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The Creative Giant Show reveals a behind-the-scenes peek at creative success so you can start to understand what really separates those who are successful in their careers, businesses, and professional endeavors. (Hint: it's not what you think.)

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Podcast Episode's:
The End of the Creative Giant Show
In this last episode of the Creative Giant Show, we discuss why we’re ending it and what comes next.
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142: 12 Simple Ways to Be Present
Increasing Presence, Decreasing Anxiety
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141: How to Balance Entrepreneurship and Fatherhood with Mike Bruny and Jeremie Miller
Entrepreneurial Fatherhood
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140: Q&A #11: Habit Stacking, Important but Not Urgent Projects, and Tips on Using Medium
Taking Small Steps to Build a Better You
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Episode 139: The Relationship Between Grief and Creativity with Cath Duncan and Kara Jones
Permission to Grieve or Not to Grieve
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138: The 3 Goals of Any Business Activity
Cash Flow, Opportunities, and Visibility
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137: Systems, Creativity, and Emotion with Marina Darlow
Building Systems to Fit Your Creativity
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136: Q&A #10: Having a No Electronics Rule, Switching Your Focus, and Conducting a Mid-Month Review
In this Q&A, Angela joins Charlie to answer questions from the Campfire about why they have a no electronics rule in the bedroom or dining room area, how to determine if your current focus block isn’t going to work and how to switch to something else, and how to conduct a mid-month review. Key Takeaways: [1:02] - Angela and Charlie have a no electronics rule in the bedroom/ at the dining room table . How did they decide to do this, how do they actually do this, and what do they feel like it’s done for them? How can the listener incorporate this without feeling like they might miss out on business opportunities if they’re not always available? [1:45] - Firstly, Charlie encourages letting go of the 24/7 availability, unless you are really in an emergency response role. This way, your clients are getting the best you have to offer when you are available. Additionally, we miss more business opportunities because we’re frazzled, not because we’re not available. [4:20] - Angela and Charlie have been following this rule for about ten years. It began to get frustrating when one would be on their phone while the other was talking, and they wanted to spend the time they had together actually being together. They have a place for their phones when they get home, and also don’t have a television in their bedroom. This allows them to be intentional about their media consumption. [10:30] - This was born out of personal observation of people browsing through their phones while being engaged with others, and it really started to bother Angela. Charlie and Angela had several discussions about it to figure out the best way to implement and carry it out. [14:05] - It’s awfully easy to get back into those habits of being constantly connected to our devices, but when we take a step back, we can use that time to connect with ourselves and those around us. To start, we can think about what would feel good to us, then communicate that to clients or family, so we can show up at our best for them. [20:09] - Jeremy from the Campfire wants to know: How do you determine if your current creative block (focus block) just isn’t going to work and you switch to something different? How do you get back on track with a creative block (focus block) once you start falling off track? [21:05] - There is a quick recap of what focus blocks are and how they work. Charlie touches on some things that may make it difficult to get through one: getting through the thrash/ resistance and being human. Sometimes, it’s hard to decide where to start or whether something is working. Other times, you might just be in a fog - whether it’s hunger, or exhaustion - and it’s important to understand that this could affect your work. [26:19] - Taking some time before you start to check in with yourself can help you re-center and get started, or evaluate and decide if you’re time is going to be well-spent in your current state. You may need to take care of yourself before you get started on a focus block. [28:15] - The last question asked is, can you please explain how to conduct mid-month reviews? What should we be focused on, and what should we look for? [28:54] - A lot of times when you are in a monthly planning cycle, by the end of the month you might forget what you’re working toward. A mid-month review is important for staying on track and making sure you know where your goals are headed. [29:46] - Look for a good time in the middle of the month, maybe a Sunday or a Monday. Questions to ask: What have you accomplished this month? What goals or projects need to be adjusted or dropped based upon what has actually happened? What are the priorities for the rest of the month? What bills need to be paid, and what funds are in place to pay them? What projects or tasks have fallen off the radar? When was the last time you rewarded yourself, and when will be the next? [35:20] - It doesn’t take too long to conduct a mid-month review. Try not to conduct it in your workspace; do it in a place where you can focus on it and be complete about it. The process allows you to start with the good, look for improvement, and then end with a reward for yourself - this is a very encouraging and important process! [38:01] - Summary of questions and topics discussed. How will they help you flourish this week?   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group The Mid-Month Review Leave a Review
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135: How Side Projects Help with Your Main Project with Nicole Stevenson
A lot of creative people thrive on having multiple side projects, but at the same time, having side projects may cause your main projects to suffer. Nicole Stevenson joins Charlie to jam about how having side projects might help you with your main projects. She brings her vast experiences as an entrepreneur - clothing line creator, craft show extraordinaire, illustrator, among many others - to discuss how she got started on the two main ventures she’s working on today, aspects of working with a business partner to make projects work, as well as the various benefits working on side projects can provide to main business projects.   Key Takeaways: [2:53] - Nicole shares a bit of her history, recounting some of her business and entrepreneurial ventures and tracing their evolution to get to where she is today. Her creative interests led to observations about different things in the crafting community, and she joined with her aunt to start up Patchwork Show and eventually Craft-cation. [7:47] - Charlie talks about predetermined business plans versus responsive business plans. With Nicole’s sort of adaptive process, how did she and her business partner let go of the old things to focus on the things that matter most right now? As she evaluated which aspects of her work were exciting and profitable, she slowly let other things drop off. [12:17] - Sometimes when things reach a certain level of maturity, or aren’t as new anymore, they might lose some of the magic that had us holding on to them. On the flip side, sometimes when projects are spaced out at cyclical intervals, each time you come back to it can be new and exciting. [14:09] - When we’re in the business of making creative things, there are a lot of open-loop projects. Having some closed-loops projects, maybe more of the admin side of your business, can be refreshing to balance out the other projects. [17:01] - Breaking down your tasks into smaller steps can make tackling some of the big projects more manageable. It can also increase our sense of accomplishment to be completing small steps towards finishing a big task. A good balance between small tasks divided over a certain amount of time is very beneficial in keeping your to-do list manageable. [20:20] - How can managing side projects make us better at our main projects? Having side projects that may get us connected with other people or things can be refreshing towards work with our main projects. [23:31] - Part of being a creative knowledge worker is recognizing that our emotion is one of the ingredients we’re working with. It is important to be mindful of our emotions and how they tie in to what we produce. Side projects can be an avenue to separate some of these emotions so the negative effects don’t drift into the main projects. [25:28] - Charlie talks about the importance of being in a divergent population of creatives, and the benefits of small projects can help the work we do with our main projects be more focused and provide different solutions. [29:05] - How do Nicole and her business partner workout temporal misalignments, or managing different time requirements between side projects and their main business? Evaluating who is better suited to managing and working on different tasks is important for both parties involved. Specifically for Nicole and Delilah, communication is key. [33:59] - In a partnership, it is not likely that each person will be doing the exact same work during a week. It is unlikely that it will be an even 50/50 distribution. Keeping track of these hours can also lead to conversations about the relative value of work. [38:02] - How does Nicole measure success when it comes to all her projects, both side projects and main projects? At the end of the day, she measures success based on whether she is proud of the work she’s doing, and feels like she is giving the best she can give to her community. [42:28] - For creative entrepreneurs in general, it is important to make reading about financial aspects part of your regular flow. [45:59] - Nicole leaves listeners with this invitation: start a side project, whether it’s something for your business, something for yourself, or something for your money. Anything that requires your attention is considered a project - pick a project out that is the most manageable for where you are.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Nicole Stevenson Studio Dear Handmade Life Patchwork Show Craftcation Chunking TCGS Episode 131 with Larry Robertson App: Hours Keeper Investment App: Acorns Credit App: Credit Karma Leave a Review
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134: 5 Ways to Get Through the Creative Red Zone
Today’s episode is a requested reading of a previously published post on Productive Flourishing named “5 Ways to Get Through the Creative Red Zone.” This article lists five ways to get projects that are almost done into the finished stage.   Key Takeaways: [0:48] - The creative “red zone” is when you have a project that is almost finished, and you feel as if you have just as much to do as you did when you started the final push. Charlie discusses this analogy as it relates to football and creative projects. [3:04] - 1. Double-down by returning to the why of a project: As we draw toward deadlines, we tend to lose sight of why we started the project in the first place. Reminding ourselves why can give us the extra push we need to finish - a gift to both ourselves and others. [3:45] - 2. Focus on getting it to good enough: If your goal is perfection, you will never get it done. We need other people to make our work excellent, which requires us to let go when it’s good enough. [4:16] - 3. Know that the more it matters, the more it’s only a start anyway: We often falsely assume that the more it matters, the better the start of it should be. In reality, the more something matters, the better it is that we start finishing sooner, so we can get it out in the world. [5:02] - 4. Understand that you’re usually working on your own mindset toward the end: Often, once we’re in the red zone, we continue to work without really getting anywhere. What we’re really working on is our own mindset. [6:02] - 5. Do your work, and then step away: There’s only so much we can do with creative work to make sure that it’s successful. When you make art, you give up predictability for remarkability. [6:37] - In finishing creative work, we risk our project failing, but we’ll be out of the red zone. Finishing a project allows for more self-reflection and change moving forward. [7:07] - You’ll always have a red zone; it never goes away if you’re really showing up. Charlie encourages us to get real about the type of projects in which we are investing our time.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Original Post: 5 Ways to Get Through the Creative Red Zone Leave a Review
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133: Small Business as a Vehicle for Social Change with Pam Slim
As entrepreneurs and small business owners, we can help create solutions that create positive social change - promoting diversity and inclusion, distributing wealth, creating opportunities, and promote flourishing. In today’s episode, Pam Slim joins Charlie to talk about how small business owners can lead the way for this change. Tune in today to hear their discussion and ideas!   Key Takeaways: [3:51] - They share a love of supporting the small business market, specifically those that are the lifeblood of communities - founded on passion and dreams. As social dynamics change, how can we continue to support this small business sector? [7:10] - Pam shares her work with her new business - a physical place to foster growth. Through her previous travels, she gained great insight into communities coming together to connect, and this spurred her to work to create a positive experience in her own community - specifically focusing on the Native American community as well as other marginalized communities in Mesa, AZ. [11:43] - In what ways can one be involved in these kinds of conversations? One of the biggest things for Charlie and Pam is being more intentionally inclusive and working to expand diversity in speaker panels and leadership boards. In addition, this creates spaces where more people feel that they belong and have something to contribute. [16:10] - From a small business perspective, there has been a tremendous amount of opportunity and growth in the small business sector, as well as within certain markets and demographics. [20:33] - Pro-big versus pro-small camps: While there is the argument that the big companies generate wealth, the small companies distribute wealth. We need both, especially considering the opportunities small businesses can offer to vulnerable youth, recent graduates, and even older seniors wanting to get back into the workforce. These opportunities could be life-changing for some groups of people who are feeling rejected or unwanted in the workforce. [25:47] - Bouncing off the creation of new businesses and spaces, how can existing businesses be intentional about providing an atmosphere in which people with various backgrounds can work? [29:12] - There’s constant learning, and also such great change and innovation that can happen by beginning to ask questions and make some of these intentional shifts. Pam talks about expanding the definition of success to include not just personal financial gain, but also the health and well-being of the surrounding community.  [31:40] - It is a limiting belief that focusing on some of these changes is going to cost a lot to execute. When you do the work, it doesn’t, and the gain is huge! People from diverse communities actually seek businesses and organizations that support their communities. [36:25] - We all have work to do in our communities, but there’s never a bad time to start the work that needs to be done. [37:00] - Charlie talks about his experiences when he first moved to Portland to connect with some of these communities (not just online). He got connected with the investment community and learned about how decisions are made within companies, and was able to apply this knowledge to more of the native communities in Portland. [39:12] - Since starting this venture, it has really encouraged Charlie to focus on simple, but universal messages that apply across communities. Thinking about this can change the approach of discussing some topics with different communities of people. [45:55] - Perhaps our goals in terms of charitable giving should be looking into how we can be doing the work with other people as equals. [48:04] - Charlie and Pam talk about hiring locally versus looking outside of our communities or even the nation for hiring. There is great discussion of different considerations from both sides! [51:26] - The point is to start asking questions about how you are intentionally making choices in your business that benefit your local, national, and global communities. Our benefits come from thinking outside the box of a self-gain model. [54:03] - Pam’s invitation for listeners: look at your community, notice and celebrate which people are participating in your community, ask yourself who is not here, then ask yourself why they are not there. Then, ask yourself how you can begin to build bridges to people you want to be there. What small step can you make in the next week?   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Escape from Cubicle Nation K’é Body of Work: Finding the Thread That Ties Your Story Together Escape for Cubicle Nation (Book) one n ten Malcom Gladwell: The Tipping Point The Creative Giant Show: Episode 1 Leave a review  
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132: Q&A #9: Decision Fatigue, Business Growth, and Managing Multiple Projects While Overwhelmed
In the 9th Q&A episode, Angela joins Charlie to answer questions from the campfire about decision fatigue, business growth problems, and how to manage multiple projects when you’re already overwhelmed.   Key Takeaways: [1:06] - The show must go on! As a precursor to the depth of this episode, Charlie and Angela talk a bit about balancing hectic schedules with times of self care. [4:03] - The first listener from the Campfire wants to know what advice Charlie can offer on how she can reduce decision fatigue in all areas of her life. [4:18] - Decision fatigue is when you are in the midst of making either micro or normal decisions, and you wear out. Charlie suggests a few things to help: 1) Defaults can save you so much by eliminating some of decisions you have to make, because you’ve already made them in advance. 2) Try to have your bigger decisions happen when you have high energy; creating and keeping a decision list can to help organize and prioritize these things. 3) Look for ways you can make top level decisions by analyzing more deeply the source of decision on a lower level. [9:30] - Angela talks about how things can very easily start to cascade down when we haven’t had a chance to sit down and premeditate some of our decisions. Taking a little time beforehand to plan some things can save time and stress later on down the road when you have to make the decision or carry out a task. [11:58] - Another campfire listener wants to know what suggestions Charlie has to handle business growth problems, specifically because she’s grappling between scaling and pivoting in her business. [12:34] - When you’re have a growth challenge, take a moment to think about where you want to be three or five years down the road, and how does what you’re thinking about doing help get you there or prevent you from getting there. [14:17] - Charlie encourages thinking about what scaling might allow you to do that really matters for your business, your team, your family, and your business ecosystem. Be clear about the why when it comes to growth and scaling. [17:38] - In almost every case, eliminating something you’re doing is usually the best track forward, whether you’re scaling or pivoting. Anticipate that you might be making these types of decisions about every five to seven years. [19:45] - Our last campfire listener is looking for some best practices on managing multiple projects, both in a professional and personal sense. How can she handle more than she can handle, and what tools and systems can be used to keep track of everything? [21:00] - The first thing to do is start with a triage: which of the projects are absolutely essential? The timeline may need to be upleveled - set goals around the number of focus blocks you have. Another way to approach it may be by dedicating a day to one project, and moving each further along in that manner. [23:42] - The other thing is to maybe get to a point of acceptable mediocrity - we can’t be excellent at everything all the time. Communicating with a support system the things you can and can’t do is very important. [26:48] - We have to learn to say no more than we say yes; you can’t say yes to everything. Continue to check in with saying yes to the things that are in alignment for you.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group The Five Why’s Leave a Review Productive Flourishing  
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131: Questioning the Givens of Creativity with Larry Robertson
Larry Robertson, author and thought leader, joins Charlie to jam about creativity. In this episode, they cover everything including what creativity is, where breakthroughs come through, unhelpful myths that prevent us from understanding creativity, the roles space and time have for the creative process, and the different modes of creativity.   Key Takeaways: [0:56] - Charlie gives an introduction to Larry Robertson. [3:50] - Through his previous experiences in various roles in the entrepreneurial universe, Larry started noticing a pattern of people wanting to know “what is entrepreneurship?” His first book was a pull back to explore how entrepreneurship fits into a larger picture, and what is behind entrepreneurship: creativity. [7:51] - Charlie and Larry talk about the tension between the context of business and a context outside of business. How can we look outwards from the limited focus of our domains of expertise to invite other elements into our business practices? [11:07] - One of the keys to creativity is that is it variable - things (and you!) are going to change with time and circumstances. When we lean into this change, it can be quite uncomfortable - when we realize that this is part of the process, it can actually invite more moments of creativity. [14:46] - Creativity is something we often seek out when we are in a pinch. Larry’s book approaches creativity from the opposite perspective. Rather than thinking of where creativity ends, he encourages focus on where it begins and the process that it flows through. [17:02] - Charlie talks about his concept of slow magic: sometimes the work that matters the most happens slowly. [22:06] - Continuing this idea of a slow build versus lightning strikes, Larry talks about creativity being an accumulation. How can we lead ourselves toward that accumulation that leads to the big idea? [23:42] - Stu Coffman’s  concept of the adjacent possible: sometimes the biggest breakthroughs come from just moving to the edges of what you know. When you look back on the world you know, you can’t help but see it differently. Finally, when you explore the adjacent possible, you make the possible bigger. [27:27] - When you’re trying to figure out how to move forward with your next big idea, the trick is to immerse yourself into the work being done in not just your field, but also in the fields where your expertise overlaps with your other interests. Allow yourself to fall into this space and find those happy accidents. [32:55] - Charlie talks about the importance of having a community of people with varied interests, passions, and expertises, and interacting with that community. This community lends itself to the idea of creativity as a co-creation. [36:58] - We have to be ready for interaction with a creative community. Larry talks about ways we can prepare ourselves on an individual level before we start to become part of a co-creation. [40:15] - Five habits of the mind: 1. How do you know what you know? 2. Is there a pattern? 3. Ask “what if” questions 4. Is there another way of looking at it? 5. Who cares? Charlie shares some of his questions of the mind as well. [46:18] - Asking these questions, both in a personal and a professional context, can confirm that you’re on the right track or bring attention to something that could be changed for the better. These can be guided by the three acts of creation: choice, reaction, and improvisation. [49:22] - How do we actionize the three acts of creation? When all three modes of creation are on the same plane, we can think about where we are on the matrix and how we can lean into those modes. We can also apply these modes in different contexts and situations. [55:16] - We all have all three acts of creation. It is important to not think of them as a hierarchy, but to work to constantly move between them so you can develop them all. [58:11] - Larry leaves us with this challenge: “The perpetual obstacle to human advancement is custom”: What are your customs that are getting in the way of your own advancement?   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group A Deliberate Pause: Entrepreneurship and its Moment in Human Progress by Larry Robertson The Language of Man: Learning to Speak Creativity by Larry Robertson Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert
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130: You Have to Make Time to Make Time
Today’s episode is a requested reading of a previous published post on Productive Flourishing. Charlie answers a question about making time to plan and how he uses certain materials to organize and remind. The key idea is that you have to make time for planning, so that you save or don’t waste time when you’re in the doing.   Key Takeaways: [0:49] - Conversation started with Eric Grey about their momentum planners - his concerns are about time spent interfacing with the system as well as time spent on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis to plan. [2:02] - The hard part is the start-up cost of using a new system. Once you have the “roadmap” built, the time spent each week will be much less. You do have to regularly spend time with the system, but the planners help to make this easier. [3:57] - Charlie uses digital apps more to memorize and remind, rather than to sort through what he needs to get done. Once he has organized what he’s doing, then he will put it in the digital app. This helps keep things in the moment. [4:59] - A hybrid approach is beneficial when the time is put in up front. When you make time to make time, you start to see that some of the things you’re doing may not be what matters most, or it can shed light on some of our habits. [5:41] - No productivity system can override your choices - they serve to support and facilitate the self-mastery of your chosen goals.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Podcast Page Original Blog Post: You Have to Make Time to Make Time  
