmas orange episode.</li> <li>Chocolate manufacturers soon found an opportunity in Christmas chocolate selections that they could sell high price offerings that were popular amongst families who they would provide with an array of chocolates.</li> </ul> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/lindt_vint.jpg" alt="" width="432" height="640" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/front_1904.jpg" alt="" width="305" height="434" /><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/cadbury_club.jpg" alt= "" width="303" height="430" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/quality_street.jpg" alt="" width="275" height="183" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/choc_coins.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="200" /></p> <p><span style= "border-radius: 2px; text-indent: 20px; width: auto; padding: 0px 4px 0px 0px; text-align: center; font: bold 11px/20px 'Helvetica Neue',Helvetica,sans-serif; color: #ffffff; background: #bd081c no-repeat scroll 3px 50% / 14px 14px; position: absolute; opacity: 1; z-index: 8675309; display: none; cursor: pointer; top: 147px; left: 91px;"> Save</span></p>
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Ep20 - Gin & Sloe Gin - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p style="text-align: center;"><img style= "display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/Hogarth_gin_lane.jpg" alt="" width="369" height="428" /></p> <p>It's the mid point between Christmas and New Year…we might benefit from a break from the excesses. We can't go cold-turkey from the excesses of non-stop food and drink so a gin and tonic or a bit of sloe gin is a welcome comfort. The Sloe, or wild Plum, is the fruit of the Blackthorn found in the hedgerows. By autumn these small fruits are oval, blue-black and their sourness makes them perfect to cover with sugar and gin which by Christmas has formed into a perfectly luxurious holiday tipple, sloe gin.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style= "display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/sloefairy.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="550" /><span style="font-size: 8pt;">Cicely Mary Barker, The Sloe Fairy, Flower Fairy series c. 1927</span></p> <ul> <li>The Sloe, or wild Plum, is the fruit of the Blackthorn found in the hedgerows. By autumn these small fruits are oval, blue-black and their sourness makes them perfect to cover with sugar and gin which by Christmas will have formed into a perfectly luxurious holiday tipple, sloe gin.</li> <li>Gin was invented in Holland around 1650 and it made it’s way to England not long after. Distilled from grain, it gets its name from the crushed juniper berries it passes through which are called genever in Dutch.</li> <li>Juniper berries have long been used medicinally with their cordials being renowned for their astringent, restorative and sustaining properties.</li> <li>They were even thrown on the floors of medieval homes so that when guests walked upon them the cracked juniper berries would emit their fragrant spice...a sort of applied pot pouri.</li> <li>Less than a hundred years from when it was invented, England found itself in the midst of an all-out gin craze.</li> <li>Gin was the first spirit produced in the industrial age and gin was incredibly inexpensive due to the fact that the government did not tax grain OR distillation.</li> <li>Sloe gin was known as the poor mans port' and adding sloes helped to cover the many unfortunate ingredients being added to it to make it even cheaper.</li> <li>The Gin acts changed legislation to try to curb the ‘gin craze.’<br /> Charles Dickens loved gin and punches and there are many legends connecting his literary works and social habits and excursions.</li> </ul> <p>A few years back I decided to bundle all my interests together and rebrand from Smy Chutney to Smy Goodness so that all my preserves, crafts, products and workshops could live together in one place. My own podcast seemed a suitable place to uncover, understand and enjoy things related to food, art, history and design. Please do share your stories, knowledge, questions and suggestions. In the Smy Goodness.com podcast section you will find the podcasts and all the items that we are discussing and will have ongoing discussions about each week.</p> <p>You can also follow Smy Goodness on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr. I'd like to thank Ashley Palmer for use of his Roland R-09 and Matteo Borea for creating the music. Thank you for listening.</p> <p><span style= "border-radius: 2px; text-indent: 20px; width: auto; padding: 0px 4px 0px 0px; text-align: center; font: bold 11px/20px 'Helvetica Neue',Helvetica,sans-serif; color: #ffffff; background: #bd081c no-repeat scroll 3px 50% / 14px 14px; position: absolute; opacity: 1; z-index: 8675309; display: none; cursor: pointer; top: 24px; left: 85px;"> Save</span></p> <p><span style= "border-radius: 2px; text-indent: 20px; width: auto; padding: 0px 4px 0px 0px; text-align: center; font: bold 11px/20px 'Helvetica Neue',Helvetica,sans-serif; color: #ffffff; background: #bd081c no-repeat scroll 3px 50% / 14px 14px; position: absolute; opacity: 1; z-index: 8675309; display: none; cursor: pointer; top: 24px; left: 85px;"> Save</span></p>
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Ep19 - Christmas Chutney - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p>How do you eat your chutney? What is your favourite cheese and chutney combination?</p> <p>Today’s Christmas food is chutney. Since the last 12 Foods of Christmas episode featured cheese, it would seem only fitting that we follow that up with chutney. I have often been asked by Spanish or Italian friends or customers what a chutney is. Chutney originated in India and has now become a staple condiment that has no standard recipe. Discoveries, capitalism and colonialism all contributed to chutneys and pickles making their way back to the UK and once here they were adapted and reproduced with local ingredients and over time a distinctly British chutney has emerged that is related to yet slightly different to the chutneys produced in India which are all so different and varied as the countless regional varieties existing now and throughout their culinary history.</p> <p>Mango chutneys were first imported from India to England and France in ceramic pots in the late 1600s. Recipes for “mangoed” fruits or vegetables began appearing in western cookbooks not long after their introduction. The love of chutneys and pickles soon spread across England with them quickly becoming part of the national foodscape. It’s loose recipe consists of capturing seasonal fruit and/or vegetables and preserving them with sweet and sour ingredients plus spices. Mango chutney is one of the most eaten preserves across the world.</p> <p>Chutney is about sustainability, preservation techniques, avoiding wastage and having access to the flavours of seasonal ingredients throughout the year. There is no set recipe and even if there was batches would often yield different results as fruits and vegetables vary widely from season to season based on the conditions they faced through out their growing season. Chutney has long been a pantry staple and in those pantries you were likely to find a wide variety of chutney from different crops, with different spicing and probably from different makers. Gifting chutney is a great way to show you care, share flavour combinations and also a way to get rid of the 25+ jars of pear chutney that this years glut has provided. Christmas is also a great time to enjoy chutney because it falls 3-5 months after so may fruits and vegetables have been in season, that’s 3-5 months for them to be infused with their spices so that they make that perfect accompaniment to meat, cheese and more.</p> <p>These foods that are shared and adapted and reinvented...this is exactly what I am trying to capture with Smy Goodness and this podcast. Just as ingredients, flavours, recipes and dishes have been adapted and adopted throughout time - this is still happening ALL OVER THE WORLD.</p>
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Ep18 - Christmas Cheese - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p>It’s a perfect symphony of seasonality. Many cheeses that we enjoy at Christmas have been made in the summer and are just coming in to peak maturity around the holidays. What’s your cheese? British classics or continental cheeses? Are you someone who goes for the cheese board rather than a pudding? Luckily at Christmas you can sample ALL the cheeses and all the puddings! It's a perfectly delicious puzzle when choosing ones post Christmas dinner plate of cheeses and pairing them with chutneys, crackers, sweet wines and ports.</p> <p> </p> <p><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/cheese_still_life.jpg" alt="" width="624" height="351" /><br /> Floris van Dyck (c. 1575–1651) Still Life with Cheeses, c. 1615</p> <p><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/paul_thomas_cheesemaking_medieval_era.jpg" alt="" width="455" height="489" /><br /> Medieval illustration of cheese makers</p> <p><span style= "border-radius: 2px; text-indent: 20px; width: auto; padding: 0px 4px 0px 0px; text-align: center; font: bold 11px/20px 'Helvetica Neue',Helvetica,sans-serif; color: #ffffff; background: #bd081c no-repeat scroll 3px 50% / 14px 14px; position: absolute; opacity: 1; z-index: 8675309; display: none; cursor: pointer; top: 621px; left: 18px;"> Save</span></p> <p><span style= "border-radius: 2px; text-indent: 20px; width: auto; padding: 0px 4px 0px 0px; text-align: center; font: bold 11px/20px 'Helvetica Neue',Helvetica,sans-serif; color: #ffffff; background: #bd081c no-repeat scroll 3px 50% / 14px 14px; position: absolute; opacity: 1; z-index: 8675309; display: none; cursor: pointer; top: 216px; left: 18px;"> Save</span></p>