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129: How Theming Your Week Can Make You More Productive with Mike Vardy
Mike Vardy, a friend and fellow productivity teacher, joins Charlie to talk about the power of defaults, theming your week, how to use creative/focus blocks, and how effective scheduling, planning, and decision making is really about being kind to yourself.   Key Takeaways: [2:25] - Productivity should be fun! It is important to find a harmony between frameworks that help to keep us in check, and frameworks that are too rigid to allow for fun in our productivity. [4:18] - Charlie and Mike talk about what happens when they experiment with their schedules, and how we can prioritize our schedules to suit our personal productivity goals. This is especially pertinent to morning people versus night owls. When we experiment, we can figure out what works for us and what doesn’t. [7:05] - Both Charlie and Mike speak to the idea of spontaneity within a structured schedule. When it comes to free time, they both encourage doing things you really want to do during your open time. They talk about to-do lists and calendars, and how you can organize these to meet your needs. [10:30] - Mike talks about personalizing our productivity, and how that might benefit productivity in our personal goals, as well as in the workplace. How might this look for meetings? [13:00] - Mike talks about the idea of “whole-ocracy” and how adopting this idea might make meetings more efficient and beneficial for everyone’s productivity. Organizations need to have a framework that they can thrive within, rather than one they just survive within. [14:30] - Charlie and Mike talk about meetings, and the most effective ways to organize and carry them out, and what benefits meetings have for team building. [19:02] - Charlie talks about the idea of “strategic mindfulness” - having meetings where you can hash specific things out will prevent those things from taking space at other inopportune moments. This will allow us to present in other important moments. [20:23] - Charlie talks about Mike’s practice of theming days - in this practice, you have a default for the day; you know what you’re doing that day, and you also know there’s a time and place for everything. Mike also has monthly themes that help to funnel his goals for his daily themes. [25:17] - Creative blocks and focus blocks: if you have tasks you need to get accomplished, you can chunk it out into what you can get done into two or three focus blocks. It is more attainable to figure out what you can accomplish in 90 minutes rather than a whole day. Pre-planning also leaves us in a better place to set ourselves up for success. [28:00] - Charlie and Mike talk about the idea of fierce kindness, and how that affects pre-planning and actual execution. [30:43] - What is the balance between work and rest or work and play? There are appropriate times where it is okay to not be doing anything, especially if it will be beneficial for your physical or mental health. If your day gets derailed, don’t consider the day’s theme a failure. [35:40] - Many people focus on what they can’t doing during a day, as opposed to what they can. If we shift our thinking to what we can get done in the absence of other things, that can change our relationship with productivity. [37:58] - If you’re high-energy in the evening, lean into that. You can map your days based on your theme of the day, your focus blocks, and what time of the day is the best time to work on these things. With defaults in place, we can start to see a pattern in our productivity. [41:28] - The relationship is more important than the project. As we decide what to take on, it’s important to make sure we have the ability to devote our best time and energy to the project and the relationship. When we’re kind to others, we’re kind to ourselves. [44:04] - Mike’s invitation and challenge to listeners: theme your week! Figure out how you can theme your days and finish more often the things you want to get done and move forward.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Productive Flourishing Planners productivityist.com/creativegiant Mike’s Page - link to books and other resources  
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128: Q&A #8: Creative Energy Flow, Taking Action on Your Great Ideas, and Healthy Money Conversations
Angela joins Charlie as he tackles three questions revolving around how to take action on a good idea without it being overwhelming, how to discuss goals and finances with your business team without it being awkward, and which of the Productive Flourishing planners to use to get to your creative energy flowing.   Key Takeaways: [1:25] - Alison wants to know how to get out of planning and research and into production. How can we get more connectivity between opt-ins, low- and mid-tier offerings, and service offerings? [2:00] - Ideally you would use a full customer journey map. Charlie suggests looking at those ideas in a four-part funnel: free stuff at the top, then low cost items, your medium tier, and then your high tier. In addition, he talks about what sorts of things typically fall into each category, and how those can anchor the funnel and enhance the customer journey. [6:56] - Charlie proposes that perhaps as experts, some of the tension comes from our quest to be very specific or cutting edge, but we must remember that our customers may come to us with basic questions. How do you take the conventional stuff you need to cover and make it really relevant and useful for your audience? [8:29] - Jen from the Campfire wants to know: What suggestions does Charlie have on if/how to discuss the financial side of a business with a small team, especially when it comes to revenue and bonuses? Scenario planning can be very beneficial in imagining/planning what you would do for your financials, operations, goals, and strategies (FOGS). [10:55] - Charlie talks about “open book management” and the spectrum of different ways you can discuss your finances with your whole team. You can share revenue goals without getting too specific about the breakdown. [14:08] - Too often founders and owners stress too much about the pay factor, and it is good to remember that part of the relationship does involve a good work environment, the culture, the mission, and the projects. The work there should be a benefit. [16:30] - A creative giant wants to know: Do you have any suggestions on which of your tools or planners I could start with that could help me harness my creative pull and get back in the game? Charlie recommends their “Productivity Jump Starter” and “Action Item Catcher.” [18:18] - Once you get rolling, he suggests either the “Weekly Momentum Planner” or the “Monthly Momentum Planner.” Each has its benefits depending on where you are with your projects. [20:21] - Many planning tools assume you’re going to be in the same frame of mind each time you sit down to plan. The different planners may provide different tools to fit where you might be. [22:58] - The trend across all three of these questions is grouping like things together first, then specifically deciding what to do with each, so you can organize your next step.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Link to free planners - Download today! Omnifocus Questions: email Charlie at charlie@productiveflourishing.com
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127: How Charlie Gets Stuff Done with Jennifer Labin
In this episode, Charlie and Jennifer cover the “behind the scenes” of how Charlie gets stuff done. Tune in to find out everything from why he joined the army and how he applies that to his work to his workout and self-care routines. If you like “behind the scenes” or “making of,” you’ll love this episode.   Key Takeaways: [3:13] - Charlie shares his origin story, highlighting what made him decide to go into the military. Although many of his family members also joined the army, Charlie didn’t feel pressured, but rather found that this is where he thrived. [7:22] - After eight years in the national guard, what routines or structures has Charlie carried forward with him that he gained from his experience being in the military? The biggest things are resiliency and internal coping strategies, as well as frameworks and codifying information. [12:12] - How has the resiliency and internal coping strategies helped Charlie coach other entrepreneurs? One of the main things is teaching them how to be adaptable people who can slide anywhere they need to in their business. [14:40] - Charlie mentioned that he works out two to three times a week; what does that look like for Charlie? He talks about working out with a friend, and overcoming the initial hurdle of making it a habit. [19:08] - What else is encompassed in Charlie’s self-care routine? Highlights include tea, meditation, and limited screen time. [23:35] - Charlie talks about his tech setup, which is all Mac. [28:30] - What happens when Charlie travels? Sometimes he takes his work with him, but it can be hard to get things done during the actual act of traveling. Charlie shares a bit about what works best for him for getting work done on the go. [32:00] - Jennifer asks Charlie to share some of his failed experiments. In addition to which he experiments he tried, he more importantly shares what he learned from the ventures that maybe didn’t go so well. [38:53] - Charlie talks about creating channels of communications with others. In the previous question he spoke about getting to know the content preference of his audience, but this also broadens to include seeking help from others. [42:20] - Charlie and Jennifer engage in a series of rapid-fire questions to better understand Charlie. [46:13] - What unanticipated challenge is Charlie currently facing? It is harder to let go of the manager aspects of his business than he originally imagined.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Jennifer’s Company: TERP Associates LLC Jennifer’s Books: Mentoring Programs that Work and Real World Training Guide The Creative Giant Show Episode 100
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126: Stop Lying and Start Creating
Today’s episode is a requested reading of a previously published post on Productive Flourishing named “Stop Lying and Start Creating.” The key idea is that we creative people are particularly adept at making up stories and lies that keep us from doing work - especially when it comes to research.   Key Takeaways: [0:57] - Creative people have a unique talent that exceeds our ability to create. Charlie talks about meta-doing and how creative people often participate in this. [1:30] - While we’re meta-doing, we are in a comfortable space. Charlie goes on to explain why. [2:05] - It is easy for creatives to get caught up in research - studying other people’s work and going back to previous research. While this is part of the creative process, there is a point at which you have enough information to get started. [3:05] - At a certain point, research can make you more scared if you feel your contributions will be dwarfed by the “experts” and their work. [3:30] - Charlie gives some ideas of how to get creating for several different mediums. Create something in the world today!   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Original Blog Post Productive Flourishing  
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125: How to Deal with the Guilt of Getting What You Want with Toku McCree
Toku McCree joins Charlie to jam about what they’ve experienced in themselves and their clients, and how to move through the guilt of getting what you want to achieve success.   Key Takeaways: [2:16] - Obsession with tactics and doing and how it stifles their business and personal growth. Often times when people reach a certain level of success and plateau, they are not fundamentally focusing on what’s going to make the biggest difference. [3:25] - When you get to the top 10% - 25%, tactics only go so far. Leadership relies very heavily on who you are as a person, rather than tweaking the tech side of things. [5:20] - To make the significant change, the way in which you actually make decisions, actually respond to things, and actually see the world, have to reflect the reality that’s right in front of you. Reflective equilibrium: if our experience of the world is different from our theory about the world, we have to switch something - normally we change our theories to fit the world.  [7:33] - Toku speaks about what happens when the world shifts so dramatically with some people’s success. [10:01] - So many people get stuck at an 8 out of 10 in life. But the work in those last two levels is where the real challenge lies. Your focus begins to shift inward to figure out how you need to grow and be in the world to achieve a higher level of success. [14:34] - In what way is a more virtuous man happy? This question posed by the Greeks is relevant to this topic as we think about what the payout is. Will you have to sacrifice something to gain the success you want, whether it be personal or business? Toku suggests the top 1% or 2% have mastered the balance between the tactics and the work on being, which aids in their success. [21:31] - Charlie and Toku talk about the benefits of having a coach or a group of people that can help dig deeper than the tactics and get into the being. [22:55] - Toku poses the question: Are you willing to experience the guilt of getting what you want? To peak the plateau, you may have to change the groups you associate with and the kind of person you think you are. Ultimately, you get to decide what group you want to belong to, and who you want to be. [28:53] - The thing you have the least amount of control over is the groups you’re born into, but the thing you have the most control over is the groups you belong to. It is hard work to live a virtuous life. [32:22] - Toku shares his own story about the being piece.  [36:15] - Three-fold question: 1) Why do you want your business to grow a certain way? 2) In what ways do you want to pursue your personal growth? 3) How can you do this without there being a competition or a compromise?  [39:58] - At a certain point in your life, your growth may not be accelerating at the same pace. It might be a 10-15% improvement every year, and that is just fine. Embrace the plateau. [46:45] - If you’re willing to sacrifice your ordinary excellence for something extraordinary, and become a beginner again, you can be in a place of being in continual wonder and amazement of what life can give to you. We have to learn how to fall in love with a process over and over again. [48:42] - Toku’s challenge: For one week, try to make all your decisions based upon the question: “In this moment, what would bring me joy?” Lean into the discomfort of choosing joy and accepting the guilt that may follow.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group The Hero With a Thousand Faces - Joseph Campbell Productive Flourishing
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124: Q & A #7: Priority Cagematches, Cultivating Diversity, and Troubleshooting Too-Intense Plans
Angela joins Charlie as they tackle another question & answer session, exploring the priority cage match, how to bring in more diversity into your company, and what to do when your plans are too intense.   Key Takeaways: [0:54] - Can you elaborate more on the priorities cage match? How do you allot time to things in the middle? [2:41] - When you work on several things, it’s easy to see that some things may not hold as much urgency. As the cage match illuminates your priorities, there’s a middle section of projects and goals that aren’t the most important, but they’re also not at the bottom. [6:18] - Put these projects in the schedule and devote time to them, and don’t allow yourself to get distracted by other things. The progress might not look the same as with the first-priority projects, but that is okay. [8:07] - Do you stack functions or devote certain days to certain tasks? The more you can stack in the productive areas of your life, the better off you are. [10:57] - Some of these projects get stuck in the middle because we don’t give ourselves permission to do things that make us come alive. [12:45] - As a company which has started to incorporate more diversity into our leadership, how can we grow in this aspect, and groom people from more diverse backgrounds to become leaders in our company? [13:32] - Don’t be reactive about diversity. Be proactive about getting engaged with the communities you want to be diverse in. [16:53] - Diversity by design: Your organization becomes diverse because you design it that way, rather than hoping it will become that way. Be strategic about how you approach groups and market yourself as a diversity-friendly company. [21:07] - Make sure people from the diverse backgrounds have the awareness of, and same access to the professional development opportunities that everyone else does. [23:53] - How do you decide whether your plan is too intense-activity heavy? Do you have tips for noticing you’re doing this while planning? [24:45] - We don’t have as much of the high-peak creative time as we would like. We often under-account for how taxing mental activity is. [26:02] - Think about your work more like a fitness regime: you have to balance the sprints with the jogs and the walks. It’s better to put three solid points on the board every day, rather than some days where you have none because you tapped out the previous day. [29:33] - Working at a good 85% with 100% focus, and being okay with the additional margin, is a good place to be in because it gives you space to spend with whatever else comes up in your life. [30:39] - When you look at your list, really sort by how heavy of an activity is going to be. If you notice they are all very involved, look at how you can spread them out.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Productive Flourishing: Project Cagematch
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123: Feeling Your Way through What Does Make You Happy versus Should Make You Happy with Kristin Reinbach
Kristin Reinbach joins Charlie to discuss the question of whether happiness is dependent on the culture we’re from. They talk about the difference between social norms of success and happiness versus our personal concepts of success and happiness.   Key Takeaways: [2:45] - How did Kristin get to where she is today? What inspired her to get into the “happy-making business” she’s in now? [5:15] - Charlie and Kristin engage in a conversation about happiness in other cultures that seem not to make business endeavors a primary focus. Kristin specifically shares her experience from living in Germany. [8:07] - There seems to be a shift from entrepreneurial success to more of a focus on happiness and a good life. But is there a gender stigma surrounding this idea? [9:52] - Happiness across cultures can get convoluted because people think of the effect of happiness rather than the deeper level of flourishing and thriving. [11:35] - What if creativity was more important than well-being? Kristin suggests that perhaps happiness linked to joy is more of a short-term happiness, while creativity is a more sustainable version of happiness. [15:05] - As a Western culture, we don’t seem to talk about things like character and courage as much as we used to. These things can drive our creativity and our business. [19:45] - Kristin and Charlie talk about some cultural differences between the United States and Europe in terms of how we view creativity and success in conjunction with each other, and whether that career path is acceptable in that culture. [24:05] - What are some of the differences between the genders in terms of how they approach and react to their work? A good question to ask might be: How do you want to feel? [28:00] - We are conditioned by society. This can have a big impact on whether we should be happy (surface) versus whether we are really feeling a deep, internal happiness. How does age factor into this? [35:23] - Creativity is a great tool to extend our purpose and success beyond what we do day to day to make a living. [37:57] - It is important to recognize your own creative potential, and to be able to differentiate between your version of happiness from your society’s version of happiness. [38:40] - Kristin encourages us to reevaluate the way think about what should make us happy, and focus on more on feeling happiness at a deeper level. She presents four points: be conscious about when we should feel happy, pay attention to when we’re envious, be in touch with our feelings, and the 101 Wishes List. [44:26] - Lean into the things that matter to you. Find a way to reflect on the things that matter to you. [46:27] - Kristin’s challenge: do something during the next week that feels really pointless, and see what happens. Her invitation: be a good human being - support other people who are afraid to allow their creativity to flourish.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Krysalis Consult Club of Happy Lifepreneurs Coach Myself, by Cynthia Morris First Class Meetings, by Michael Wilkinson The 4-Hour Workweek Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life Wipe the slate clean 101 wishes - chicken soup book 750 Words  
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122: Welcome to Project World
Today’s episode is a requested reading of a previously published post on Productive Flourishing called “Welcome to Project World.” The key idea is that we no longer live in a world defined by careers, but rather by projects. What we finish is more important than what we’ve been doing and working on.   Key Takeaways: [0:51] - Charlie suggests that the Industrial Revolution began a time when the world of work was “career world.” The focus shifted toward work that served a mass of unknown customers. [1:55] - Jobs in project world: In career world, we go to school to work for a company we’d likely work for during our entire careers up to retirement. In project world, the longevity of the same job is much shorter. Charlie explains why. [4:02] - When we leave a job in project world, the only thing we take with us are the things that we have finished. What counts is what we build, sell, or manage. [4:56] - Entrepreneurs and small business owners in project world: In this day and age, things are changing so quickly and that can put a lot of pressure on entrepreneurs and small business owners. [6:05] - People want to buy and experience a product - they will only buy our words for so long. [6:23] - General practices in project world: Finish something every day. Charlie calls this “shipping” - getting something out of our heads and into the world. We are the most fulfilled when we make progress on meaningful goals. [7:17] - We have unprecedented autonomy, adventure, and chance for impact via network effects. We are happiest when we’re actually finishing the work we’re meant to do.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Welcome to Project World post Drive by Dan Pink
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121: How to be Intentional During the Holidays
Charlie and Angela talk about values and expectations, priorities, and boundaries in order to amp up your holidays without amping up your stress.   Key Takeaways: [1:25] - Intentionality during the holidays: what do we want this time to look like? [3:22] - There are a lot of expectations surrounding the holiday season. It is important to have conversations about how we’d like to spend (or not spend) that time with our loved ones. We don’t want that time to pass and realize we were unable to make the connections we desired. [6:04] - It is important to focus on what we hope to feel during the holidays, rather than the things we have to do. When we’re focused on a feeling, we can project that feeling into the world. Make some space to sink into that intention so we can embody that. [10:05] - The holidays can end up becoming a process of capturing several moments that we typically have idealized in our minds. It can be hard to reconcile when something doesn’t go as planned, but we can still embody love (or any other feeling) during those times. [13:40] - Angela encourages us to take some time to think about what our intentions are during this time of the year, to gain some clarity about what they are and perhaps share our expectations with others. It is also important to be clear about our boundaries. [15:50] - Having intentions around feelings rather activities will help with expectations. There is a probability that things won’t go exactly as we intended them to, but how we react to those unmet expectations can really shape the feelings around the event. [17:17] - Typically, a lot of the responsibility for a picture-perfect holiday is tied up in women’s work. Angela encourages people to look for ways to pull other members of the family in, so they can contribute something unique to the larger expectation. Also, make sure you take care of yourself. [19:45] - If someone in the family is really passionate about one of the traditions, one option is to enroll them and delegate that responsibility to them. Enrolling other people can expose just the amount of work that goes into certain aspects of the holidays. [22:40] - Positive boundaries are things we are going to do; negative boundaries are things we are not going to do. Boundaries are important so our focus remains on our intentions and feelings we hope to project, rather than getting weighed down in things we have to do. [24:54] - Being intentional in the right way leads to us being happier and less stressed during this holiday season. It can also help us have time to be who we are and do what we need to do. [27:23] - Our intentionality with this time of year and the holidays can help to lead us into a happier new year. Charlie challenges us to be clear about the ways we want to feel and how we can project that into the world.    Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group