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Ep17 - Oranges - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p>In the 5 or 6 weeks prior to Christmas is when clementines, satsumas, manderins and tangerines come into season and join forces to dominate the fruit bowl. Their flavours and essences appear throughout our food, drink and traditions throughout Christmas. Find out about the roots and origins of oranges and the differences between the easy-peelers. We'll learn about St. Nicholas and why we put oranges in stockings with help of Gentile da Fabriano and his painting, Three Gold Balls.</p> <p><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/st-nicholas-and-the-three-gold-balls-from-the-predella-of-the-quaratesi-triptych-from-san.jpg" alt="" width="601" height="595" /></p> <p>Three Gold Balls, Gentile da Fabriano’s ,1425. San Niccolo, Florence<br /> From the predella of the Quaratesi triptych</p> <p> </p> <p><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/still_life_with_oranges_and_wine.jpg" alt="" width="440" height="288" /></p> <p>Still Life with Oranges and Goblet of Wine (c. 1880-1890s, John Frederick Peto (1854 - 1907)</p>
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Ep16 - Mulled Wine - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p>It has lots of the familiar spices we associate with Christmas infused together in warmed wine, spirits, fruit and sugar. Walk in to a party from the cold and serving mulled wine and you’ll know instantly as it saturates your sense of smell and warms you up as it fills your belly. Since pre-history we have found ways to drink fermented beverages and we owe thanks to the Greeks and the Romans for specifically bringing mulled wine to Northern Europe and throughout the world. We'll discuss Circe, her role in the Odyssey and with Odysseus will be discussed as well as her appearance in Gioacchino Assereto's painting Circe Mulling Wine. I share my own tips and recipe for mulled wine and more.</p>
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Ep15 - Christmas Goose - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p>Goose - the squatted, more flavourful, dark meat alternative to their dry, white-melted fowl cousin the turkey. The custom and popularity of eating a goose during autumnal and winter harvest and holidays stretches from when they were domesticated by the Egyptians over 4000 years ago. This episode looks at traditions throughout the ages including the long-running Tavistock Goosey Fair, Michaelmas, the Smithfield's Market Christmas Eve Sale and the goose/turkey dynamic of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol.</p>
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Ep14 - Cinnamon - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p>It works sweet or savoury and can be oh-so overpowering if you let it. It’s not my favourite spice and is one that I use sparingly so that it doesn’t dominate a dish, but properly balanced, cinnamon brings warmth and depth of flavour to dishes all year round but particularly at Christmas. We'll look at its importance throughout the ancient world, how beneficial it is in terms of health and how it is only recently enjoyed by the masses. Artwork from 'Tractatus de Herbis' by Dioscorides, 15th century.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/cinammonEnglishMerchant.jpg" alt="" width="311" height="404" /></p>
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Ep13 - Cranberry Sauce - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p>These small, round, bright-red berries are more tart than sweet which makes them a perfect accompaniment to roast meat and dinners bringing a nice bright dash of Christmas red to ones plate. This week we look at how these North American fruits have become part of Christmas, gained status as a superfood and the many ways they can be enjoyed throughout the holidays and year-round.</p> <p><img style= "display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/thanksgiving-ad_ocean-spray-cranberry-sauce-1962.jpg" alt="" width="450" height="585" /><img style= "display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src= "https://assets.libsyn.com/secure/show/97140/P1010430.jpg" alt="" width="400" height="300" /></p> <p><span style= "border-radius: 2px; text-indent: 20px; width: auto; padding: 0px 4px 0px 0px; text-align: center; font: bold 11px/20px 'Helvetica Neue',Helvetica,sans-serif; color: #ffffff; background: #bd081c no-repeat scroll 3px 50% / 14px 14px; position: absolute; opacity: 1; z-index: 8675309; display: none; cursor: pointer;"> Save</span></p>
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Ep12 - Brussel Sprouts - Twelve Foods of Christmas
<p>When I was little I was sure that someone with magical powers had shrunk cabbages into bite size portions. If you don’t think they taste delicious, you’re probably cooking them wrong! And if you’re just eating them at Christmas…well lots of people do but they deserve a place at the table beyond the Christmas holidays and sprouts are a £650,000,000 business with loads of varieties to try and inventive pairings and ways to prepare them. Artwork from Amedee Varin.</p> <p><span style= "border-radius: 2px; text-indent: 20px; width: auto; padding: 0px 4px 0px 0px; text-align: center; font: bold 11px/20px 'Helvetica Neue',Helvetica,sans-serif; color: #ffffff; background: #bd081c no-repeat scroll 3px 50% / 14px 14px; position: absolute; opacity: 1; z-index: 8675309; display: none; cursor: pointer; top: 165px; left: 82px;"> Save</span></p>
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Ep11 - Mincemeat - Twelve Foods of Christmas by Smy Goodness Podcast
<p>Mincemeat and mince pies are markers of Christmas. Mincemeat is the filling baked inside pies and they originally contained dried fruit, spices, vinegar and meat when they first appeared in the 15th century. There’s the old wives' tale that you should eat a mince pie on each of the 12 days of Christmas for good luck in the upcoming year...if I eat two per day will it bring me double the good luck next year? Listen for a brief look at the history, art and design of mincemeat.</p>
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Ep10 - Plates and Platters with Tim Parker of You'll Soon Know on NTS
<p>This week I sat down with Tim Parker the Web Developer, Designer, DJ and host of the NTS radio programme You'll Soon Know. We discussed food and music memories, travel, design and how we approach and share all of the above.</p> <p>Before my chat with Tim I look at the history of plates from our pre-history days as humans and their quick evolution from functional pieces to decorative, artistic and even space exploring items. The work of Judy Chicago, Chloe Wise, Dr Amanda Furman's The Ascent of Woman, the Voyager Golden records and more are discussed.</p>
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Ep9 - Anyone Sycophancy a Fig?
<p>Figs are one of the earliest if not our earliest cultivated plant.  Their reverence surely stems from their historic connection to our own agricultural journey and they are a symbol of abundance and important to ancient peoples, cultures, art, cookery and religions. They are symbols of fertility, wealth, youth and the brevity of life. This episode will look at the Greek etymology behind 'sycophancy' and the Roman Apicius' recipe for fegato. Artists discussed include Giovanna Garzoni, Albrecht Durer, Clara Peeters, Suzanne Valadon, Vivienne Westwood and Figs in Wigs.</p>
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Ep8 - Dumplings with Peiran Gong and Tongtong Ren of Chinese Laundry Room
<p>They occur all over the world in some shape or form - you might know them as ravioli, empanada, gyoza, fufu, piroges, tortellini - pastries filled with savoury meat and/or vegetables or even sweet versions filled with fruit. They can be steamed, boiled, broiled, baked or fried.</p> <p>This episode will focus on the Chinese dumpling, and look at how this ancient food is the epitome of a food so steeped in art, history and design that, when done properly, is a little edible works of art. I will focus specifically on jiaozi, guotie, zongzi and wonton dumplings and look at stories of the Silk Road, the Chinese physician Zhang Zhongjing, the poet Qu Yuan and how dumplings, family and festivals are always linked together. I will be talking with Tongtong (Tungtong) Ren and Peiran Gong - the owners and chefs of Chinese Laundry Room. We’ll discuss the originality behind both their restaurant and the path that has taken them from their native China to London. Art by Shaoqiang Chen, Qi Baishi, Yiying L and more.</p>
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Ep7 - Bunches of Grapes
<p>Grapes are one of the first plants to be grown domestically by people and their cultivation cycle has been embedded deep within us. One only needs to look at the symbolic, religious and cultural importance of grapes to get a small fathoming of what they must have meant to the early peoples who first fermented them to what they mean across the world today. Since Ancient Greece artists have used grapes to show off their artistic skills by capturing the beauty held within both the individual grapes and as a whole bunch on their vines. Grapes are symbolic of harvests, abundance, fertility and luxury. Grapes feature in association with Dionysus, the Greek God and his Roman equivalent Bacchus, who were the both Gods of wine, vegetation, pleasure, festivity, madness and wild frenzy. We'll look at the art of Zeuxis, Juan Fernandez El Labrador, Louise Moillon, Luca Forte, Georgia O'Keeffe, Alfred Steiglitz and Grimanesa Amoros. Their impact cannot be downplayed; grapes are intertwined with humans as the vines that they grow on. An allegory to life and times of abundance and drought, hard work, establishing roots and pruning for the future, and just generally the beautiful outcomes of all of the above and the celebrations and things shared alongside it.</p>
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Ep6 - Ice Cream w/Tara Esperanza of T.O.I.C. - Tara's Organic Ice Cream