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120: Q&A #6: Networking from a Place of Generosity, Project Post-Mortems, and Working in Harmony with Your Spouse
Our host, Charlie and his wife, Angela answer community members’ questions about networking, project post-mortems, and share real experiences of how they work together as a married couple.   Key Takeaways: [1:04] - As a solo entrepreneur, how do we go about figuring out how to be the one that gives instead of the one who takes? How forward can we be when offering our help? [2:06] - Think about how your personal values and principles can translate to your business practices. At the same time, think about how you can be forward about the specific kind of help you can provide, based on the knowledge of your career. [5:35] - Do you know of a methodology to archive or store learnings in order to serve as a knowledge base for other stakeholders within the business, specifically with post-mortems after projects are lost? How can it be used to upskill your staff and bring new people to the team? [6:25] - Make sure you have someone who will facilitate an after action review: what did we want to happen, what actually happened, and what do we want to do differently in the future? An honest conversation about how a project went is crucial for a beneficial project post-mortem. [9:57] - Make sure after you’ve reviewed a project, you put that information somewhere that you can access in the future. Before you start a new project, take time to re-read them so you can avoid making the same mistakes moving forward. [13:45] - How do you work in harmony as a married couple? How do you not let your entire life become about your work? [15:03] - Carve out time for you and your spouse as a couple, so you have a chance to be together outside of work, focusing on each other personally more than professionally. [18:30] - Angela and Charlie also have a practice where they don’t use their phones and also allow for transition time to move between work zone and couple zone. [22:18] - Discover your boundaries as an individual for work-related talk outside of business hours, and check in with your spouse or partner to establish a mutual understanding. [26:27] - When it comes to work performance, these types of conversations can get a little tricky. But it’s important to discuss them during business hours, rather than bringing them home into the personal realm. [29:00] - Continue to send in your questions on the Creative Giant Campfire or send your questions straight to Angela.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group The Small Business Lifestyle Confluence Igloo Evernote Google Drive Episode 117: Q&A 5 Angela@productiveflourishing.com
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119: Your Self-Talk Is Where Your Life Starts with Mary Fran Bontempo
Mary Fran Bontempo joins Charlie to discuss how aging can be a gift, and how to make words like change, fear, and fine not be dirty words. They also discuss how much of our identities is fixed by the stuff we accumulate.   Key Takeaways: [1:19] - Introduction to Mary Fran Bontempo and how she got started in her writing career. She talks about how her creativity grew from a really dark spot in her life. The fear and hesitance of her situation sparked her creative process. [2:30] - Many people who are in the “fall/mid-winter” stage of their lives are reluctant to pursue creativity. Why? We should embrace creativity throughout the many years of our lives. Yes, there may be many more things on our plates, but that doesn’t mean we can’t make time for something new. [4:15] - What would you say to someone who is unsure of where to start and how to keep up? We can choose to continue to evolve with new technology developments and try things out to see what works. [6:48] - Mindset around aging - how do we see it as a gift rather than a sentence? Mary Fran talks about a new way to define where we are now; sometimes we have to learn to disengage from the expectations of our “now” to break into something new. [8:49] - Mary offers three tips and strategies for parents wanting to lean out of the routines that are no longer as relevant to where they are now. [9:56] - Charlie follows up on that discussion with ideas about a few different types of dependency: negative codependency and interdependency. This relationship between child and parent can be scary for parents when it no longer exists in the same capacity. [12:18] - As the average lifespan is increasing, we have more time - before, while, and especially after - having kids, that has so much potential for becoming a time of creativity. [13:55] - What are some of the fears that prevent us from doing the things we know we need to do to continue progressing? This is especially applicable for young people. [18:02] - There are often a host of opportunities available to us. As we are moving forward in our lives, it may be more beneficial to make decisions that will keep you moving forward, rather than getting stuck waiting around for something to come along. You may end up opening more doors for yourself! [19:25] - Charlie discusses the shift from a “career world” to a “project world.” What does that mean for younger generations as well as older generations of entrepreneurs and forward thinkers? [23:20] - Change as a dirty word. Change often comes hand in hand with fear - we think it will wreak havoc on our lives, but Mary Fran encourages us to remember that we deal with change on a regular basis and we can handle it. This perspective can help carry us through bigger changes in our lives. [26:35] - We typically underestimate our own capabilities. How will we respond when we receive the “cosmic kick in the butt?” Our response can show us what the full range of what we are capable of - don’t get too comfortable. [28:48] - The dirty word fine. Mary Fran and Charlie discuss different uses of the word ‘fine’, and the pros and cons of accepting fine and also exploring new words to define a similar state. [31:47] - Charlie talks about some societal norms we encounter when talking about our current state. How do people typically respond when we share some of the things we’re grateful for, versus the things that bother us? [35:01] - The self-talk that we run through our head is a choice, and we can choose to use that to put something positive out into the world. Conversely, we can change our self-talk to encourage better attitudes for the things coming ahead, creating a flow between the subconscious and the conscious. This can have a great effect on how we feel about getting older and our place in the world. [38:13] - Mary Fran encourages an exercise to gather a group of friends and write an introduction or a statement, in the hopes that we will begin to regard ourselves the way our friends regard us. [41:47] - When we start letting some stuff go and refine what we want our space to look like, we can redefine what we want our lives to look like. Releasing some of the stuff in our lives can allow a great amount of growth moving forward. This holds true for material possessions as well as emotional baggage that can weigh us down. [47:04] - The way we live our lives now is different - pursuing experiences is becoming more important than pursuing material goods. And we do acquire stuff, we use it! [51:57] - We should strive to define ourselves on the basis of who we want to be, no matter our age or place in life. It all begins in the “six inches between your ears.” Be intentional in your self-talk.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group The Woman’s Book of Dirty Words - Mary Fran Bontempo The Upside of Your Dark Side - Todd Kashdan and Robert Biswas-Diener The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up - Marie Kondo Episode 20 with Jennifer Boykin Episode 15 with Lucy Pearce
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118: Shake It, Don’t Break It
Today’s episode is a requested reading of a previously published post on Productive Flourishing named “Shake It, Don’t Break It.” The key idea from this post is that you can walk to edge of the known world you see, and shake things up without completely breaking up and burning down everything you know and have built before that.   Key Takeaways: [0:53] - “We think too small, like the frog at the bottom of a well. He thinks the sky is only as big as the top of the well. If he surfaced, he would have an entirely different view.” - Mao Tse Tung. [1:09] - Charlie uses the above quote to describe how we as individuals often don’t see the full picture - there is so much more out there that we don’t see. [1:47] - If we limit ourselves to what we think we know or what we’ve seen, we are limiting ourselves from discovering new experiences. We sometimes have to step outside of our comfort zones to see what else there is to see. [2:55] - This can be scary not only for us as individuals, but also for our loved ones. We need to consider them when we prepare to take our leap of faith, and how we can convince them that there’s something new worth discovering on the other side. [3:30] - How can we shake up our world without breaking up our world? Remember that they’re not the same thing. Communicate why a particular change is needed to keep them along for the ride. [4:10] - Charlie challenges us to think about how we can shake things up without leaving too many things behind.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Productive Flourishing  
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117: Q&A #5: Delegation 101, High-Value Work, and Getting Back Into the Groove
Angela joins Charlie Gilkey answer your questions and discuss how to determine what to delegate in your business, how to focus on high-value work, what low prices say about your products and services, and what to do when your getting off your schedules and productivity schedules.   Key Takeaways: [1:15] - Open invitation to share your questions and suggestions for discussion on the Facebook group. [2:08] - How do I determine how and what to delegate in my business? How do you decide what low-value work is worth doing at all, and how do you determine which stuff to put off until a later time? [3:05] - Charlie suggests making a list to guide your decisions about delegations. Are you doing the same thing every week (routinely) that could be delegated to someone else? Consider projects versus routines. [7:04] - There are different levels of delegation: tasks, projects, and responsibilities. Ultimately, the goal should be to move toward delegating responsibilities, rather than delegating tasks. [12:09] - Routines and other frequent tasks would be ideal to delegate, while more involved projects may not be worth the time spent making sure someone else can do the project. Focus on what will allow you to do more high-value work. [14:25] - What can you delegate that gets you ten hours a week back? [15:18] - Framework for business endeavors: Cash flow, opportunity, visibility. Use these principles as a guide to prioritize business goals. [17:55] - Creative Cage Match! When all of your projects are pitted against each other, which one will be the first one that won’t get done? The last one left standing remains high priority. Completed projects should help to set up other projects. [20:54] - When you see something priced low, do you assume it’s going to be crappy? Or do you assume the person is racing to the bottom to compete with price instead of great content? [21:39] - Don’t assume people won’t pay a higher price for your product or service. There’s always a segment of customers that are willing to pay a different price - based on those who are interested in quality of content. [23:34] - There is very little relationship between price and value, although many people do make that correlation when considering their purchases. Make sure you’re not selling yourself short based on the quality of your product. [25:29] - Consider the placebo effect of pricing: once they’ve paid a certain amount, people will value something a lot more because they paid that amount, not necessarily because of the value of the product. [29:43] - Be confident in the value that you’re putting on the table. [30:42] - When you feel you’re getting out of cycles that support you, or you’re off your schedule, what do you do? What can we think about to get ourselves back on track? [31:54] - Charlie notices he’s off his cycle when he starts to feel in a slump productivity-wise. Contextualize your experience. If it is something that is happening over a prolonged period of time, you may need to re-evaluate something about your process to get back on track. [35:10] - Reset! Once you diagnose what the problem is, think about what changes you can make to increase your productivity. [38:52] - To ask more questions, join the Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group or directly e-mail Angela.   Mentioned in This Episode: Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Angela@productiveflourishing.com Fancy Hands Previous Q&A Podcasts: Episode 90 Episode 104 Episode 107 Episode 112 The One Thing - Gary Keller Three P’s of Pricing
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116: Learning to Learn and Express Yourself
This episode is going to be a conversation between Angela and me about different learning styles and really getting to the bottom of how you learn, how you process and how you polish. The reason we’re going through this is because we’re both doing a lot of different creative things and we’ve found ourselves either stuck, or in the flow and we wanted to share how we’re working through that. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:50] Charlie explains how periodic struggles in his writing and learning ways to get unstuck have given rise to the idea for this podcast. [3:21] The VARK modalities are brought up when talking about learning styles but these styles also apply to communication. [4.30] If you ever you find yourself stuck learning something, try switching modalities - write/draw/move/talk it out. [6:18] Charlie’s writing issue ended up being a great example of processing and expression style differences: he should have been drawing instead! [9:45] This goes to show you that sometimes you get stuck because you’re trying to express your ideas in the wrong style. [11:30] The three different ways to work through your creative process are conceptualisation, rough expression and polished expression. [12:39] Each of these three stages may require you to use different styles: you may ideate visually, rough orally and so on and so forth. [18:25] Sometimes, just switching modes will help you work through a jam and unstick your work. [21:35] You also have to realise that working on your creations in one style or another as well as your level of mastery of that medium will not make it “less than”. [26:05] When you’re not certain what style will best suit a particular activity, just try one, any one, it will help you to zero in on what works best. [28:36] When you have mastered a medium, be even more careful because your own belief that this is your strength might prevent you trying different avenues. [29:30] Our education system does not successfully foster different learning and communicative styles. [30:27] People are happiest when they are expressing themselves and learning what style is natural for you will help you move in that direction.   Mentioned in This Episode: The Small Business Life Cycle Momentum Planning Method VARK Learning Styles Communication Matchmaking Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group  
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115: Unlocking the MacGyver Secret with Lee Zlotoff
Remember MacGyver, the ingenious action-adventure hero from the 80’s who was able to do things like disarm bombs with a toothpick, swiss army knife and duct tape? MacGyver was a huge influence on me as a kid and his creator, Lee Zlotoff, joins me today to discuss the genesis of MacGyver, as well as the MacGyver secret—a simple process that can help you solve your toughest problems, because who wouldn’t want an inner MacGyver solving problems for them. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:00] Charlie introduces Mr. Zlotoff and his impressive television and film career as well as his philanthropic endeavours. [2:54] MacGyver was imagined in opposition to a lot of his contemporaries — what if our guy had no gun, no gadgets, nothing! [6:45] Mr. Zlotoff goes over his ongoing mission to bring MacGyver back through a television series and film but also in the form of The MacGyver Secret. [8:50] The method covers management tools taken from MacGyver: avoid conflict, turn what you have into what you need and do it all with humour and humility. [10:48] The issues coming up during this century are unlike any other concerns that humankind has faced before, the need for ingenuity is great. [12:20] If MacGyver were recreated today, Lee would first make him a woman, then he would integrate her to the new technological context and finally, add a sense of global consciousness. [14:46] The MacGyver Secret came about when Lee realised his best creative insight came out during specific routine activities, and he set out recreating the mental condition for this subconscious or “inner MacGyver” to appear. [18:04] Everybody has an inner MacGyver and the method teaches you the three steps required to access that part of you in a reliable manner. [19:44] Step one, write your question or problem down in longhand and pass it on to your inner MacGyver -- read it to yourself. [20:29] Step two is to go on with your day! Let your inner MacGyver incubate the problem. [22:01] Finally, after a few hours, start writing anything at all, and within 30 to 45 seconds the answers will flow from the tip of your pen. [23:18] Activities that prevent the incubation process: watching television, reading, conversation (in any form—email, text, etc.), and playing high action video games. [26:16] We are completely overloaded by information in this day and age and most of it will inhibit the incubation: you need a slightly physical, unimaginative task. [29:04] The trickiest part is trusting that you do have an inner MacGyver and that it can give you answers! [31:15] This method will work differently for personal emotional problems — mostly because you will need to ask more than once and the answers will take a little longer to come. [33:50] This part of your mind will never shut down, it is a constant and is processing your daily experiences. Opening dialogue with that part of you will vastly enrich your creative and problem solving toolset. [37:26] Lee Zlotoff’s closing challenge: start with the understanding that you have enormous resources at your disposal, you simply need to learn to open a dialogue with yourself.   Mentioned in This Episode: The MacGyver Secret MacGyver Global Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group
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114: Your Art is For you
Today’s episode is a requested reading of a previously published post on Productive Flourishing, named “Your Art is For You”. So many creatives and change makers get stuck because they feel torn between the art they want to create and the art others want. And by art, I mean that special medicine that only you can create, which may not be fine art and painting, it could be something you do in the world besides that. You’ve got to start by making art for you first.   Key Takeaways: [0:58] How many of your half done projects are stuck at the same spot? Did they halt when you started thinking about how to sell or share them? [2:30] Creative types don’t create because they want to make money, they create because they need to. [3:45] Yes, you do want to make money from your art, but it has to come from you first — you have to be interested and enjoy it. [4:30] Now go back to your half done projects and label them as “not for sale” or “just for me” and see what happens.   Mentioned in This Episode: Sarah Marie Lacey Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group
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113: Grief Is A Natural Part of Life
Today Angela joins me again for a jam and we’re talking about grief, transitions and health. This comes because we have gone through some death and grieving recently and it’s something that people ask Angela about a lot, and I do get questions sometimes, so we’re going to go ahead and do a jam about the subject. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:54] Charlie and Angela introduce the show with some personal insight on why they chose to address these often overlooked hard issues that do come up in life. [3:09] Angela opens up on her recent loss and the gifts and blessings that came with that process of passing and the importance of opening up a discussion about grief and loss. [5:07] Grief is often portrayed as a life shattering thing, and we rarely address smaller scale grief — a child going to college, or getting over who we thought we might be. [7:58] The way each person experiences grief is unique and very personal, and what may be a “big G” experience for you, could be a “small g” experience for another. [11:40] Because each person processes grief uniquely, the multitude of possible definitions is acknowledged even as a broader definition is offered. [14:14] The feeling of loss, in all of its forms, will be positively correlated to the energy and meaning that we have vested those people, things and concepts that we feel we’ve lost. [20:11] It’s important to note that it is perfectly normal if grief is never completely resolved, even if it is less frequent and painful, it may come up for years. [25:04] Unhealthy grief happens and can be fueled, among other things, sudden loss, remorse, lack of inner resources or unhealthy boundaries in dealing with grief. [35:50] Healthy versus unhealthy grieving could be defined by the act of processing versus not processing, the important thing is to stop and acknowledge the loss and begin a process. [39:50] Having rituals is very important and affords us a space in which to grieve. [41:21] Charlie and Angela touch on some ideas about what to do when you aren’t certain how to help someone when they are grieving. [42:50] We wait for crises and emergencies to find out who our friends are, but if we did that when it wasn’t an emergency, we would be better equipped to help them. [48:56] If someone grieving is able to ask for something specific, especially if they ask for time and space, it is important to respect it and to not take it personal. [53:39] Grief also impacts teens and children and they need help and support in a most tangible way because they're not yet emotionally mature. [56:00] Grief is a natural part of life — good and bad emotions are part of life — even if it isn’t easy.   Mentioned in This Episode: Episode 75 with Kathy Kortes-Miller Episode 58 with Christine Meekhof The 5 Love Languages Live Your Legend -- Scott Dinsmore Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group
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112: Q&A #4: Preventing Overwhelm, Dealing with a Bad Day, and Hiring When You Don’t Have the Cash
After seeing how much more fun it was to have Angela with me on the Q&A’s, we’ve decided that it’s the new standard. Today we answer questions people send in about preventing overwhelm when goal-setting, dealing with a bad day and hiring someone when you don’t have the immediate cash to do so. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:22] Q1 from Cheryl is how to plan out your yearly goals without getting overwhelmed. [1:58] Q1 Answer — You should aim to break down your annual goals into manageable chunks — quarterly objectives, monthly objectives, weekly projects and daily tasks. [5:18] The place we get overwhelmed is at the daily task level, all of the small to-do’s that have trickled down from our overarching goals. [6:25] Charlie touches on the importance of having a prioritized, manageable quantity of yearly goals to reach for. [17:59] Q2 from Jeremy is about what you can do to get over a bad day. [18:20] Q2 Answer — We tend not to take advantage of the freedom we have as entrepreneurs: sometimes you need to evaluate if there is anything you can do. [22:45] When you get into a funk, move around some stagnant things but stay away from big decisions, email conversations and social media. [25:05] Q3 from Corey is how to scale a team if you don’t have the immediate funds. [25:40] Q3 Answer — You need a business audit to target the aspects of your workload that people could take on to free you to go out and generate more money. [37:07] There is a measure of trust you need to have in your business growth potential, a fear of failure will hold you back. [40:06] Every small business should look at financing options, you might need to leverage your revenue against a line of credit at some point. [44:00] Thank you to Cheryl, Jeremy and Corey for contributing to this Q&A with their insightful Qs.   Mentioned in This Episode: The Tuckman Model 12 Simple Ways to be Present 21 Ways to Quickly Short Circuit a Funk The ONE thing by Gary Keller The 2017 Momentum Planners Bundle Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group
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111: How to Live a Good Life with Jonathan Fields
Jonathan Fields joins me for a second time today to discuss his new book, How to Live a Good Life. The journey of writing this book has been a particularly interesting one, for the process required him to step into a very uncomfortable role at the same time as it required him to immerse himself in literature that he had dismissed. We discuss this evolution as well as the places lot of people struggle with living a good life. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:54] Charlie introduces Jonathan and his media venture project, the “Good Life Project”. [3:45] The shift from writing about entrepreneurship and the creative process to a style more akin to personal development literature. [6:40] The journey of writing was transformative in itself, both for the content and nature of the book as well as for the author. [8:05] Wisdom and the capacity for reflexion really does seem to increase with each passing year. [9:00] Jonathan admits to always having had a negative bias in terms of personal development literature. [11:04] “How to Live a Good life” both embraces and diverges from the more theologically inclined books in the field. [14:15] Jonathan explains that this may be his most personal book yet, the one that conveys his voice in the most intimate way. [20:05] As are attorneys and philosophers, host and author are trained to use language to beguile and obscure things, a training that must be deconstructed to connect more authentically with the audience. [21:05] At one point in your career it becomes more important to actually change people’s lives rather than change the world. [24:41] Jonathan touches on how this book was many many years in the making and that the what he initially sold to his publisher was not “How to Live a Good Life”. [27:20] Despite his initial reluctance for the genre, Jonathan had to read massive amounts of self help literature, to better position his own book and serve his audience. [30:57] The difference between explanatory and exploratory styles of writing as well as the creative constraints required by certain genres are explored. [34:00] Although genre structures and writing guidelines are generally followed, Jonathan expands on the importance of going his own way for this book. [40:00] Peanuts!! [40:29] Of the three buckets: vitality, connection and creativity, which tend to suffer first for creative types? [44:45] The vitality bucket, as you age, may be the most challenging to replenish as your body’s needs evolve and change. [49:19] Jonathan hints at some of the ideas he wants to delve into for his coming projects, including the relationship between money and happiness. [54:50] Ultimately, all a guide can do is point to the different categories of things that have made people happy and encouraging you to try them and see. [57:34] The challenge is issued to “Give Thirty”: in the next 24 hours, take 30 opportunities you have to give or to help somebody in less than 30 seconds.   Mentioned in This Episode: Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert The Good Life Project Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group
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110: What I’m Here to Do
Today’s episode is a reading of a previously published post on Productive Flourishing named “What I’m Here to Do”. The post shares some stories that have informed why I show up in the world the way I do — I’m a bridge builder that helps people flourish. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [00:46] Follow Charlie as he remembers his arrival at the elite United-States Military Academy (West Point) and the leadership lesson he picked up from the yelling cadet. [03:55] A dangerous search and rescue mission at boy scout camp sets up the tone for understanding what it is that Charlie does. [12:08] How years of experience gathered through teaching philosophy, as a logistics officer in the army and as an entrepreneur, have given Charlie the broad understanding required to build effective bridges. [14:25] If canned answers will not do for you, unconventional, tailor-made, human scale bridge building is what Productive Flourishing offers.   Mentioned in This Episode: Sanebox.com/Giant Productive Flourishing West Point Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group
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109: No One Size Fits Every Influencer with Jason Van Orden
In today’s episode, Jason Van Orden joins me and shares what he’s learned about influence and helping others become top influencers in their field. Given that we often teach what we most need to learn, we also discuss what his work has revealed for him and the surprising tensions that have come up for him on his thought leadership journey. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [00:48] Charlie introduces Jason, summarizing his vast experience teaching and studying the psychology and strategies used by successful internet influencers. [02:12] Charlie opens up the discussion with Jason about what influence actually is, and how it differs from manipulation. [06:57] Because of hyper connectivity and information overload, people need to step up and become influencers in order to facilitate the organisation of knowledge in meaningful ways. [12:06] How the increase in individual generated content on the internet (“noise”) forces people to find their own unique voice, and fosters creativity. [18:12] What are some of the first steps to take when people want to come out as an influencer? [22:00] The difference between analytically understanding someone and understanding them emotionally. [27:30] Oftentimes, we teach about the things we really need to learn — Charlie asks Jason how teaching about influencing is helping him. [31:03] The more experience you gain, the more challenges you take on and the more you end up dealing with the imposter syndrome — you need to cut yourself some slack and move through it. [40:45] Jason shares how he was recently reminded of the importance of being engaged and continuing to innovate, even if change is intimidating. [48:15] There is little talk about sufficiency in business — where your business meets your needs and doesn’t need to continuously grow and scale. [50:20] What is the most surprising or unanticipated challenge Jason is currently facing? [53:40] Remember that you need to be okay with the fact that there will not be a one size fits all answer and that you need a strategy that fits you.   Mentioned in This Episode: Sanebox.com/Giant Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Episode 14: Write, Publish, Repeat With Johnny B. Truant Episode 5: Making Changes With Jonathan Fields The Hero’s Journey by Joseph Campbell Kant's Categorical Imperative To Sell is Human by Daniel H. Pink Louder than words by Todd Henry The Fascination Advantage by Sally Hogshead Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Bossypants by Tina Fey
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108: How to Align Your Goals and Projects with Your Seasonal Energy
Angela joins me on today’s episode to learn how to align your goals and projects with your seasonal energy. This is a bit of a follow up from episode 102 with Megan Roop, based on questions readers have been asking us. But, it’s also prompted by the transition from summer to fall that we’re currently in, here in the Northern hemisphere. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [00:52] SaneBox will save you hours of time, and bring you peace of mind. Try it out with the link below! [01:55] Charlie welcomes Angela to the show and introduces some fresh approaches being considered for the podcast. [03:35] As we approach October, Charlie and Angela’s energies tend to shift. Today they address some relevant questions on how that looks to them and ways to acknowledge those changes. [08:05] It’s key to make note of energy shifts within a team, as each member adds another variable to the energy dynamic. Talk to your team about it! [08:45] Institutions and cultures have based schedules around these energy cycles for a long time, and for good reason. [10:30] Creative Giant listener, Laura, asks Charlie to expand on the idea of living with the seasons as discussed on Episode 102 with Megan Roop. [17:09] Angela notes that late August and early October is a great time to leverage Charlie’s higher energy and have him work more with the team. [18:20] It’s important to consider our monthly cycles, including open conversations about women’s menstrual cycles, as well as recognizing the moon cycle’s impact on us. [25:25] We tend to approach the way that we plan and make commitments as if we were robots — as if in a slice of time in the future we’re going to feel a certain way. [28:45] For those way down on the “woo” spectrum, Charlie cuts the horsesh!t and gets down to the science! [30:25] Nadia from the campfire sessions asks how Charlie and Angela personally prioritize activities, and especially schedule time for restorative activities.  [38:57] Angela touches on how she prepares for anniversaries of significant events that come about at certain times of the year. [43:20] If this conversation is interesting to you, please let Charlie and Angela know and they’ll jam another session on our “seasons of life”.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox/Giant Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group Episode 102: The Nourishing Nature of Being in Nature with Megan Roop
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107: Q&A #3: Success Packs, Goal-setting, and Leadership Lessons-Learned
Angela joins me for this Q&A to discuss how to form a success pack, how to brainstorm your goals, and the biggest leadership lesson I’ve learned in business. We made the switch to Angela joining me on this because it’s way more fun doing these with someone else and you’ll soon hear how much better the answers are. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:47] Clean up your Inbox with SaneBox! [2:20] Q1 from Kat is on how to form a success pack. [4:55] Q1 Answer — Make it super easy for your guide, have a clear project, have a clear goal, show why they’re relevant, and then be clear in what you’re asking them to do. [14:56] Charlie’s tip on finding a guide for your success pack — make sure you have an aligned mission with that person, otherwise they shouldn’t even be your guide. [15:32] How to find a peer for your success pack. [20:08] Q2 from Shanna is on how to brainstorm your goals. [22:17] Why mind mapping is a great tool, especially for creative people. [25:51] Q2 Answer — Separate the creative mess from the analytical processing, and recognize it’s going to take multiple passes. [32:14] Q3 from Patricia is on the biggest leadership lessons Charlie has learned in business. [32:42] Q3 Answer — Biggest lesson Charlie has learned is how to be authentic and transparent with teammates and the value of giving positive feedback. [38:36] How having a feelings-conscious business means you have to be ready to have a conflict-free business at the same time. [42:24] Thank you to Kat, Shanna and Patricia for contributing to this Q&A with their insightful Qs.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com How to Write Brief Emails Without Being a Jerk Mind Mapping by Tony Buzan MindNode MindMeister How to Set SMART Goals Asana Hackpad
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106: Why Productivity is Bunk
Thanks so much for joining me on this quick episode. On this solo riff, I talk about why productivity gets a bad rap, and how instead of focusing on all the reasons why productivity is bunk, we’re better off focusing on finishing the stuff that matters. Ready? Let’s do this!      Key Takeaways: [0:25] SaneBox can help sort your mail for you, so email can finally make sense again! [1:28] Why productivity gets a bad rap these days! [2:12] Why people feel torn between being productive & enjoying quality time with family. [2:32] What it means to be a thriving person. [3:03] What separates talented creatives from everybody else? [3:39] All the reasons for why productivity is bunk are wrong. So, what is productivity really about? [4:21] Let’s not focus on why others think productivity is bunk and focus instead on finishing the stuff that matters! [5:03] Until next time, talk less about productivity, start finishing the stuff that matter, and stand tall!   Mentioned in This Episode: www.SaneBox.com Creative Giant Campfire Facebook Group
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105: Your Art Leaves A Mark with Arna Baartz
In today’s episode, Arna Baartz joins me to share her journey, from a child of creative parents to an artist who teaches people to become more emotionally intelligent. Along the way, we discuss how she weaves in being a mother of 8 children, and her discovery and exploration of the art of Kundalini. Ready? Let’s do this!    Key Takeaways: [0:48] SaneBox can help sort your mail for you, so email can finally make sense again! [1:50] Find out more about Arna Baartz. [3:19] How did growing up in an artistic family influence Arna’s artist career? [9:56] Arna talks on the art of Kundalini, how she found her way to it, why she calls her art Kundalini, and other sources of her artistic expression. [18:25] Arna embraces the mistakes that happen in her art―instead of trying to cover them up. She explains why! [24:55] What is emotional intelligence to Arna? [26:34] Why would we want to become more emotionally intelligent? [31:42] How does Arna maintain her creative spirit while also running a business and raising 8 children? [35:41] If Arna could go back to one moment in her creative career and do something different―what would that moment be & what would she do differently? [37:20] What the one message Arna would like to leave the listeners with.   Mentioned in This Episode: www.artofkundalini.com www.arnabaartz.com @ArnaBaartzArtist on Facebook Episode 15: Cultivating Creativity During Motherhood with Lucy Pearce Episode 36: Write Your Own Future with Ali Luke
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104: Q&A #2: On Triggers, Resistance, and Not Being Where You Want to Be
Thanks for joining us today! In this special episode of The Creative Giant Show, Charlie does a Q&A session with topics ranging from: triggers, the root of people’s resistance, and how to reconcile one’s innate nature with what seems to be an almost unnatural act of being an employee. Are you ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [00:54] SaneBox can help sort your mail for you, so email can finally make sense again! [01:57] Nadia emailed and asked for some follow up from my article, The Guided Business Review. She asked, “What are the triggers to let you know you're facing one of these challenges? Triggers - can you explain with some examples?” [04:56] The second question is about uprooting your own resistance. MeMuna asked, “Specifically, I’m interested in gaining clarity about the perspective you talk about in the quote from the article, ‘It’s hard to beat a monster who’s fueled by the very energy you’re trying to muster to beat it’.” [08:08] The third question comes from another Nadia. “I’d like to know as an entrepreneur and Creative Giant, how does one reconcile one’s innate nature with what seems an almost unnatural act of being an employee, and working for someone else? Specifically, when this is a situation of one’s own choosing due to it leading to the fulfillment of a larger goal that does fit in with one’s nature. But, in the moment, on a day-to-day basis, seems to fly in the face of who you are and what you stand for.” [12:10] To have your questions appear on the next Q&A, email us at support@productiveflourishing.com!   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant ProductiveFlourishing.com/guided-business-review/ ProductiveFlourishing.com/are-you-the-root-of-your-own-resistance/ Man’s Search for Meaning Email: support@productiveflourishing.com
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103: Create Art That Doesn’t Need a Signature with Srinivas Rao
Srinivas Rao returns to The Creative Giant Show to jam about his new book, Unmistakeable: Why Only Is Better Than Best. We dive right in and discuss how ‘only’ isn’t enough, how the myth of easy creativity keeps us from doing our unmistakeable work, and the neurotic creative process the Unmistakeable Team goes through to ship their work. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [00:52] SaneBox can save you hours of time by sorting your email for you! [01:55] Introduction to Charlie’s guest, Srinivas Rao. [03:05] There are two main drivers from Unmistakeable - Srinivas unpacks these concepts. [05:45] Ask yourself, “What is the emotional response that I’m trying to elicit from an audience?” [07:00] We’re at an inflection point in our history where we have the ability to approach things as artists, and be more expressed and personal in what we create. [07:30] There’s an odd paradox - the barrier is so low, yet the bar is so high. [09:10] What motivates folks that don’t need to work to keep working? [11:58] How many days should you invest in something before you should quit? [13:02] At first we make our habits, and then our habits make us. [13:18] What is meant by deliberate practice? [17:20] It’s not that hard to be third string. [19:30] Srinivas walks us through his personal and company’s creative processes. [24:15] The secret to winning every time is to calculate expectations and exceed them. [25:49] Frequency is a key to becoming unmistakable. How does Srinivas thread frequency and quality into his process? [28:00] Which principles from the book does Srinivas find most challenging to practice? [31:39] Srinivas shares his hardest challenges of writing long-form content while writing the new book. [36:03] What is the one thing that Srinivas wants listeners to take away?   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant Unmistakable Creative Episode #3 with Seth Godin Leave a rating for the show!
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102: The Nourishing Nature of Being in Nature with Megan Roop
Megan Roop joins Charlie today to talk about how quiet adventures helped her find herself battling the pursuit of being perfect. Along the way, she’s woven her experience with the Peace Corps, selling outdoor equipment, teaching yoga, and helping people overcome eating disorders, into a unique body of work. Listen in as we discuss the nourishing nature of being in nature, and how honoring the seasons helps you honor your changing nature.   Key Takeaways: 00:58 SaneBox advertisement. 02:00 Who is Megan Roop and what is Quiet Adventures? 02:55 Megan shares her path to starting the company, and how she came to reconcile seemingly disparate ideas of finance and personal growth into a culmination of activities  that work for a greater good. 09:29 For many years, Megan devoted her energy to achieving “perfection” as a woman, that led to struggling with an eating disorder and eventual burnout. She shares how that weaves into her current endeavors. 11:11 When did Megan recognize the socialization of women was truly impacting her personally? 13:56 Just because society tells us there’s a way to be living life doesn’t mean that it’s going to work for you. Charlie and Megan elaborate. 16:05 What are some of the ways Megan has worked with women getting clear on what they’re willing to accept, and what they need to build a boundary around? 20:00 When women strip away the nonessentials, and get to the core of who the are, they start to see they do have gifts and they have a lot to give. 21:00 What tends to happen when out in nature that helps women connect with themselves? How does connecting to the seasons help one seeing the changing nature in life? 24:15 Women and creatives have internal seasonal changes frequently, and embracing that can make life easier to navigate. 27:36 What are some of the small ways people can be more intentional about their connection to nature? 30:04 Charlie opens a dialogue on the intersection of community and nature. 31:30 The Upside of Your Darkside suggests we have a comfort addiction. Do humans deeply bond over comfort as they do in times of struggle? 34:28 Megan shares a story of a moment when she realized she was in the right place, doing the right thing. 37:30 Contrastly, Charlie asks for a negative, pivotal moment on Megan’s journey. 39:20 What is Megan’s most unanticipated challenge currently? 41:00 What is the big takeaway Megan wants people to remember? 42:00 For more great info on connecting with nature, check out Episode #80 Reclaiming Wild Men with Jonathan Mead and #15 with Cultivating Creativity During Motherhood with Lucy Pearce   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant Quiet Adventures From Wood to Water The Upside of Your Darkside Episode 80: Reclaiming Wild Men with Jonathan Mead Episode 15: Cultivating Creativity During Motherhood with Lucy Pearce  
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101: Get Up and Take Care of Your People
In this special edition of The Creative Giant Show, Charlie reads from the Productive Flourishing blog post, Get Up and Take Care of Your People. This gripping story tells of how a combat experience in the military revealed to him both parallels and valuable lessons in leadership, which apply today in the battleground of business.   Key Takeaways: [00:51] SaneBox™ Email Management‎ advertisement. [01:32] Visit SaneBox.com/Giant for $25 credit on top of the 2 week free trial! [01:52] Charlie reads his popular blog post, Get Up and Take Care of your People.   Mentioned in This Episode: Offer: SaneBox/Giant Blog: Get Up and Take Care of Your People
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100: Andrea J. Lee Interviews Charlie Gilkey
The tables are turned in this episode, as Andrea J. Lee puts me in the spotlight. The questionnaire becomes the questioned. This one is coming right after I started sharing more of my thoughts on race, identity, equality and justice. So, a good bit of the conversation focuses on how we might show up as our full selves in our work. If you find yourself at a loss for how to engage with the world, while still doing your work, you might find some useful ideas in here. And yes, it’s really weird to create the intro for your own interview - I’m just saying, we live in interesting times! Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:03] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #100. [2:06] Charlie introduces Andrea J. Lee, who interviews him on this episode. [3:01] Andrea joined us on episode #91, which resulted in her volunteering to this reverse podcast interview. [4:24] What does it mean to be A Creative Giant, in the times we are in? [7:59] Charlie shares his internal processes and the idea of creative constipation. [10:36] The external and internal outcomes of the discourse Charlie is creating around social change. [15:31] Charlie’s social media responses indicate he has touched a nerve on how to have discourse. [16:26] How lack of dialogue gets us in no-win positions. [19:32] The discourse about discourse is one of the most opaque things we have. How is Charlie’s background as a soldier influencing his approach? [23:47] There are the harms we cause by doing things, and there are the harms we cause by not doing things. [27:16] The fundamental and weird aspects of Humanity.  [29:23] Getting stuck in epic goals. [32:11] What does Charlie think about the Language Police? [40:51] How do we expand these great ideas? How do we go ‘there’? [46:55] How to lean into gathering, rather than isolating; and how to flourish in creative partnerships. [52:55] Charlie’s final thoughts on this episode’s topic!   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant www.facebook.com/groups/PFCampfire/
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099: How to Make Better Learning Experiences with Breanne Dyck
Whether we’re content creators, managers, leaders or customer service reps, we’re all in the teaching business. Breanne Dyck joins me again, to continue the conversation about making better learning experiences that work for our learners and work for us. Hint - it’s not about the content. A quick plug here - come join us at The Creative Giant Campfire, our free Facebook group.  We’ll be having conversations about podcast episodes there as well as other micro-post prompts, and the occasional Facebook Live Broadcast. You can find it by searching “creative giant campfire” on Facebook. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:04] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #99. [2:04] Breanne joined us on episode #30, which is definitely worth listening to. [4:53] Let’s talk Before and After Infobesity [aka information overload]. [11:57] Breanne is experimenting with Facebook Live right now & shares tips on how to get people to take action after a video. [15:12] Breanne explains Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning. [16:48] How to get into that higher level learning zone in the quick slices of time we have available. [24:31] It’s not about content, it’s about context and what you’re gonna do within that context.    [29:27] What’s the next wave in the online space?  [35:20] Do’s & don’ts of the current state of learning. Breanne shares many insightful tips here. [46:47] Let’s talk about problems consultants run into and transmedia content production. [55:18] Pick up a game, teach it to someone & have fun, because it’s the best vehicle for learning how to make learning work.    Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant mnibconsulting.com Breanne Dyck on The Creative Giant Episode #30 Bloom’s taxonomy How the World Sees You by Sally Hogshead Million Dollar Consulting by Alan Weiss
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098: Which Creative Entrepreneur Type Are You? with Lisa Robbin Young
In this episode, Lisa Robbin Young and I discuss the blog post she wrote for Productive Flourishing on the 3 Types of Creative Entrepreneurs. Even if you don’t consider yourself creative or an entrepreneur, this is worth the listen because we’re really talking about different modes of creativity and why it’s important to lean into the kind of creative that you are. And by the way, if you’re human, you are creative. There’s also a discussion happening on this in our free Facebook group, The Creative Giant Campfire. Come join us there if you’d like to stand tall together with other Creative Giants. You can find it by searching creative giant campfire on Facebook. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:07] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #98. [2:13] Find out more about Lisa Robbin Young, founder of Ark Entertainment Media, a business incubator for creative entrepreneurs. [3:45] Lisa shares how creating her business emerged from a personal business problem. [8:20] There are 3 primary creative types: chaotic, linear and fusion; and then there are the cusp types. [10:10] Take Lisa’s quiz - What’s Your Creative Freedom Entrepreneur Type? Chaotic, Fusion, or Linear? [15:43] How to notice your creative mode switching and be aware of the support you need when you’re doing your creative projects. [18:53] Discover the strengths and disadvantages of each creative type - linear, chaotic and fusion. [30:18] The power of knowing, embracing and leaning into your creative type along the spectrum. [36:33] What would Lisa say to someone who comes to her with the problem of being a certain creative type and feeling they’re in the wrong career? [42:47] What’s the main reason Lisa calls this “the creative entrepreneur spectrum”? [44:07] Lisa’s challenge on the next step to take after listening to this episode.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant The Secret Watch by Lisa Robbin Young The Fine Line by Lisa Robbin Young A Whole New Mind by Daniel Pink Take Lisa’s Quiz: What’s Your Creative Freedom Entrepreneur Type? Chaotic, Fusion, or Linear?