<p><strong>Show Notes:</strong><br /> 0-2.30 - Episode Intro<br /> 2.30-7.30 - Ice cream, history and design<br /> 7.30-10.15 - Picasso, Axell, Burman - artists and ice cream depiction<br /> 10.15 - 57 - Tara Esperanza of T.O.I.C. interview<br /> 57-59 - episode closing comments</p> <p>This week it's ice cream! Listen above to hear how, why and when ice cream became the world-wide popular dish that it is is. Everyone has their own memories and preferences relating to this frozen treat that it delicious served with fruit, cake in a cone or on its own - I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream.  We'll uncover where ice cream originated and how design helped it to go from a food reserved only for the wealthy elite to a food enjoyed by people of all ages, backgrounds all over the world. We'll look at artworks that celebrate this food that is so connected to our pleasure senses. I'll be looking at the artwork of Pablo Picasso, Evelyne Axell and Chila Kumari Burman.</p> <p>Tara Esperanza of Tara's Organic Ice Cream and I chatted about ice cream, food culture, memories, trends and the artistry of food. Tara and I go way back and her passion is such an inspiration as a friend, artist, woman and businessperson. You can find Tara’s Organic Ice Cream at their two California shops, one in Oakland and one in Berkeley. They have a loyal following owing to their ethos of organic, hand-crafted, quality and sustainability and their offering of over 173 flavours which are made with limited availability or seasonal ingredients.</p> <p> </p>
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Ep5 - Pancakes & Creativity w/ Aimee Furnival of Another Studio
<p>This week I'll be looking at pancakes and chatting to Aimee Furnival, Founder and Director of Another Studio. Aimee and I made pancakes together, something we have done countless times. Pancakes are the popular breakfast food that are generally enjoyed on the weekend, at brunch or special occasions. It's always a special occasion to spend time with Aimee who is a truly wonderful friend and a creative inspiration. Over pancakes we chatted about design processes from start to finish and how creativity and design affects the items that surround us in our kitchens and dining rooms and as we prepare and share our meals.  As well as special occasions pancakes have traditional links to many different religious holidays but their roots go back much farther than organised religion. This episode will look at how and why the flat, round pancake is universally enjoyed across the world in different variations and how this has been represented in art, history and design.</p>
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Ep4 - Canapés with Diana Pinkett of Vegan Peasant Catering
<p>Diana Pinkett of Vegan Peasant Catering and I discuss how canapes, travelling, family and life have impacted on her everyday life and that of her and her partner Adrian Smith's 100% plant based catering company. Join us for that as well as a little exploration in to canapes and their evolution from ancient times to today. Where did they come from? How did they get their name? And how are they represented today throughout food, art, history and design.</p>
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Ep3 - The Magical Lemon w/Hardeep Singh Kohli
<p>This week it's all about the magical lemon and I sat down with comedian, chef, journalist, broadcaster and my dear friend Hardeep Singh Kohli to talk about his professional take on lemons. As usual in the interviews for the podcast, personal memories came to mind and as usual with Hardeep we had lots of laughs throughout our conversation.</p>
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Ep2 - Popping Cherries w/Mike Wolff
Come and join me on a little cherry adventure! Throughout the ages cherries have been symbolic of life, love, rebirth, fertility, reproduction and sexuality. I was joined by visual artist, street photographer and dear friend Mike Wolff to discuss his work, creative inspirations and to reminisce about the Black Forest, Black Forest Cake and more.
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Ep1 - Emilio de la Morena & Quince
I sat down with Emilio de la Morena to chat about quince, the fruit from antiquity resembling a pear/apple hybrid which has inspired cooks, artists and lovers. Emilio is the Creative Director at Emilio de la Morena, a fashion brand that designs and manufactures luxury womenswear. The aim of the podcast is to explore how food, art, history and design intersect. Born in Spain, Emilio studied at Central Saint Martins and the London College of Fashion; a Spanish artisan with a London aesthetic. It made perfect sense to kick off the podcast with a discussion of where quince originated, how it traveled the world, its uses and inspirations to us and others throughout the ages.
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Ep0 - Introducing Smy Goodness Podcast
This podcast will look at food, history, art and design. How, why and where they intersect and the impact that they have had and have on our culture and experiences. Together we’ll travel the world throughout time and space to uncover tales, facts, people and objects that have shaped our everyday lives in ways we may not have realised.
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