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097: You Can Be More Than One Thing with Dusti Arab
A common growing pain for Creative Giants is the pressure to be just one thing in the world. To just be a doctor or a writer or a programmer or CO or whatever it is. The truth of it is that we’re all multi-dimensional, so resisting that only leads to us living less rich lives. Dusti Arab joins me today to share her Creative Giant journey and how she’s weaving it all together. A quick plug here, a quick plug - we just opened up the Creative Giant Campfire, our free Facebook Group. We’ll be having conversations about podcast episodes at the campfire, so come join us there if you’d like to stand tall together with other Creative Giants. You can find it by searching “Creative Giant Campfire” on Facebook. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:14] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #97. [2:16] Learn more about Dusti Arab, the CEO and Creative Director of thinkCHARM. [4:29] How Dusti got started in Copywriting and secured her first gig. [7:50] The difference between copywriting and ghostwriting. [12:55] Dusti talks Princess Parties. [16:54] Dusti shares her brand story. [20:25] Let’s talk 3-5 years from now. [23:34] People put too much pressure on themselves to meet these arbitrary deadlines. [25:49] Dusti’s biggest and most unanticipated challenges. [31:19] Changing gears is OK!   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant Creative Giant Campfire on Facebook thinkCHARM Dusti Arab @dustiarab on Instagram
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096: The Power of Simplicity in Organizations with Ken Segall
Peter Droppers said, the only things that evolve by themselves in an organization are disorder, friction, and malperformance. In a similar vein, it seems that businesses and organizations naturally tilt towards complexity, much to the dismay and frustration of the people and those who interact with them. You can’t beat complexity with more complexity. Ken Segall joins me today to share how leaders have to think simple to counteract complexity in their organizations. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:03] Learn more about Ken Segall, author of The New York Times bestseller Insanely Simple and the new sequel, Think Simple. [3:14] What inspired the creation of Think Simple following Insanely Simple? [6:21] What is it about simplicity that makes it so hard for organizations to stick with or cling to? [10:23] Why simple solutions or simple creative efforts are typically overlooked. [15:45] What has surprised Ken about big companies and simplification? [21:08] Hear about Ken’s experience with writing Think Simple. [30:03] Ken shares his view on what made Steve Jobs special. [31:58] The 85% solution for beating complexity.  [36:51] The one thing Ken wants listeners to remember about him and his body of work.   Mentioned in This Episode: Ken Segall Books by Ken Segall Think Simple Insanely Simple Brian Hartzer, Westpac CEO and Huge Fan of Simplicity Steve Jobs
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095: Grow and Communicate In a Creative Partnership
There are two myths about being a successful creative that get us into a lot of troub. One, that doing it by yourself is better and two, that having a creative partner would make life so much easier. It turns out that neither is true, at least for most people. Leah Heinz and Naz Murphy join me today to discuss how their uncomfortable friendship is the source of their personal and professional growth. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:52] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #95.  [1:58] Charlie introduces Leah & Naz, co-founders of The Connection Effect.  [4:59] The story of how Leah & Naz started a business together. [13:08] Realizing there are individual differences in the way one works in the world. [24:08] Recognizing growth moments and overcoming challenging times.  [31:20] How to have a great business relationship and face the differences in any relationship. [37:55] Reconciling your different money stories in a business partnership. [44:33] The beauty of a creative partnership. [49:17] Being outcome-focused and individual shifts in energy can be helpful with switches in responsibilities. [57:56] Changing their brand name from The Ripple to The Connection Effect. [63:59] Leah and Naz offer a key piece of advice on having a creative partnership that works.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant The Connection Effect The Connection Effect on Facebook Live Your Legend
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094: How to Pick Yourself and Put Your Art Out There with Seth Godin
Today’s episode is a rerun of one of my favorite episodes, episode 3 with Seth Godin. We’re doing a rerun today for several reasons: 1) I wanted to share some of our past episodes, that were fantastic, with new listeners who may not have scrolled all the way to the bottom of the episode list to see this one; 2) I think it’s time for everyone to reconsider how they’re not picking themselves; and 3) I wanted to remind people who are thinking about putting their art out there, whether their art is a podcast, a blog post, a book, a new initiative at work, music, or whatever - that it always amounts to just putting it out there and then doing it again. We have come a long way with The Creative Giant Show, so much so that the audio and my discomfort in this episode makes me cringe, but the chief thing is that we started and I’m so grateful for everyone for sticking with us. As always, I hope the content and the example help you pick yourself and get your art out there. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:37] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #94. [2:54] Find out the story behind episode 3 with Charlie’s mentor from afar, and long-time hero Seth Godin. [8:32] How to Pick yourself. [16:17] Seth asks - “What are you going to do tomorrow that’s going to make you more connected to what you’re doing today?” [18:14] What it takes to be a genius.  [19:51] What was it about The Icarus Deception that scared Seth? [24:50] Why people are afraid of being successful.  [30:06] Seth believes one way we get in trouble is by misunderstanding success. [32:47] How to use a given feeling to motivate yourself. [35:35] Seth’s final words of wisdom.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant Seth Godin TED Talk by Elizabeth Gilbert: Your elusive creative genius Books by Seth Godin
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093: How Sitting with Stillness Catalyzes Growth with Kristoffer Carter
While a lot of career paths aren’t linear, Creative Giants in particular often seem to have dramatically, nonlinear career progressions. One of the reasons for this is that we’re often actually pursuing multiple passions or growth edges at once. Kristoffer Carter (K.C.) joins me today to share his journey from a corporate sales guy to creative powerhouse and back to a corporate catalyst for mindfulness. It’s a wild journey but that’s a bit par for the course with K.C. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:57] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #93. [1:58] Who is Kristoffer Carter (aka K.C.)? [4:42] How did Charlie challenge K.C. when he thought he had to quit his job at the Good Life Project? [8:48] What is Kriya Yoga and how has it helped K.C. focus on the good? [11:53] K.C. on his spiritual practice, his meditation teaching, cumulative deposit and compounding return.  [15:18] K.C. talks about having had 3 jobs and realizing that he doesn’t need to be “all these things to all these people.” [19:28] How does K.C. negotiate those over-reaches? [21:52] Time to go on a spiritual sabbatical! K.C. shares the story. [24:50] K.C. shares a little bit about the time he took a sabbatical. [29:45] If he only had to choose one of the 3 core programs from the Camelot Culture Group, which one would K.C. focus on and why? [32:16] What about what K.C. is going through right now most terrifies or challenges him? [34:12] Looking back, what did K.C. think was going to be really hard that turned out not be as difficult as he thought it would be? [35:37] K.C.’s main message from this episode.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant Good Life Project Centro This Epic Life Camelot Culture Group Autobiography of a Yogi by P. Yogananda
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092: Be More With Less with Courtney Carver
The pursuit of happiness is often tied to the acquisition of more stuff. But we should instead be asking how the stuff in our lives prevents us from being happy, creative and connected to the ones we love. Courtney Carver, from bemorewithless.com, joins me to discuss how simplicity and minimalism is a path to love and freedom. It’s not about letting go but getting back. She also prompts me into reefing about why we need more diversity in the productivity and minimalist spaces. So you might find that interesting if you’ve ever wondered about it. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:06] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #92. [2:10] Who is Courtney Carver? [3:42] How did Courtney’s journey toward simplicity and minimalism work for her? [6:03] What is meant by minimalism & simplicity in the context of today’s discussion? [9:49] Project 333 is a minimalist fashion challenge. Courtney elaborates. [16:40] “If I let all of that go, then who am I?” is a scary question that can surface when you dig deep enough. [21:19] Courtney believes that simplicity is the way back to love. [23:41] What to do when you can’t buy yourself out of your suffering.  [30:27] Women vs. men in the simplicity/minimalism space. [33:22] Women vs. men in the productivity space - is there a problem? [40:03] Minimalism is not about giving up, it’s about getting back! There is a lot of ‘getting rid of things’ but it’s to make space for the things that you care about. [43:28] Looking for that inspiration to spark the start of your minimalist journey and wondering where to start? [46:10] Courtney’s one message for listeners: simplicity will bring you back to love if you give it a chance.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant Be More With Less Be More With Less on Facebook Courneycarver.com Project 333 The Life Changing Magic of Tidying UP, Book by Marie Kondo The More of Less, Book by Joshua Becker Colin Wright Tammy Strobel Minimalist.com
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091: Be Brave and Listen Within with Andrea Lee
It’s easy for coaches to not walk their talk. Especially, since we are so focused on transformation and transitions. While the outcome of transformations and transitions are great, the process isn't comfortable for anyone, including the coaches who facilitate said growth. Andrea Lee joins me today to share her transition from one of the top pioneering business coaches to a blank_er_ slate as a humanistic writer. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:00] Thank you to SaneBox for sponsoring episode #91. [2:07] Who is Andrea Lee? [5:49] Back to 1998 and how Andrea’s career transpired. [8:40] What’s changed in the coaching world from the client’s perspective? Andrea weighs in on the pros & cons. [10:37] Back to 1998 and what happened after Andrea got hired as a customer service rep. [12:15] What is the life time membership model created by Thomas Leonard? What happened to this lifetime membership after his passing? [15:11] One of Andrea’s main takeaways after Thomas’s passing is that every day counts.  [17:37] How did Thomas’s passing propel her towards becoming a thought leader? [20:23] What about sabbaticals between Multiple Streams and Thought Partners? [24:43] Andrea’s piercing thoughts right now! [28:10] Andrea speaks to the tension that she describes as “a big giant co-dependence mess”. [33:54] A discussion on resetting relationship dynamics and resetting our own understanding of how we relate to the world. [38:45] Andrea feels very clean and settled about her essence. [40:30] Have you read “In The Name of Identify” by Amin Maalouf? [44:16] How is Andrea’s Rubik’s cube spinning for her right now? [47:16] Andrea is writing something else right now but it’s very raw at the moment. She shares more about this new work. [51:49] What’s the most unanticipated challenge Andrea is facing right now? [54:06] Andrea’s main message is to be brave and listen within.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant Thomas Leonard Multiple Streams of Coaching Income, Book by Andrea J. Lee Tara Gentile’s Quiet Power Strategy In The Name of Identity, Book by Amin Maalouf We Need to Talk by Andrea J. Lee
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090: Q&A - How to Plan Your Day Based On Your Energy Levels (+ more)
This is our first Q & A episode and I’m excited about it. In today’s episode I discuss: 1) creative ways to use the results from your productivity heat map, 2) how I suggest people approach heat mapping when their schedule is largely determined by somebody else, and 3) what tools I use for blogging. At the end of the episode I’ll let you know a few of the other questions I’m going to be answering in the next Q & A so keep your ears open for that. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:56] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #90. [2:00] What’s going on with the format of the show? [6:11] Question #1 from Jennifer - What are some creative ways to use the results from your productivity heat map? [7:59] Think about the 4 different types of blocks you might have throughout your day - Creative, Social or Service, Admin, and Recovery. [9:05] What’s the schedule sorting game and when should you play it?  [10:35] Basically, you plan your day based upon the different blocks & you use those blocks very seriously. [16:30] Question #2 from Laura - How does Charlie suggest to approach heat mapping when your schedule is largely determined by somebody else? [18:32] Charlie's first tip is to un-schedule a day from your schedule. [20:22] Charlie’s second tip is to separate what’s on your schedule with how you actually feel. [22:25] Bottom line on what to do when you don’t have autonomy over your schedule? Listen in for the communication piece you can steal and use with your workplace. [25:23] Question #3 from Patricia - What tools does Charlie use for blogging? [26:22] Writing tools: TextMate or Lightroom, then copied them into WordPress. [28:17] Charlie uses an Idea Garden to capture blog post ideas. [29:05] Another tool is the Blog Post Calendar which you can download for free. [30:04] Charlie uses Jetpack by WordPress and Google Analytics to keep track of stats. [31:21] Charlie catalogs posts mostly by memory. [32:05] Social media tools: The native platforms like Twitter, Facebook, then Buffer and now Edgar.  [33:25] What about refreshing and recycling social media content? [37:36] A recap of the tools: Google Docs, Jetpack for WordPress Stats or Google Analytics, Blog Post Calendar, Edgar, and Rainmaker. [38:11] Big thanks to Jennifer Layton, Laura Hackle and Patricia Bravo for their great questions. [38:21] Coming up on the next Q & A: Examples of triggers & why they matter, how Charlie worked through with what needed to happen with the Live Your Legend transition, and maybe one of your questions which you can email to charlie@prductiveflourishing.com. [38:39] If you liked this episode or the show in general, please leave a review or rating on iTunes to help us reach more people. Go to bit.ly/creativegiantshowfaq for a walkthrough on how to do this!       Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant @CharlieGilkey on Twitter Episode 47: The Future of the Creative Giant Show Get more done in less time by heat mapping your productivity Idea Garden The Blog Post Planner and Calendar TextMate Lightroom WordPress Markdown Jetpack for WordPress Google Docs WordPress Stats Google Analytics Edgar Rainmaker
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089: Build From What You Have with Sonia Simone
Think about what comes to mind when I ask you to think about a marketer or sales person. Be honest! Did you think of a smart, soft spoken, insightful woman? If not, I hope today’s episode changes that for you. Sonia Simone is a marketing trend setter and founding partner of Rainmaker Digital, formerly Copyblogger Media. Throughout our conversation, she reveals how a risk averse, introverted and insanely curious writer became one of the leading voices in digital marketing today. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:03] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #89. [2:17] Charlie introduces Sonia and her line of work. [4:22] What is it about marketing that got Sonia involved? [6:34] There is an invisible aspect of digital marketing. Sonia explains. [8:01] Sonia has always approached marketing from the content marketing perspective, even before there was a word for it. [10:25] Marketing and selling are learnable skill sets; you don’t need to be born with them. [12:29] Every human being on this planet has a certain set of assets and a certain set of constraints. [15:28] Barriers are a lot easier to step over in digital platforms. [18:39] Sonia walks us through her journey from corporate to Copyblogger. [25:22] Sonia speaks on folks out there that sell business advice based on the fast outliers. [28:58] Sonia likes Chris Gilbo’s flavor of entrepreneur teaching because it includes a big minimalist component.  [32:06] Sonia talks on Clay Collins’ vision of being a business owner. [34:10] “What’s the shortest line between me and a cheque?” - Naomi Dunford [36:40] Internet Marketing for Smart People vs. Nice People!! [39:49] Sonia has been highly focused on values lately. [44:10] Naomi writes 85% of the things she says in her podcast Confessions of a Pink-Haired Marketer, which she has been her primary focus lately. [48:34] What’s the most unanticipated challenge Sonia is currently facing? [52:05] Sonia’s final words of advice: “Be honest about your own set of Legos and don’t try to build somebody else’s thing.”   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant www.copyblogger.com Rainmaker Digital Remarkable Communication Clay Collins Naomi Dunford Internet Marketing for Smart People Confessions of a Pink-Haired Marketer Podcast
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088: What Happens When You Go Against Your Daily Rhythms?
This is a jam between Angel and I on what happens when you go against your daily rhythms and having awareness and synchronicity with your natural biorhythms. We also chat about creative energy, adapting to schedule shifts, peak creative times, “screen sucking”, schedule optimization, and more. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:32] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #88. [1:40] What’s been going on since Angela and Charlie’s last podcast? [3:33] What are biorhythms? [5:03] Spring is in the air and there is a lot of shift in people’s creative energy. [6:11] Charlie has shifted his native biorhythm to meeting in the mornings and creating in the afternoons. How is this new schedule change working for him? [7:40] What are Angela’s peak creative times? [8:32] This industrial biorhythms a lot of us are on is actually not natural in some ways. [11:11] If Charlie already knew what his creative peak times were, why did he change it? [14:15] The difference between theory and practice is that in theory there’s no difference between theory and practice! [19:46] Angela weighs in on how technology and modernity has changed our natural biorhythms. How does this relate to habit changes? [21:56] Charlie goes on a social media rant as it relates to “screen sucking”. [25:24] Charlie knows when he’s “screen sucking” but he stops and asks if what he is doing is nourishing. [27:34] Charlie’s new schedule has resulted in him getting a lot more done in the last couple of weeks but it’s not sustainable. [30:38] When did Charlie know his schedule change was not going to be sustainable in the long term. [36:20] The point Charlie wants to drive home is to pay attention to what parts of your schedule are working for you and what aren’t. [36:34] Angela and Charlie discuss the challenges women face with regards to their biorhythms and how they internalize set expectations. [40:11] What’s your natural biorhythm? Lean in to that! [40:44] How can you plan and negotiate your day so that you’re really tapping into the energy when it’s best for you, and not doing things at the wrong time. [40:59] What are the signals that you use to gauge whether you’re energetically on point? [41:27] What permission will you give yourself to explore creating a schedule that’s more nourishing for you? [42:07] Angela’s gentle reminder: practice compassion with yourself while you’re going through these changes.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox.com/Giant Heat Mapping Your Productivity Charlie Gilkey The Night Owl Manifesto by Mike Vardy
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087: Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway with Michelle Bushneff
As uncomfortable as it is to make big changes in life no matter what those changes are, fear kicks into overdrive when you’re changing great careers and great jobs. Michelle Bushneff joins me today to share her purpose-filled pioneering journey from software companies to Athleta to her own consultancy and now back to more full-time positions. We explore the difference between passion and purpose, second acts and the changing realities of being a woman in today’s business world. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:03] Charlie tells us a little bit about Michelle Bushneff. [3:52] Which two common threads have bound all of Michelle’s different projects? [6:13] Michelle has played an important role in using emerging media & technologies to give women a voice, but also to serve women better. [7:00] Being a part of helping to shift dynamics in the business world in terms of women & leadership roles. [8:03] What are some of the biggest shifts Michelle has seen in terms of new and emerging opportunities for women? [11:56] Social media as a personal publishing platform has had such a huge impact for women. [13:31] The distinction between passion and purpose. [17:14] What is Michelle passionate about and what is the purpose behind it for her? [18:37] How did she know it was fear that was holding her back in her career? How does the fear come into play for her? [21:38] Michelle is not a fan of her awful commute but it’s OK because where she’s going serves her purpose. [24:55] What elements in Michelle’s work have been out of her passion or purpose box? [27:48] Michelle talks on her journey of taking a leap from Athleta to consulting to now working full-time. [32:55] There are always tradeoffs in life!  [33:52] Figuring out how there was a better way to go about fulfilling her purpose. [36:52] Michelle shares advice on staying real. [40:49] Michelle shares how all the inspiration out there has infused her with inspiration. [43:08] Having humility and a lifelong learner mindset and embracing it. [45:46] The more diversity you can bring into an environment the more potential there is for something exceptional to happen. [46:31] What is the most unanticipated challenge Michelle is currently facing? [48:29] Michelle wants people to stay purpose-focused and not be afraid to take some leaps.     Mentioned in This Episode: Athleta Michelle Bushneff on LinkedIn @BIGthinkster on Twitter www.bigthinkster.com
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086: Two Concepts of Freedom
A lot of our decisions revolve around enhancing our own freedom. The challenge is that there are two distinct kinds of freedom that are often in tension and lead us to making decisions that keep us from flourishing and being our best selves in the world. In today’s solo riff, I’m going to explore the two concepts of freedom and how they lead to different outcomes.   Key Takeaways: [0:49] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #86. [1:50] Have you ever made a choice to increase your freedom only to figure out you were no happier afterwards? [1:56] Or have you ever found you’ve been the most happy during times in which you were the least free? [2:02] If so, you’ve experienced the reality of there being two kinds of freedom: Negative freedom and positive freedom. [2:54] The two concepts of freedom often hang in tension with one another experientially. [3:14] The distinction between the two concepts of freedom becomes even more tense for those of us who are service-focused & enjoy working in groups. But how? [4:58] Entrepreneurship and having a small business gives you the option to choose which interferences and inconveniences you want to face. [6:45] The distinction between positive and negative freedom is not new. In 1958, Isaiah Berlinshared a philosophical lecture called Two concepts of Liberty. [9:22] What constraints will give you the most positive freedom? What do positive freedom and negative freedom each gives us? [9:56] Freedom shares the same relationships with constraints as creativity does with structure. [11:10] Picking a business strategy or model and sticking with it enables more positive freedom for your business. [11:32] A better question than “How can I be free?” is “What conditions enable me to thrive and what do I need to do to get them in place?”   Mentioned in This Episode: www.sanebox.com/Giant Two Concepts of Liberty by Isaiah Berlin
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085: The Masks We Wear Influence the Lives We Live with Dr. Atira Charles
Each of us wears a different mask every day, whether that mask is being a mother, a creative person, a brother or a manger. Knowing when we’re wearing the right one and which ones not to reveal, is key to our success and happiness. Dr. Atira Charles joins me today to jam about how the mask we wear relates to authenticity, vulnerability, productivity and stress. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:54] Charlie tells us a little bit about Dr. Atira Charles. [2:19] Dr. Charles speaks on wearing many different masks in life and how that relates to our sense of identity. [4:23] There are different ways to wear a mask and we can be or not be aware of whether we’re wearing one or which one we’re wearing. [5:01] Dr. Charles gives an example to explain what she means by “a mask” and how that can set different expectations. [6:41] People are so reactive that we’re not pro-active. [7:46] We’re either self-defined or auto-defined. Dr. Charles explains the difference. [9:54] Identity can be a source of affirmation and pride or it can be a source of threat. But different identities can exist at the same time. [14:14] How can we analyze the mask we are wearing and determine if it’s the right one for us at a given time? [19:06] There is a fine balance between transparency and vulnerability. [23:48] What are the most valuable and emotionally charged masks we can wear? [28:47] Masks are not something to hide and conceal. It’s about when to wear which ones. [29:52] What are the emotional and psychological consequences of having a creative thirst that’s never quenched? [33:31] Charlie and Dr. Charles discuss instant gratification and how it relates to self-identity. [37:26] In any situation certain identities we have, no matter what space we’re in, are who we are. What are your unwavering self-identities? [39:20] How can a manufactured urgency for insatiability come from external pressures? [41:05] Have peace about where your stage is because all comparisons are not equal. [44:40] What’s the most unanticipated challenge Dr. Charles is currently facing? [46:41] The one thing Dr. Charles wants everyone to take away from this episode.   Mentioned in This Episode: @DrAtiraCharles on Twitter www.ourmasks.com
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084: Changing Directions Isn’t Failing with Laura Neff
Something we don’t talk about enough is that many entrepreneurs and small business owners realize being in that space isn’t necessarily right for them. Sometimes it’s about business models and market trends, and yet other times it has nothing to do with those external conditions. But given that being an entrepreneur or small business owner is a core way of understanding their place in the world, it can be hard to take the next right step for them without feeling shame, grief, frustration or anger. Laura Neff joins me today to share what she has learned as someone who stepped away from one small business she started and grew; and is potentially stepping away from her current one into something bigger and better. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:09] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode #84. [2:13] Charlie tells us a little bit about Laura Neff. [4:46] How did Laura get to the point of realizing she may not be going down the road that’s going to flourish her the best? [7:58] Charlie loves teams and achieving goals in a team format. [9:45] One of the #1 core values Laura has noticed people have in common is freedom. [11:46] Charlie’s #1 rule for insight: whenever you come up with an ‘either/or’, realize that it’s a false dichotomy. [13:57] What has Laura realized is so appealing about going back to a corporate structure? [17:29] Why is it not so simple to know what you want to do? Laura explains. [22:44] Laura believes in the next couple of years we’re going to see a bit of an ‘exitist’ from the solopreneur/entrepreneur online business space. Charlie agrees! [26:21] Laura embraces the organic unfolding of what’s to come and not knowing what is next. [31:51] Laura describes a mental image of the organic unfolding she speaks of. [34:03] What is the one main message Laura wants listeners to take away? [34:36] Laura’s challenge for listeners is to get real.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox www.lifeleadershipcentral.com Two Concepts of Freedom by Charlie Gilkey
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083: How to Be Grounded and Positive Through Life’s Challenges with Marc and Angel Chernoff
Every one of us has our own unique set of challenges and negative beliefs that keep us from living life to the fullest. To thrive, we have to develop rituals, practices and methods that help us root out the negative thoughts and beliefs that are hurting our productivity, goals, health and relationships. Marc and Angel join me today to share the practices, tools and insights that helped them in their journey from newlyweds and trying circumstances to being recognized by Forbes as the creators of one of the most popular personal development blogs in the world. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:02] Charlie tells us a little bit about Marc and Angel Chernoff. [3:24] Marc tells us about the early days in his and Angel’s journey. [6:01] How did their blog, marcandangel.com, evolve? [9:15] Marc talks on the shift in expectations in relation to the ‘hockey stick’ effect. [10:48] What were some of the mindsets and limiting beliefs Marc and Angel struggled with? [14:33] When you’re faced with two opportunities, always go with the one that scares you the most because that’s the one that you’re going to be able to grow with the most. [18:27] A huge part about being grounded is simply, gratitude. [19:14] Implementing very small rituals can help you make positive changes. [20:31] You have to have a contingency plan. Always ask what’s the worst and best thing that can happen and be prepared for it. [24:22] Back in 2006, Angel and Marc were faced with lots of tragedies. Angels talks on how they overcame some of those challenges. [27:45] Marc speaks on some of the relationship challenges they faced. [29:18] How do Angel and Marc keep things healthy and warm given the nature of their professional relationship? [31:39] Journaling and self-enquiry are two major tools that Marc uses to work through his perfectionistic tendencies. [35:14] Distractions and working on multiple things at once is something Angel has to work through. [37:03] What’s the most powerful story they have told themselves and how was it created? [41:30] Parenting has turned out to be the most unanticipated challenge for Angel and Marc. [45:29] Don’t doubt yourself. You’re the most important person in your life.   Mentioned in This Episode: www.marcandangel.com 1,000+ Little Things Happy Successful People Do Differently by Marc and Angel Chernoff  
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082: Exercise Is a Foundation for Success with Mike Goncalves
All too often, exercise and movement are put in a different bucket of activities than those that count towards being productive. Unfortunately, that’s backwards. Exercise is a foundation for success, so focusing on our health and fitness is one of the most productive things we can do. Mike Goncalves joins me today to talk about the relationship between creativity, confidence, priorities, and exercise. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:56] Thank you to SaneBox.com for sponsoring episode 82 of The Creative Giant Show. [2:00] Charlie tells us a little bit about Mike Goncalves. [3:23] Mike believes exercising helps us to become more creative.   [5:25] When you’re at your best, everything else benefits, but we tend to prioritize ourselves last, rather than first. [7:22] If you want to excel at any part of your life, you have to take up exercise, fitness, and healthy eating.   [9:30] How do we get past that feeling of not wanting to get up and start exercising? [11:29] What can you do when you have ‘zero’ time for exercise? [12:41] Email Mike to respond to his challenge. He answers all his emails personally. [13:37] What 5 exercises can you do in 5 minutes? Try doing each one for a minute and shoot Mike an email to let him know how it felt. [15:19] How does focusing on your own health and happiness inspire others? [18:52] Motion Effects Emotion! Studies show over and over again that even a simple 15-20 min walk changes your confidence level and energy.   [20:54] What are some of Mike’s areas for self-improvement and growth? [22:16] How does Mike work through all the "I have to’s"? [23:28] What’s Mike’s biggest challenge right now and how is exercise helping him move through it? [25:38] Mike identifies himself as the ‘fitness guy’ and that helps him do what needs to get done. [27:45] Exercise is the foundation for success. [30:26] A study found that one of the top reasons health resolutions don’t last is because we come out of the gate too fast, swinging too aggressively, so it’s not sustainable. [31:37] Try doing these 5 exercises: jumping jacks, burpees, pushups, abdominal/bicycle, abdominal/plank. [34:05] You have to focus on where you are and not where you think you should be. [36:22] The one message Mike wants to leave us with.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox Mike’s Email: mike@thewellnessbucket.com Mike Goncalves (@WellnessBucket) on Twitter www.thewellnessbucket.com Uncertainty by Jonathan Fields
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081: Changing the World, One Toilet at a Time with Jasmine Burton
Jasmine Burton, an inspirational 24-year-old running a startup in Africa, hopes to improve women’s health via redesign of water, sanitation and hygiene infrastructure - sparking the foundation of Wish for Wash. In this episode, you’ll learn how a variety of waste management gaps exist despite how far the western world has advanced the human experience. This creates an odd disparity between knowing that billions of people defecate in buckets and bags, yet are using smartphones to WhatsApp message each other.  Jasmine speaks on the challenges of making the cost per unit to be under $20, and how to make it affordable to the low-income communities that need the product most.   Key Takeaways: [00:10] According to the UN, 6 billion people have access to mobile phones. Yet, only 4.5 billion have access to working toilets. [01:15] Jasmine’s senior design team won the InVenture competition for their design of an inexpensive mobile toilet. [02:55] Jasmine explains her journey from Georgia to Zambia, and how her company is inspired by how access to toilets hinders women’s advancement worldwide. [04:30] Her team was the first all-female team to win the Georgia Tech InVenture competition. [05:00] At the end of 2014, she founded Wish for Wash and moved to Zambia to join a global health initiative, and now self-identifies as a “toilet designer”. [07:45] The need for healthy food is much easier to communicate than the need for good sanitation, making it difficult to convince people to change their behavior. [11:21] There’s nothing “wrong” with the way western civilization deals with sanitation and waste. However, there are opportunities to recycle waste rather than just moving it away from people. [13:15] The “sanitation value chain” explains the aspirational sanitation experience - capture, contain, transport, and repurpose. [14:15] Wish for Wash is looking at the other end of the value chain. Rather than thinking of how to profit from waste, they are focusing on capture and containment. [15:00] Their toilet design is modular, allowing for both sitting and squatting. They are also prototyping a manual bidet for communities who practice washing rather than wiping. [17:25] Access to affordable manufacturing is the current barrier to entry, especially allowing them to make quick and frequent iterations. [24:30] One of the biggest lessons learned in this venture is to practice patience. [26:00] There’s a challenge in selling both a product and a behavioral change at the same time. [27:15] They are exploring military applications, among other contexts for using the toilet. [28:12] Jasmine speaks to her big goal this year for Wish for Wash. [30:00] In the future, they would like to find a less invasive way to collect data, such as a mobile app. [32:39] Supporting the cause can be as simple as having a conversation with Jasmine and her team. [33:20] Charlie shares his final thoughts on the 3 ways he wants you to consider this episode.   Mentioned in This Episode: InVenture Wish for Wash Water and Sanitation for the Urban Poor
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080: Reclaiming Wild Men with Jonathan Mead
Many modern men are caught in a strange space. For one, we can’t and don’t want to be like our fathers and grandfathers, but we also don’t want to be some shade of Homer Simpson. And yet, there’s not much space to talk about this in public either. Add in the fact that many of us, men and women alike, work in confined spaces indoors, and what you get is a ‘caged-in man’, both literally and metaphorically. Jonathan Mead joins me today to jam about reclaiming wild men and how physical movement is tied to our encaging. Note, we discuss the apparent heteronormativity of these views in this conversation, so if that’s bugging you, listen in first. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:08] Thank you to our sponsor, SaneBox. [2:10] Quick shout out to Lee, Nadia and Rob. Thanks for the emails and ratings about the show you all! [2:16] Charlie tells us a little bit about Jonathan Mead. [4:18] How did Jonathan’s journey evolve from Illuminated Mind to Pay to Exist to the Uncaged Man? [7:23] Jonathan is passionate about helping men uncage and reclaim their innate wildness to become the greatest versions of themselves. [9:52] How has Jonathan created a brand that’s exclusively for men? He shares on the journey. [14:28] Where are we as the modern man, right now? [18:50] Men need to be physical and men need to have an outlet for expressing those sharper energies that don’t seem to have a place to fit within society. [20:13] Nature vs. over-domestication of men. Jonathan explains the distinction. [23:03] Everyone is on the spectrum of masculine and feminine energy.  [29:41] Aggressive loving? Jonathan gives examples to explain. [33:23] Back to the wildness! [36:26] We are animals, well, we wear cloths...and all animals play-fight. [39:56] How does Jonathan help men uncage their mind, body, heart, and spirit? The fastest way to uncage and reclaim your wildness as a man is through the body. [42:07] What are some things men can do to make natural movements more accessible in their everyday lives? “Squad and hang” [46:15] If you are resonating with this discussion, check out Jonathan’s free resources on the Uncaged Men website. [49:42] Jonathan’s challenge: Go outside and squad for 1 minute, barefoot.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox Paid to Exist Uncaged Man: Reclaim your wildness The Illuminated Mind by Jonathan Mead
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079: The Hidden Path for Artists with Cory Huff
If you’ve ever considered being a fine artist or have talked to an artist you know, you’ve probably heard or accepted some variate of ‘the gallery myth’, which is that the goal is to have your art featured in a gallery and then you’re set for life. Buyers will flock to you, critics will appreciate you, and you’ll get to continue to make the art you love. I like stories about unicorns too! Cory Huff joins me for episode 79, to discuss the relationship between commerce and art, as well as the hidden path for artists that lead to real abundance. Ready? Let’s do this!      Key Takeaways: [1:01] Who is Cory Huff? [2:18] Cory has been on the show before. Check out Episode 25 on Art, Abundance, and Entrepreneurship with Cory Huff! [3:06] Cory is “the great corruptor”!! What does capitalism have to do with it? [8:18] Charlie sums up the 3 important points Cory made about the art world! [10:24] Cory believes that for some artists Capitalism does inherently corrupt the art making process! [12:38] Charlie believes that capitalism does influence an artist’s work but he’s pushing against the idea that it corrupts it!  [14:01] What is a huge problem in the art world according to Cory? What is a common challenge that all artist or creators are faced with? [18:01] What are the traditional paths to an artist’s career? [22:10] What is the hidden path to long-term longevity in the art world? [23:45] There is a similar type of disruption across every creative field. What about the disruption in the fine art world? [27:40] What does Cory see happening in the near future as a result of digitalization? [30:02] What’s the relationship between the hidden path and social media? How can artists use social media effectively? [33:43] Instagram just announced they’re introducing an algorithmic feed! What does that mean? [38:03] What are Cory’s thoughts on the relationship between artists, the hidden path and experts? [43:55] What’s the ‘not so silver lining’ of not caring what the experts think about your art? [46:07] Cory shares his final thoughts and how you can reach out to him!   Mentioned in This Episode: Theabundantartist.com The Abundant Artist on Facebook How to Sell Your Art Online by Cory Huff The Abundant Artist Conference Episode 25: Art, Abundance, and Entrepreneurship with Cory Huff
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Episode 78: The 3 Essential Pieces of Your Business’s Legal, Tax, and Financial Foundation with Kyle Durand
Let’s face it, the legal, tax and financial aspects of our businesses and creative ventures are areas that many of us avoid. We’ve been conditioned to be afraid of them, in the case of financial and tax matters; and diving into the financial realm, naturally makes people feel uncomfortable. But avoiding them is like trying to build a third floor of your business without building its foundation. Kyle Durand joins me today to jam about 3 essential pieces of your business’s legal, tax, and financial foundation. I ask him some of the common questions I get, so listen in to see if he answers a question you might have. Ready? Let’s do this!    Key Takeaways: [1:06] Who is Kyle Durand? [3:28] What motivated Kyle to do a deep dive into the legal, tax and financial realms? [6:25] Kyle shares a story to help us reframe our relationship with legal, tax and financial matters. [10:59] What are Kyle’s reasons for laying a legal and financial foundation in a businesses. [14:02] How does this type of foundation help you to set the foundation for business growth? [18:23] Kyle discusses the different pillars of the business foundation. [19:16] What is a business entity? How does Kyle use it to his advantage? [21:50] What are 3 different configurations to consider when deciding on a type of business entity? [25:22] Kyle talks about financial systems and the importance of having clarity with money matters. [30:36] When should you get professional help to set up your financial system? What do you want and don’t want in a bookkeeper? [37:06] Kyle talks about business contracts and agreements, which may be the scariest part of all! [43:22] What does Kyle think about the 50/50 partnership agreement? [47:15] When is it a good time to tackle the business partnership agreement? The dos & don’ts of business ventures! [54:56] What is the one thing that Kyle wants the listeners to take action on?   Mentioned in This Episode: www.kyledurand.com QuickBooks   Disclaimer: This does not constitute legal and financial advice. Please consult a professional and engage them for consideration. 
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077: How to Capture the Everyday Wow with Cynthia Morris
Cynthia Morris joins me today to jam about creativity, talent and Capturing the Wow that comes up as we travel through our days. This is a particularly good episode to listen to if you’re at the beginning of your mastering journey with a creative form, whether that form is writing, painting, music, programming or blogging, or any other creative form. Also, if you just found yourself feeling paralyzed by trying to cater to all of the voices out there that might judge your work. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:57] Charlie is delighted to introduce us to Cynthia Morris. [2:51] What is a ‘Medium-agnostic creator’ and how did Cynthia get to owning that title? [7:21] Charlie gives a shout out to Corey Huff, who teaches how to sell your art online! [9:41] How does Cynthia manage the tension between letting her creativity play out in the moment vs. making it better or something ‘for show’? [14:01] What kills creativity and authenticity? [18:35] The element of surprise is a really powerful aspect of life that makes life fun & enjoyable. [20:51] What kind of tension exists between creative surprise and trust? [22:25] What about Cynthia’s art does she think is pretty cool? [24:13] The main takeaway from this conversation: Give yourself some space to play & explore! [24:36] Charlie and Cynthia discuss different levels of consciousness about one’s own competence. [27:41] What sort of tension exists between solo creativity vs. social catalytic creativity? [28:43] How can we be our most authentic selves when we’re making and sharing our work? [31:18] What is the concept of “Capture the Wow” all about? Cynthia explains and outlines 3 of the capture tools she has created.  [38:48] Cynthia shares an example of how she recently used Capture the Wow. [40:38] Cynthia’s creative challenge for this week.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox Books by Cynthia Morris: Create Your Writer's Life Chasing Sylvia Beach Go for It: Leading Tours for Fun and Profit The Graceful Return Capture the Wow Original Impulse Art as a way, Book by Frederick Franck Corey Huff on How to Sell Art Online
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076: Good Strategy Helps You Make Better Choices with Tara Gentile
What does depression, strategy, financial intelligence and specialization, all have in common? They’re all related to choices. In the case of depression, sometimes feeling like you don’t have any. They’re also topics Tara Gentile and I jam about. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:53] Charlie is delighted to have Tara on the show again. She also joined him on episode 27. [2:21] How did Tara go from a career in an academic track, to being an entrepreneur? How did her depression affect her path? [9:03] What are some of the links between creativity and depression? [11:24] How might not expressing yourself lead to the feeling that you’re denying an important piece of yourself? [14:30] How might the hunger you get as an entrepreneur have a positive effect on depression? [18:26] Tara talks on her ongoing struggle with having to say no to things in order to create what she really wants in the future. [23:13] Charlie and Tara discuss how people’s ultimate goals & what they really want right now often don’t match up, which ties into the importance of choosing to not choose. [29:05] How can you stop business burnout from happening by focusing on things that matter? What is The Content Delusion?  [32:48] What questions does Tara ask when she comes across new tactics, methods or strategies? How does experience tie into this? [36:41] What are some frameworks that allow people to say yes or no very easily?  [42:18] Tara wants to know how Charlie handles the shame that comes up when analyzing what hasn’t worked in the past with his clients. [48:00] A lot of the insecurity and fear that comes up with creative entrepreneurs stems from not looking at the books, plans, and strategies. [49:33] Tara talks about the DailyWorth, which offers financial and career advice for women. [52:27] Tara and Charlie discuss predictability and ‘game changers’.    Mentioned in This Episode: Tara Gentile Episode 27: Leveraging Your Quiet Power with Tara Gentile The Content Delusionby Jonathan Fields DailyWorth - Financial and Career Advice for Women
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075: Bringing Conversations about Death to Life with Kathy Kortes-Miller
We all know that death is a part of life, but it’s the part of life that we, as a society and individuals, often would rather not talk about. And yet, not talking about it isn’t making it go away; and in fact, makes death and dying so much harder for us to process. Kathy Kortes-Miller joins me today to talk about how to bring life into conversations about death. If you’re not a long time listener to the show, you might wonder why we’re talking about death. One of the reasons I do this show is to share a wider range of the human and creative experience than just the Oprah version. I most want you and us all to see that we’re not alone in whatever adversity we’re going through, and you can triumph too. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:13] Thank you to our sponsor, SaneBox.com. [2:13] Charlie is pumped to introduce Kathy Kortes-Miller. [3:52] How did Kathy slide into a career in death education? [5:32] How did she feel about death at the early stages of this path? [7:40] How did we get to this point where death is such a taboo topic to talk about? [12:35] Charlie shares a story on death in earlier forms of our societies and existence. [14:06] Why would we want death to become a normative life event? [17:32] How do we open the door to having conversations about death across generations? [20:41] What sort of things have people, who are at the end of their lives, told Kathy they wished they had done differently. [22:28] What are some conversation initiators on how to have a more intentional or celebratory passing? [27:49] How do we make conversations about death something that’s what we want to do vs. what we have to do? [31:54] People don’t necessarily know what to do after your passing. They don’t know what rituals you want or what legacy you want to leave behind. [34:20] Kathy shares a story about a family she worked with whose dad was dying. [35:57] What’s happening now with the traditional funeral model? [37:46] Kathy’s ‘one song’ about death and the process of dying.   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox
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074: The Emotional Journey of Growing Your Business
Angela is joining me today to jam about the emotional journey that happens as you’re growing and scaling your business. There are a lot of ups and downs, but a lot of times we’re not talking about the leaders or founders’ journey of grief, excitement, freedom, and fear that happens as they start letting go of more and more pieces of the business and start working on the business rather than in the business. This came up because a team mate was letting us know she was talking to a friend who is a small business owner that’s going through it. So, we thought it’s a great topic to talk about. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:07] The framework for today’s discussion is based on Michael Gerber’s distinction between working on the business vs. working in the business. [3:54] The Small Business Lifecycle and the first stage of business growth. [4:51] The second stage of growing your team and delegation. [6:03] The last and hardest stage of business growth, which occurs in mature businesses. [9:23] How do you let go of something you’re so good at doing in your own business? Slowly! [17:25] What do you do with your newly gained creative energy? [22:01] The tense balance that is created when you’re at the last stage of letting go of responsibilities. [26:46] There are different things you can do with that excess creative energy. [30:20] The challenges with slowing down and letting the rest of your team take care of things! [34:39] An opportune time to take a step back as a founder or CEO and get really clear about the vision for your business. [38:04] The two types of fear that come up for people in getting to that level of finally letting go. [40:02] Growing your business involves an emotional and spiritual journey that can be embraced.   Mentioned in This Episode: The E-Myth, book by Michael Gerber The Small Business Lifecycle, book by Charlie Gilkey
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073: How to Sew Business Success in the Fashion Industry with Shannon Whitehead
Though we wear cloths every day – at least most of us do – many of us don’t think about the entrepreneurial and economic aspects related to the cloths we wear. Like many other business industries, the fashion industry is going through a massive disruption, making it a great time to be an entrepreneur and creative person within the fashion industry. That said, it’s also really tough. Shannon Whitehead joins me today to discuss how to sew business success in the fashion industry. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:58] Thank you to our sponsor, SaneBox.com. [1:58] Who is Shannon Whitehead? [3:26] Why did Shannon decide to start her own sustainable apparel business? [4:46] Why the apparel industry? [6:27] What is it about the fashion industry that makes it tough? [8:03] What are some of the different trends that make it tough to get started in the fashion industry? [10:02] What are the trends that are leading to the fashion industry’s disruption? [11:58] What are some challenges that may come up for someone who is starting a clothing line? [15:39] Why did Shannon choose to play up not having VC money when she launched Factory45? [17:36] Why did she decide to close up shop with Revolution Apparel despite all the buzz? [19:19] Shannon talks us through the story of closing down Revolution Apparel. [23:00] What was harder, and easier, than she thought it would be with Factory 45? [25:30] How did she talk about Factory45 in 2014 vs. now? [26:45] Why is it such a big deal to manufacture clothing with environmentally-friendly methods? [29:54] What were some of the spark moments since starting Factory45? [31:00] What’s the greatest unanticipated challenge Shannon is currently facing? [34:29] Shannon’s main message to us!   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox Project 333 by Courtney Carver Factory45 Revolution Apparel Seemly Apparel
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Episode 72: Embracing Change with Jenny Blake
Many of us get stuck in life, because for some reason or the other we’re resistant to change. Being resistant to change is like being resistant to gravity, we might be able to counter some the effects of it, but it’s always going to be there. There are some amazing gifts that come from embracing change, and Jenny Blake joins me to jam about the ways to embrace change rather than to resist it. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:51] Thank you to our sponsor, SaneBox.com [1:51] Charlie tells us a bit about Jenny and her body of work. [3:54] What excites Jenny the most about living in New York? [5:16] How did Jenny get started with ‘Life After College’ before leading Google? [6:41] How did she handle her crisis of confidence when she decided to leave Google? [7:54] How did Jenny find her spark after struggling with her confidence & the path she was on? [12:45] Jenny’s ‘aha’ moment with PIVOT & digging herself out of the ‘dark existential hole’. [15:03] How do you get in that creative spark zone without crisis or hitting rock bottom? [18:19] Meditation practice is a big business accelerator for Jenny! [21:29] What was most surprising when writing her book, PIVOT? [24:54] We never know what the future holds, but we do have certain ‘constants’! [29:53] The new security for Jenny: having a diversified portfolio of our day & our income. [31:46] What do you do when you’re in an ‘okay’ or a ‘great’ job by others’ standards, but that it’s not the ‘IT’ job for you? [34:53] What kind of life do you want to live? Are you aligning your day-to-day with your values? [39:21] What are the pieces of your priorities’ pie & how are you going to portion & slice it up? [42:14] Jenny suggests finding ‘constants’ in your life to help you make better decisions. [46:37] Within a decision itself you can have known and unknown variables. Turn the scary unknowns into ‘how can I’ questions? [49:21] What is the most unanticipated challenge Jenny is facing right now & what is a known ‘unknown’ for her? [55:41] What does Jenny want people to remember about her or her body of work?   Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox JennyBlake.me @jenny_blake Life After College PIVOT by Jenny Blake Sacret Contracts by Caroline Myss Antifragile by Nassim Nicholas Taleb Scarcity by Sendhil Mullainathan and Eldar Shafir
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071: Managing Your Money is a Creative Process with Luna Jaffe
Most people don’t put managing their money and being creative together. Especially since one seems to be what you have to do, whereas the other seems to be what you get to do. But managing your money is a creative process and whether you like it or not, it’s an emotional process too. Luna Jaffe joins me today to share how she has incorporated her work as an artist into her work as a guide for people to improve their relationship with their money. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:53] Struggling to keep up with processing your email? SaneBox may just be the tool you need! [1:30] Go to SaneBbox.com/giant & you’ll get a $25 credit towards subscription on top of the 14 days free trial. [1:55] Charlie tells us a bit about Luna Jaffe and her work! [3:51] What was it like to jump from being a psychotherapist to being a financial planner? [7:53] What were some clear visions Luna had that seemed super crazy? What happened when she pursued them? [9:56] How does Luna maintain momentum & at the same time does quantum shifts? [14:19] What’s been 3 lessons Luna has had to learn all over again? [18:02] Luna’s thoughts on going from being solo-oriented to community-oriented. [22:40] Luna’s suggestions on how to visualize & think about your relationship with money. [26:14] What are some surprising or unexpected things she has seen with people & their money? [30:07] Any good coach is asking good questions & encouraging people to understand things at a deeper level. [33:24] What’s been harder to do with Sacred Money Studios that didn’t turn out to be that hard? [38:28] What’s it like to go through the highs & lows of running her businesses? [44:55] What’s the most unanticipated challenge Luna is facing right now? [48:35] What’s the one thing Luna wants the listeners to take away from this episode?   Mentioned in This Episode: Luna Jaffe – Where Creativity & Money Meet Lunaria Financial KMS Financial Services Inc. Wild Money: A Creative Journey to Financial Wisdom by Luna Jaffe Wild Money Coloring Book by Luna Jaffe Sacred Money Studios
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070: Love is the Source of Personal Growth with Dr. Laura Ciel and Bill Poett
Part of being a Creative Giant is learning to be fully you, however you might show up. That’s a hard enough journey but it can feel even more daunting to learn to do that while in a romantic relationship with another Creative Giant. Dr. Laura Ciel and Bill Poett join me to talk about their work together and how they navigate a romantic partnership that’s also a business partnership. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:52] Struggling to keep up with processing your email? SaneBox may just be the tool you need! [1:30] Go to SaneBbox.com/giant & you’ll get a $25 credit towards subscription on top of the 14 days free trial. [1:54] Charlie introduces Dr. Laura Ciel and Bill Poett. [3:45] Dr. Laura Ciel shares her origin story. [4:50] Bill Poett shares his origin story. [6:05] How did their conversation about doing business together begin? [9:04] Bill unpacks how they went from their first conversation to co-leading, 5 weeks later. [10:58] Bill talks about his emotional journey with Laura’s competency. [15:51] What’s been the biggest type of conflict or disagreement between them & how have they worked it out? [21:36] What’s a pattern about the other person that you wish were different? [27:13] What’s the secret sauce of the Life Advance International program? [32:10] A discussion on the journey to love and the power of love. [36:46] What does Bill do to support Laura when she is not in her ‘zone’? [41:20] What does Laura do to support Bill when he’s not at his ‘standing tall’ place? [45:59] Charlie talks about the Nonviolent Communication (page 44). [47:12] Laura & Bill are committed the outcome but how they get there is left open. [52:25] What do Laura & Bill have to say to someone who may be giving up on love? [57:53] What do they want people to remember about them & their body of work?     Mentioned in This Episode: SaneBox Sanebox.com/Giant Life Advance International The Warrior-Heart Project Live and Love Fearlessly, Book by Bill Poett Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, Book by Marshall Rosenberg
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069: How to Build Your Mentor Group with Jeff Hopeck
Mentors often make the difference between us successfully finishing the stuff that matters and just thinking or dreaming about it. This is especially the case for young adults and new entrepreneurs, who often times get so much well meaning, but bad advice from other people who’ve never gone where the ‘would be mentee’ is trying to go. Jeff Hopeck joins me to jam about the value of mentors and some ways to go about building your own mentor group. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [2:00] Charlie tells us about Jeff Hopeck’s background. [3:25] Jeff talks about his work and how he ended up being an entrepreneur. [8:00] Jeff discusses how he ended up on the Howard Stern Radio. [9:30] Jeff lets us know how Killer Shark was born. [11:15] Why do so many entrepreneurs fail out of the gate? [14:15] Focus on the growth and the pathway to there, not necessarily the destination. [14:45] Why is it important to have mentors at a young age? [17:20] Charlie asks Jeff how he went from a Marketing Degree to the US Secret Service. [19:30] Jeff shares with us the pathway he took to get him to the place where he is today. [21:45] Jeff tells us about Jack Canfield’s book, The Success Principals. [23:50] Charlie and Jeff discuss Jordan Agolli from Episode 56. [27:55] Align yourself with people who don’t question whether you will be successful, but help you to figure out how you’ll be successful. [28:20] How would young people go about finding a mentor? [28:38] Jeff outlines how he chooses the different mentors in his life. [33:30] What is the #1 huge piece in choosing a mentor. [37:53] Jeff shares two “Anchor Posts” on his website: 13 Questions I think Entrepreneurs Should Constantly Ask 9 Most Common Mistakes Entrepreneurs Make (and Usually Repeat) [40:00] Jeff discusses the importance of aligning with your ethical and spiritual core values. [42:45] Young people need to have a vision. Start formulating now. [48:00] What do people get wrong when choosing a mentor? [51:58] Where is the best place to discuss questions with your prospective mentor? [55:30] Jeff unpacks his most unanticipated challenge with Killer Shark. [57:30] Get a solid road map of the areas of your life and start developing mentors in every area.   Mentioned in This Episode: http://www.sanebox.com/ The Success Principles – Book by Jack Canfield jeffhopeck.com Jordan Agolli Episode 56
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068: What's Lurking in the Basement of Your Personality? With Todd Kashdan
While we like the idea that we can simply think ourselves into certain beliefs and instincts, the truth of the matter is that our personality is partially determined by our evolutionary history. There might be some things lurking down there that we don’t want to address, but we can’t ignore them either. Professor Tod Kashdan joins me today to jam about, what he calls, the ‘basement of your personality’ and why it matters. If you’re looking for change, maybe it’s time to look in the basement of your personality. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [2:04] Charlie tells us about Dr. Todd Kashdan’s body of work. [3:52] Todd talks about his work and the field of positive psychology. [5:14] Many people don’t think about how our evolutionary history affects the development of our personality. [6:42] Why do we avoid the evolutionary psychology background underlying character development? [8:17] Charlie talks about Vanessa Van Edwards’ work on subconscious behavioral cues. [9:23] The link between in-group/out-group preferences and our biological responses. [14:02] Todd shares research findings on xenophobia & pregnant women in the 3rd trimester. [15:10] The first benefit of evolutionary psychology is understanding who we are. [16:26] What can we do about the constraints on the body & what the brain can process? [21:26] Cultural differences in cheerfulness, optimism, and positivity – Japan vs. US. [23:57] Would you prefer to be more cheerful most of the time or to be more resilient…? [26:42] How do we deal with the friction of everyday life? [29:25] Creativity is about seeing things from a different perspective than others. [31:58] Todd shares findings from a study that looked at the personality dimensions of about 15,000 entrepreneurs. [34:28] Charlie & Todd discuss the profile of a creative person. [35:53] What are the personality traits of creative people? [39:58] Todd reiterates on the importance of culture. [41:44] Todd shares his insights on what you can do to build up your stress tolerance. [48:33] Todd’s 3 tips, summarized: Choose curiosity over criticality. Persuade people by asking why something is important to them and listen. Be precise in describing your emotional state when you are stressed and upset.   Mentioned in This Episode: http://www.sanebox.com/ Vanessa Van Edwards – Science of People/ The Upside of Your Dark Side: Why Being Your Whole Self--Not Just Your "Good" Self--Drives Success and Fulfillment – Book by Robert Biswas-Diener and Todd Kashdan Curious? Discover the Missing Ingredient to a Fulfilling Life – Book by Todd Kashdan To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others – Book by Daniel Pink Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life: Life-Changing Tools for Healthy Relationships. Book by Marshall B. Rosenberg
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067: How to Avoid Creative Burnout with Jennifer Louden
Finishing creative work is challenging because sometimes you can’t just push through, as doing so will lead to creative burnout. And yet, you can’t give up when it gets hard or you’ll never really do the work that matters. Jennifer Louden joins me on this episode to share how her wearing away from creative burnout lead to a new body of work and what she has learned along the way about avoiding creative burnout. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:58] Who is Jennifer Louden? [3:19] Jennifer shares her origin story. [6:37] How did Jennifer transition from being a screen writer to writing a book on self-care? [13:38] What new elements did the shift allow her to introduce into her body of work? [15:01] Gender-differences in creativity – Are there any? [16:56] How does Jennifer’s competitive nature trip her up? [18:05] How does her competitive nature help her out? [22:24] What is Jennifer excited about? –Aside from her memoir. [24:35] What are some dynamics of women & creativity that are under-addressed? [27:36] How has Jennifer helped women say ‘yes’ to themselves? [30:03] Willian Stafford’s ‘The Thread’ vs. this big/scary life-purpose thing. [32:27] Jennifer and Charlie share a few stories. [36:44] Where do we get this idea that if it’s hard we should be doing something else? [38:14] Jennifer shares advice on the Keystone Habits. [40:00] Why does she resist habit, rituals, and structure? But they’re also so important! [44:56] The one thing Jennifer wants us to remember about her and her body of work.   Mentioned in This Episode: Books by Jennifer Louden The Woman’s Comfort book The Couple’s Comfort Book The Pregnant Woman’s Comfort Book The Woman’s Retreat Book Comfort Secrets for Busy Women The Life Organizer Year of Daily Joy The Way It Is by William Stafford Keystone Habits https://www.sanebox.com/Giant  
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066: Scaling Up Without Selling Out with Laura Novak Meyer
A common myth is that scaling a business means you have to compromise the core values, culture and human-friendly qualities that the business originally started with. In today’s episode, Laura Novak Meyer joins me to share what she learned in the process of scaling her business while keeping it true to its core. Laura is an entrepreneur who is one of only 3% of women business owners to grow their company to more than one million dollars in revenue. Ready? Let’s do this!   Key Takeaways: [0:53] Laura Novak Myers – The owner & founder of Little Nest Portraits [1:46] Laura shares her origin story. [2:30] How did Laura go from an independent photographer to a retail photography company? [5:35] Opening her first little Nest location. [6:38] What made Laura hire her first employee? [9:12] Did Laura have any entrepreneurial background before starting her own business? [10:25] Why do people cling to that divide between creative and business? [13:21] Laura’s 3 seminal challenges and lessons learned from them. [17:46] How did she overcome her concern for hurting people’s feelings while giving feedback. [20:32] Something Laura is very passionate about. [22:37] Laura doesn’t believe you can grow without constantly reinforcing your values. [25:35] Why didn’t Laura tell her employees about franchising at first? [28:52] Some of Laura’s spark moments throughout her career. [31:07] Laura’s best practices for maintaining a sense of calmness. [33:34] The unspoken pressures every entrepreneur is faced with. [36:52] Franchising was harder than Laura expected it to be. [41:36] The most unanticipated challenge Laura is facing. [44:14] If people remember only one thing about Laura and her body of work, what would it be?   Mentioned in This Episode: Little Nest Portraits Radical Candor by Campbell Scott Fierce Conversations by Susan Scott The One Minute Manager by Ken Blanchard Build to Sell by John Warrillow
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065: The Coaching Habit Unlocks Human Potential with Michael Bungay Stanier
Coaching is a powerful way of being with people, because it unlocks human potential and transforms the way you relate to others. It is also really misunderstood, misrepresented, and when done right it is hard to do. Michael Bungay Stanier is an award winning coach and he joins me today to work through some powerful coaching questions you can use at work and at home. Make sure to listen in, for the turn in the conversation about two thirds of the way through this episode. Ready? Let's do this!   Key Takeaways: [1:00] Who is Michael Bungay Stanier? [3:25] Michael’s books, Do More Great Work & The Coaching Habit [4:31] Michael talks about the ‘resistance’ to coaching and related statistics [6:00] Coaching is about leading with more curiosity and with a lot less advice [6:59] The T.E.R.A quotient explains why it’s hard for people to listen and not be an 'advice monster' [9:33] Coaching is an effective leadership style and it has to be done in 10 minutes or less [12:59] Michael talks on the process and provides a working definition of coaching [14:47] Managers can delegate and still hold their value in an organization [16:41] The drama triangle: Victim, Persecutor, and Rescuer [21:14] The 7 most powerful coaching questions for managers, from The Coaching Habit (p. 200) [23:04] The two questions Michael puts more weight on when coaching managers. [26:28] Why does asking 'why' get a little problematic? [27:27] Which of the questions seem easy but in fact are harder to have a powerful conversation around? [29:39] The trickiest question for Michael is the foundation question: What do you want? [32:12] Michael talks on the difference between wants and needs [34:06] Which of the 7 questions is the most challenging for Michael? [41:04] How to transform your own potential? Michael has a mastermind group [43:19] Michael talks about the process of writing and shaping his new book [46:30] Michael’s one takeaway message: "Say no to more stuff so you can say yes to the right stuff".   Mentioned in This Episode: Box of Crayons Do More Great Work by Micheal Bungay Stanier End Malaria by Micheal Bungay Stanier Malaria no More The Coaching Habit by Micheal Bungay Stanier Goleman, Daniel. "Leadership that gets results." (2000). TouchPoints: Creating Powerful Leadership Connections in the Smallest of Moments by Douglas Conant and Mette Norgaard John Whitmore The 7 most powerful coaching questions… from The Coaching Habit (p. 200) Immunity to Change by Robert Kegan and Lisa Lahey Michael Bungay Stanier’s Mastermind Group
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064: What Will You Stand For This Year? with Jeffrey Davis
You were probably in the goal setting mode for 2016 or maybe you just want to set the right goals. It turns out that making great goals is often a matter of asking the right questions. Jeffrey Davis and I think a particularly good question is, "what will you stand for, this year?" and that's what we're jamming about on this episode. This isn't about fighting against something but rather standing up and standing for something. You are writing a story, so you might as well think about what you want to include in that story. Ready? Let's do this!   Key Takeaways: [01:04] Jeffrey Davis joined Charlie on episode 7: "Don’t Be an Idea Thief" [03:56] Jeffery thinks creativity is our biological and even spiritual impulse [04:33] One way that we're creative – we connect dots and find patterns  [07:04] We can be selective about our public story and still remain authentic [09:02] Jeffrey on putting forth the story you want to own [12:47] Stories can serve as windows and as mirrors [14:04] Jeffrey and Charlie discuss creativity and authenticity [17:16] Shaping the larger story of what you're about can be a really creative endeavor [20:46] Wanting to re-enter a story and the importance of the back story [23:45] What are the values or ideals that are driving us?  [24:25] Jeffrey talks about Paul Zak's research on the neuroscience of the narrative [27:11] Examples of ideal-driven companies that own their brand stories [34:25] Think about your core story, your legacy, and what you want to be known for [36:16] "Your brand is the total emotional experience that people have with you or your business" [37:05] Jeffrey on what it means to be a thought leader [39:01] Charlie on looking retroactively and asking, “what have I been standing for?”    Mentioned in This Episode: Episode 7 : "Don't Be an Idea Thief" with Jeffrey Davis Tracking Wonder Paul Zak’s research on the neuroscience of narrative Apple and Steve Jobs Jeff Bezos from amazon Brandon Page from Google Sam Walton from Walmart Joe Gebbia and his partners from Airbnb Method house cleaning American Giant Daniel Goleman and emotional intelligence  
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Episode 63 - Your Voice Can Be Transformational with Alexia Vernon
Branded a "Moxie Maven" by The White House Office of Public Engagement for her unique and effective approach to leadership development, through her 'Step Into Your Moxie' platform, Alexia has become the go-to expert for helping entrepreneurs, executives, online experts, and other thought leaders create, pitch, and perform their spotlight talks and design and execute transformational events. Alexia is also the founder and director of Influencer Academy, a women's leadership development program. Alexia not only cultivates the voices of thought leaders, she is one! Alexia has scored FaceTime with hundreds of corporate, conference and college audiences; with her key note speeches and interactive trainings; and she has contributed to media including CNN, NBC, The Wall Street Journal, Inc., Forbes, and Women's Health Magazine. I'm excited to have Alexia on the show, sharing her voice so that you can better use your voice!   Key Takeaways: [02:28] Alexia shares her origin story on how she got started with public speaking? [05:51] The powerful moment Alexia experienced at 4 years of age (aka Initial Act of Moxie) [07:12] The power and fears associated with speaking out to say what needs to be said [08:52] Alexia talks about gender differences in fear of public speaking [10:48] Charlie's theory on how women & men have been socialized to respond to rejection [11:39] Alexia’s 10 month program, rooted in leadership [13:57] Alexia shares on learning that we don't need to be great in everything we do [17:49] Charlie recommends The First 20 Hours by Josh Kaufman [18:35] Alexia shares her journey to public speaking after getting her BA in Women's Studies [21:37] Charlie wants to celebrate that Alexia hated being broke! [23:36] How did she ‘unlearn’ the idea business is contradictory to what I'm doing - how did that manifest for her? [27:12] Alexia talks on the different parts of their journey potential speakers might be facing [29:52] Alexia shares some insight on talking about topics that are more difficult or unpopular [33:48] What's most important is for people that need you to know that you are there for them! [35:47] Alexia gives a shout out to Toshia Shaw [38:14] How do people find their message? How do you get to "The idea"? [40:17] What stories do you share? [40:59] What do you do when your message starts changing? [43:38] Do what makes sense based on your circumstances [46:40] What's Alexia's big message today? [48:06] What's the most unanticipated challenge that Alexia is currently facing? [51:04] What does Alexa want people to remember about her & her body of work?   Mentioned in This Episode: Influencer Academy   Step Into Your Moxie The First 20 Hours by Josh Kaufman Jacquette Timmonson TCGS Woodhull Institute The pact by Toshia Shaw at TEDx Brene Brown on “Big Strong Magic”, from Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert
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Episode 62 - 5 Ways to Make Better Plans for the New Year
It's the time of year where we're thinking about setting new goals and new resolutions. On this final episode of 2015, Angela and Charlie wanted to take the time to talk about some things to think about as you’re setting intentions and new plans for the New Year. They’re excited to jump into the show. Ready? Let's do this!   Key Takeaways [01:12] What is Angela looking forward to for next year? [02:26] What to think about when you're creating plans for next year. [02:33] Do a review before you plan a new. [06:17] How did your actions for this year align with your values? [07:00] Why is it so important for us to review before we start planning? [09:50] How the negativity bias plays into New Year's resolutions. [12:49] Reviewing plans allows you to see the story in a very deep way. [13:18] Celebrate your daily & weekly progress instead of waiting for a huge ending to celebrate. [19:20] Focusing on our mundane progress builds processes that we really enjoy. [20:41] What you feed, grows – Make sure the things that matter to you are getting fed. [26:19] Focus on fewer goals – Choose the things that matter most & focus more of your energy on those things. [30:36] What to do when you get stuck and not sure what to do. [33:19] Celebrate what you have achieved this year!   Mentioned in This Episode: Sideways Isn't Necessarily the Wrong Way 5 Ways Reviewing Your Plans Can Enhance Your Success Vision Quest
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Episode 61 - Mixing Freelancing, Music, and Entrepreneurship with Graham Cochrane
The stories we often hear and tell ourselves about entrepreneurs, are that successful entrepreneurs somehow had it in their blood or it was always what they wanted to be. The problem is that a lot of people who are now entrepreneurs never thought they'd be one or even have a hard time owning the title now. Graham Cochrane joins me to talk about his journey from freelancer to a successful entrepreneur in the music industry.   About Graham Cochrane: Graham is a freelance recording and mix engineer living in Tampa, Florida; and he is the founder of one of the world's most loved audio recording and mixing blogs, The Recording Revolution, having over 200,000 readers each month. As a lifelong singer/song writer and musician, his passion for recording and mixing has grown from the bedroom studio, to university where he studied audio production, to multi-million dollar studios, to fortune 500 software companies; and all the while freelancing for artists and bands worldwide. Graham's work in business has been featured in Yahoo, Business Insider, and Creative Live to name a few. He thinks of himself as a musician and an artist and never thought he'd be in the position where he is now a success that other people are turning to.   Key Takeaways: [02:07] Graham shares on how he got started in the music business. [04:44] He returned the book Four Hour Work Week, because he thought it’s a fantasy. [05:59] Graham never thought it was in the cards for him to make a good living as a musician. [07:48] How did he get the idea he could make good money doing something he loves? [09:16] Feeling like an impostor makes it tough to feel confident at the beginning. [11:29] It takes having a vision that most of us don't have at the beginning. [13:53] We're not a good judge of what we can sell, so sometimes we have to try & that is how his blog started. [14:23] The thing we're best at, we undervalue the most! [15:45] Blogging is a great way to find out what people are willing to pay for. [16:30] What was the process of going from free to paid to premium content like for him? [19:34] Graham shares a few ways to make money as a content creator. [22:01] Major lessons he learned when first starting The Recording Revolution. [24:41] His entire business model is… [25:52] Spark moments & how his website's traffic doubled in just a month. [28:39] Graham’s advice for content creators when they're in the pre-hockey stick phase. [33:06] Graham summarizes his 3 pieces of advice. [34:16] Quality over quantity! [36:44] Don’t get away from the core of what made you great, plus more advice on succeeding. [40:16] People & relationships outweigh numbers. [43:45] Most people won't buy from you - create the best free content in your niche. [45:41] Front load with free content because it's like advertising & grows your audience. [48:17] You have to really like the content you're creating. [50:27] What is the most unanticipated challenge he is currently facing? [52:52] What is an unanticipated challenge he is facing on the personal level? [54:58] It’s important to learn to say ‘no’ as your business grows. [57:37] What is the one thing people should remember from Graham?   Mentioned in This Episode: The recording revolution The 4 Hour Workweek, by Tim Ferriss The Go Giver, by Bob Burg Impostor Syndrome, by Ramit Sethi Michael Hyette Ryan Lynch - niching down 3 levels Mr. Money Mustache - Personal Finance Blogger Career Renegade, by Jonathan Fields The Small Business Lifecycle  
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Episode 60: How to Make Email Work for You with Dmitri Leonov
Email has become the primary tool many of us use to communicate with others. We both love it and hate it, because like money, email can be a great servant but a terrible master. Dmitri Leonov joins Charlie Gilkey to jam about ways you can make email work for you rather than against you. Email is one of Charlie’s favorite topics to talk about and he’s ready to jump into it with Dmitri.   Key Takeaways: [0:48] Charlie introduces his guest, Dmitri Leonov [1:30] The current email landscape [2:31] The real reason for email overload is communication overload [2:44] Three factors that contribute to this [3:38] Becoming aware of how plugged in you are to everything by changing the context [6:55] The other thing you can do is to put your smart phone in a shoebox! [7:36] What else is it about the current email landscape that gets us to where we are? [9:31] Dmitri schedules an hour in his calendar called “email time”, each day [10:09] Charlie talks about the two posts he has written about this: Difference between checking email & processing email Don’t use your inbox as a to-do-list [11:50] Dmitri adds to this by introducing the process called “triage” [12:31] A hack he has found very useful [14:15] Don’t use your inbox as an archive and what to do instead [18:52] The Five Sentences Movement is about short & concise messages [21:45] Transactional vs. conversational email communication [24:25] Tags within email are an amazing development [25:58] What other best practices Dmitri suggests? The core is to triage! [28:10] The attention switching cost [28:33] Dmitri suggests a second best practice [31:42] We get stuck in the technological loop & it’s infinite [32:39] Dmitri shares other advanced Ninja moves [38:13] His favorite hack! [44:01] Dmitri’s one takeaway: “don’t make email your priority”   Mentioned in This Episode: Find BigMail Slack Boomerang Google Inbox SaneBox Gmail’s “Undo Send” The Black Hole - a tool developed by Dmitri’s group WiseStampt 1Password  
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Episode 59 - Debugging the Imposter Syndrome with Dan Pickett
The imposter syndrome is a major road block for many of us when it comes to doing our best work, especially if doing it requires us to start something new. “Who are you to do it?” rings so loudly inside us that we often can’t hear the other more helpful stories or see the other data points that show us that we’re on the right path. Dan Picket joins Charlie Gilkey for episode 59 to jam about how to debug the imposter syndrome.    Key Takeaways: [0:55] Who is Dan Picket? [1:02] Dan’s personal vision is to help people become the best version of themselves [1:45] How is the imposter syndrome working on him right now? [2:24] How did he get into programming? [3:25] How did Dan start out in software development and programming? [6:07] The stigma associated with software engineers. [8:32] Why did he make the jump from Launchware to Launch Academy? [10:59] How was the transition from entrepreneur to teacher? [13:48] Computer software engineering is a rapidly evolving and multi-faceted universe! [16:01] Disciplines that are in close periphery to software engineering are also affected by the pace of changing technology. [17:07] What qualifies Dan to start Launch Academy? [19:04] Imposter syndromes are so prevalent when you start something new. [19:42] Dan shares two small anecdotes on overcoming the imposter syndrome. [23:00] Only seeing the surface level of others’ work can make you feel like you’re not enough. [24:32] The ironic thing about the imposter syndrome: it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. [26:36] Negative thoughts and stories can feed our fears and make us feel like an imposter. [29:23] What would he do differently? Mindfulness. [34:12] Always go back to your core values to see if what you’re doing is in-line with them. [35:01] How does the imposter syndrome slide into the curriculum at Launch Academy? [37:03] The zone of proximal development [39:39] Advancement and growth only happens in discomfort. [41:00] What’s his biggest challenge right now? [44:52] Having patience and trust in others. [46:06] The beauty of hiring based on core values and cultural fit. [47:28] What is the one thing people could remember about Dan & his body of work from this episode?    Mentioned in this Episode: Launchware Launch Academy MIT Worcester Politech Agile Education Method Pam Slim Podcast (@ 22:04 min) The Feeling Good Handbook by Dr. Burns Emotional Obesity by Laura Coe The World’s Religions by Huston Smith Young Entrepreneurs Club  
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Episode 58 - How to Heal After the Loss of a Partner with Kristin Meekhof
Kristin Meekhof is a licenced Masters level social worker. She's a speaker, contributor to Huffington Post, a Maria Shriver “Architect of Change”, and the author of A Widow's Guide to Healing. She has been seen on Huffington Post Live, featured on American Greetings and at ABC Headquarters in New York. She has also been a panellist at the Parliament of World Religions. In 2007, she was 33 when her husband died from Adrenal cancer. About three years after his death, she decided that she wanted to interview as many widows as possible and put their narratives together in her book. She spent three and a half years talking with widows from various backgrounds to compile the book and share their stories. In 2014, Kristin traveled to Kenya and saw firsthand how widows live on less than a dollar a day. On today’s show, Kristin joins Charlie to talk about her experiences as a widow, and her experiences as an author who shared the stories of other widows in her recent book.   Key Takeaways: [02:51] Is this something that we talk enough about in our society? [02:57] Talking about loss & grief is a difficult conversation for people to have [04:23] How did Kristin go from loss & grief to writing her own book? [07:17] Clinical vs. narrative: which approach is more helpful for healing? [08:17] What are some of the common threads of the widows’ stories that she compiled? [09:20] Secondary losses that are caused by the primary loss [10:42] Intense loneliness, secondary losses, and financial concerns are major themes across stories [11:28] How different widows experience moving on with another partner [14:38] Mothers of younger children have different approaches in dealing with the void that’s left following the loss of a father [15:54] The widow label, and how it can have negative stigmas behind it [18:08] After her husband's passing, when were some moments that checking the 'widow box’ struck Kristin? [20:45] She talks on some assumptions that are made about widows [22:08] What happened to her professional life after she published her first book? [23:43] The opportunities or experiences that have surprised her [25:59] Kristin talks about the project in Kenya, where she witnessed how widows live on less than a dollar a day [27:37] What were some of the cross-cultural differences and convergences between the widows' experiences in Nairobi, Africa vs. those in the US [30:03] Now that her first book has been published, what is her next idea? [31:04] How can we be supportive or helpful as family or friends without overtaking the widow? [33:03] She shares some of the gems from Chapter 8, The best advice I never got: things widows know [35:21] In her own experience, what's been the most challenging aspect of being a widow? [37:25] How is she working through the “re-griefing effect”? [39:31] The physical effects of grief & how it affected Kristin’s health [41:42] The “loss spiral”: starts with losing one thing, then losing something else & it goes down from there [42:40] One of the changes that creeped up on her [44:53] What's she excited about going forward? [45:55] What does she want people to take away from this episode?   Mentioned in this Episode: A Widow's Guide to Healing by Kristin Meekhof Chelsea Dinsmore at Live your Legend Holocaust survivor Stephen Ross Deepack Chopra Architects of Change by Maria Shriver How widows live on less than a dollar a day (in Kenya) Parliament of World Religions Huffington Post    
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Episode 57 - What to Do When You Have Too Much to Do
Sometimes, you commit to a few things and then life intervenes and throws a few more things on your plate, and it can sometimes get away from you. You feel like "how am I going to do all of this?", "what do I need to let go?", "how do I handle my own expectations for what I'd be able to do?" - That's what Charlie Gilkey & Angela Wheeler will chat about on this episode.     Key Takeaways:   [02:08] Charlie talks about the major products he has going on at once   [05:03] Angela points out that each project has many other mini-projects within it [06:27] Self-care is about being gentler with yourself, not beating yourself up [07:24] A venn diagram analogy on ‘the work’ and ‘the story about the work’  [11:01] Feeling frustrated with yourself - what is it getting you? what is it doing for you? [13:56] Angela is harder on herself than on other members of the team [14:35] We wouldn't ride a donkey the way we ride ourselves, because it would be inhumane [15:21] You’re not a computer nor a robot, and can't work 24-7. You're human & stuff comes up  [16:29] How do you communicate with people when you have overcommitted and need help? [18:00] Ego prevents us from asking for help, but not asking is the worst thing you can do  [21:58] Asking for help can be seen as a weakness [23:40] Asking for help may feel like it's a 'taking' [25:50] Always ask the yea-sayers & people you trust, if they're willing to help you [28:25] Ask for help by welcoming people to be of service to you [28:54] You matter just as much as somebody else [30:55] How not to get there again by giving yourself enough room for a margin [32:50] People confuse focus and capacity [33:19] Proactive communication with others and with yourself [34:27] Choosing the projects that matter to you [38:53] Deciding what's really important and what to let go of, is hard, but worth it [39:50] Defining what you want your good life to look like - rather than what others think [40:18] Choosing projects and priorities that matter most to you and sticking to them      Mentioned in this Episode:   Live Your Legend Start Finishing [book proposal] Jeffrey Davis from Tracking Wonder   Rain Maker "No" vs. "Not now" Why strategic planning is so hard for creative people?    
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Episode 56 - Experience is the Best Teacher with Jordan Agolli
Jordan Agolli is a young, but highly experienced entrepreneur who is also the host of the Teenage Entrepreneur. He started his first business when he was 14-years-old, and grew the company to 20 employees by the time he was 18-years-old. In 2014, he founded Teenage Entrepreneur, which is a platform focused on educating and inspiring the younger generation to pursue entrepreneurship. The show has listeners in 65 countries. In 2015, he was hired as the director of operations for a company that helps business owners market their business through the Internet. Jordan's primary focus and passion is fixing operational breakdowns, building and maintaining relationships with clients, and managing day-to-day operations. On top of this, he is also the president of his bowling league, has a first degree black belt in a Japanese martial art. Jordan has his hands in a lot of projects, as do many Creative Giants. Charlie is excited to have him share his journey with us!   Key Takeaways: [02:24] Jordan shares his story on starting his own business when he was only 14-years-old. [05:11] Growing a company by using a hyper-local directory and cheap marketing. [09:27] A marketing strategy that leveraged being young and ambitious ‘high schoolers’ [11:01] College didn’t work for Jordan, so he worked full-time in his own business. [13:08] What was it about college that he didn't like, wasn't for him. [13:47] Jordan never wanted college to work for him. [15:17] Institutions box you into a system & that was his issue with school from the get go. [18:08] There’s a false perception that overestimates high schoolers’ understanding of the ‘online world’. [18:17] Fizzle was the first resource to teach Jordan about the online business world. [19:46] The Internet and social media can be leveraged to market and grow your business. [21:16] How Teenage Entrepreneur was born [22:32] Discovering podcasting and the online community is what brought him to where he is today [23:58] How he got involved in managing operations and talking to sought-after CEOs [29:28] It’s better to focus on one thing than to spread yourself thin [30:33] Three major lessons Jordan has learned [34:03] Putting yourself out there and the value of experience [35:12] In order to grow and take it to the next level, he'll be going back into the entrepreneurial world   Mentioned in This Episode: The Aha! connection Yelp Angie’s List Fizle Chase Reeves Podcast Movement Snap Chat Tweeter Instagram Vine John Dumas Chris Ducker Chase Jarvis David France Babson entrepreneurship forum Global entrepreneurship program, for the United States Suzan Scot’s Fierce Conversations
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Episode 55 - Planning Creates Luck with Rebecca Rescate
Rebecca is a serial entrepreneur who creates problem solving consumer goods that are in the hands of over half million people around the world, and have been featured in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, multiple episodes of ABC's Shark Tank, Good Morning America and more. Rescate began her entrepreneurial career at the age of 25 in New York City. In the past decade, she has built four brands with unique creative products, including: CityKitty, HoodiePillow, Top.Down Planner, and Blankie Tails; while raising 3 children and residing in Yardley Pennsylvania with her husband. Rebecca joins Charlie to discuss one of his favorite topics: planning; and about how plans drive us toward success and happiness and also create luck.    Key Takeaways: 02:12 – What lead Rebecca to create Top.Down Planner 03:41 – The methodology that Top.Down planning is based on 04:59 – What if we just focus on the things that are of high value to us 07:36 – The importance of incorporating values in planning 09:04 – The ‘values exercise’ in Top.Down Planners 11:11 – When your values don’t align with how you are doing business 14:06 – How not to say ‘yes’ to everything and prioritizing your values in planning 17:12 – Difference between ‘planning’ and ‘planners’ or ‘schedulers’    21:09 – Spear-heading a re-education on planning 23:34 – Rebecca talks about Blankie Tails 25:16 – Rebecca talks about CityKitty 29:36 – Doubling down on Blankie Tails 31:53 – The 2016 version of Top.Down Planner and inventory management 33:58 – Some pros and cons of manufacturing products in the US 38:05 – Planning for and running four different businesses 41:56 – The power of planning 43:20 – From baby steps to bigger plans    Mentioned in This Episode: CityKitty HoodiePillow Top.Down Planner Blankie Tails the Pareto Principle Franklin Covey 3.Purpose Staples Office Depot Google Calendar Daniela Port's desire mapping Uber Steve Jobs Uggs Instagram Kitchen Aide Shark Tank Calphalon  
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Episode 54 - The Power of Meditation with Susan Piver
Susan Piver makes a reappearance on this week's episode to talk about meditation. Susan was featured on episode four of The Creative Giant Show, so be sure to check out her first interview with Charlie after you listen to this one. Susan Piver has an international reputation for being an exceptionally skillful meditation teacher and shares valuable insight on how to start a meditation practice and make it stick.   Key Takeaways: [2:50] Susan's book, Start Here Now, is out. [5:50] What really counts as meditation? [7:45] In meditation you don't have to stop thinking. [10:45] Every person Susan knows thinks they're not disciplined in their practice. [15:55] The answer is right in front of you, but we often prefer to get distracted and take shortcuts. [18:10] Being present means letting go of what you know. [20:00] Susan talks about her 'Aimless Wandering' practice. [22:25] Practicing in the beginning can make you anxious, but it naturally goes away overtime. [25:20] How long -really- is three minutes? [28:55] There are three kinds of laziness. Susan explains. [33:30] What does it mean to be a Buddhist? [37:45] What can you do if you're not near a Buddhist/meditation center or community? [41:35] Charlie talks about his own practice. [46:25] Does meditation get easier? [48:35] Give yourself 5-10-15 minutes to be in the present.   Mentioned In This Episode: http://www.productiveflourishing.com/what-counts-as-meditation/ https://insighttimer.com/ The Heart of Unconditional Love by Tulku Thondup The Sacred Path of The Warrior series by  Chogyam Trungpa http://susanpiver.com/ Start Here Now by Susan Piver. http://www.productiveflourishing.com/episode-four-susan-piver/  
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Episode 53 - Balancing Self Care and Showing Up
Angela Wheeler joins Charlie Gilkey in today's podcast episode. Charlie and Angela talk on how sometimes it's difficult to practice self-care and take care of all of your responsibilities at the same time. The two explore the subject of self-care and talk on why they're not feeling 100% at the best on the show.   Key Takeaways: [2:05] Charlie and Angela weren't in the best of places today. [3:20] Maybe we use the excuse of not feeling well to avoid responsibilities. [4:15] Look at your schedule two weeks in the past and assume it'll be the same. [6:30] Not looking your best is different for everybody. [9:00] Self-care is the highest priority. [14:00] When is that thing you're putting off going to get done? [17:40] Don't be a victim of the 9-5 schedule. [20:50] Are the important things showing up in your schedule? [24:40] Remember, you can't do everything. [28:00] Take care of yourself, your priorities, and do your best. [29:50] What are you doing to take care of yourself and what are you doing today to build a better tomorrow?   Mentioned In This Episode: http://www.productiveflourishing.com/  
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Episode 52 - Making Tech Startups More Human-Friendly with Nathalie Molina Nino
Nathalie Molina Niño launched her first tech startup at the age of 20 and then later graduated with a degree in playwriting at Columbia University. In 2012, Nathalie co-founded a non-profit at the Athena Center for Leadership studies of Barnard College at Columbia University, where she advises young women entrepreneurs. Nathalie talks on how she got her head start in the tech industry and why she's working to fix the large gender and minority gap in the tech world.   Key Takeaways: [3:05] How did Nathalie get started in her career? [7:00] Why did Nathalie burn out? [9:30] We often forget we can define our boundaries. [11:30] We stop making good decisions after about 36-40 hours of work. [12:10] How did Nathalie get involved in her non-profit Entrepreneurs@Athena? [13:40] Nathalie is much more open now about talking about the core problems in tech. [16:30] There's a big group of people who are lazily uninformed about the gender and minority divide. [19:20] The tech culture is toxic and unfriendly to women. [22:10] Why aren't there more women in C-level positions? Nathalie explains why. [24:20] How can we make corporate and tech culture more friendly? [27:45] Nathalie believes we should focus on building healthy workplace culture on the entrepreneurial side of things, not in slow-moving corporate. [31:00] Charlie shares why he believes more women are leaving corporate to start their own businesses. [35:40] Nathalie talks about Power To Fly and why she got involved. [40:00] How did Power To Fly get 6+ million dollars in investor funds? [47:40] What's the most unanticipated challenge Nathalie is currently facing? [50:40] The one takeaway you need to know about Nathalie? You can be successful and still be kind.   Mentioned In This Episode: http://www.productiveflourishing.com/episode-18-factoring-tech-startup-world-thursday-bram/ https://www.powertofly.com/ http://nathaliemolina.biz  
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Episode 51: How to Thrive as Life AND Business Partners with Angela Wheeler
Charlie Gilkey and Angela Wheeler have been together for over 18 years and discuss on today's podcast what's it like working with each other. Angela shares her struggles on leaving her academia career, catching up with Charlie's four year learning curve in the business, and surviving a near-death experience. Charlie and Angela talk on the importance of understanding each other's cycles and rhythms and to have boundaries in the relationship where it's not all work and no play.   Key Takeaways: [1:50] Angela talks a little bit about her background.  [4:30] Working with your partner is great, but there can also be bumps in the road. [7:40] Charlie and Angela have been in business together since 2010. [8:40] What kind of challenges did Angela face when she joined Charlie's business? [15:50] Charlie and Angela have been together for 18 years and have had a lot of time to grow together. [20:00] The difference in income can be awkward with your partner. [25:50] Working around your partner's natural rhythm can be challenging. [30:45] Three years after the car crash, the couple can finally talk about what happened. [31:30] Charlie talks about Angela's near-death experience. [37:10] After Angela's accident, Charlie had to plan for Angela not to be a part of the business and setup the business up accordingly. [43:10] Admitting your weaknesses can be hard, but once you do, you can build a stronger business. [47:40] So what is it like working with your life partner? [51:00] You can share something meaningful together. [52:40] Be transparent with your partner and have an open communication with them at all times.   Mentioned In This Episode: The Five Love Languages by Gary D. Chapman  
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Episode 50 - GRIT to Great with Linda Kaplan Thaler
Linda Kaplan Thaler is an advertising luminary and author who is also the cofounder of the Kaplan Thaler Group and chairman of Publicis New York. She has created many iconic advertising campaigns such as Kodak Moments and the Aflac duck. She is a native New Yorker who has co-authored three bestselling books: Bang!: Getting Your Message Heard in a Noisy World, The Power of Nice, and The Power of Small. Her newest book is called Grit to Great, which she also co-authored with her business partner Robin Koval. The book takes readers back to the old-fashioned concept of it taking grit to make you successful, rather than relying on your talent, luck, or ability. Linda joins Charlie on the show to talk about that and much more.   Key Takeaways: 02:02 – How Linda met Robin Koval. 03:57 – The idea of having grit and getting the idea to write a book about it. 07:42 – Grit never expires and the idea of retirement. 12:34 – The “lure” of retirement and how retirement should really be doing a job that you love. 16:26 – The self-esteem movement. 20:06 – Grit can be found in anybody no matter the age. 22:58 – Learn to accept failure. 25:32 – “Comfort addiction” and how we are a culture that doesn’t know how to be bored. 28:50 – Which grit builder practice Linda feels is the hardest for her at this stage in her life. 32:02 – The power of habit. 38:50 – The most unanticipated challenge Linda is currently facing. 40:12 – Everybody can get to where they want to go. Grit is the formula that gets you there.     Mentioned in This Episode: Kaplan Thaler Group Publicis New York Bang!: Getting Your Message Heard in a Noisy World The Power of Nice The Power of Small Robin Koval Grit to Great Michael Bloomberg Colin Powell Steven Spielberg Michael Jordan Jack Ma, Alibaba Sherry Lansing, Paramount Pictures James Henry, In a Fisherman’s Language James Dyson Neil Postman, We’re Amusing Ourselves to Death Todd Kashdan and Robert Biswas-Diener, The Upside of Your Dark Side Paula Radcliffe James Patterson Stephen King  
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Episode 49 - Financial Success Doesn’t Start in Your Wallet with Jacquette Timmons
Jacquette Timmons is a financial behaviorist who helps her clients figure out how to connect their money to life in a real and meaningful way. She offers unbiased advice and helps people gain insight and clarity that they might not otherwise get on their own. She helps people blend the emotions of money with the math of money so they can move forward with their financial goals and take control. She is the founder of Sterling Investment Management, Inc. and also wrote a book titled Financial Intimacy, How to Create a Healthy Relationship with Your Money and Your Mate. Her work has been featured many places including CNN, HLN, Fox, and NPR, among others. Jacquette joins Charlie on the show today and talks about the importance of having discussions about our money as well as much more.   Key Takeaways: 01:43 – How Jacquette got started as a financial behaviorist. 05:54 – What does a financial behaviorist do? 09:09 – Understanding decision making around money is a more irrational thing and the trends and differences between the way men and women make decisions about money. 14:13 – People not really having true conversations about their money and not seeing that it’s an ongoing conversation and why that is. 21:15 – Having to make hard financial decisions such as putting money toward the care of a pet. 26:10 – Some things to do to help make those difficult financial decisions. 30:33 – Recognizing and dealing with the fact that everything about money is emotional and that our decisions we make about money are often based on emotions. 34:48 – Jacquette’s book, Financial Intimacy, How to Create a Healthy Relationship with Your Money and Your Mate. 37:56 – Surprising feedback Jacquette has gotten about her book and finding help in knowing other people’s situations. 42:24 – Financial success doesn’t start in your wallet. 48:44 – Being smart with money is a skill. 50:28 – The most unanticipated challenge Jacquette is currently facing. 54:11 – Money is never just about money.     Mentioned in This Episode: Sterling Investment Management, Inc. Financial Intimacy, How to Create a Healthy Relationship with Your Money and Your Mate CNN HLN Fox Black Enterprise NPR The Wall Street Journal Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational Carnegie Institute of Technology The Small Business Lifecycle  
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Episode 48 - Love As Your Strategic Foundation with Sarah Jones
Sarah Jones is the founder of Introverted Alpha, a place to help introverted men attract women naturally. Her work has been featured in various places including Cosmo and Business Insider and many other. Along with being a dating coach, Sarah also uses Introverted Alpha to help support the cause of ending human trafficking. She joins Charlie on the show today to discuss these topics and much more.   Key Takeaways: 01:46 – How Sarah got started doing what she does now. 04:50 – How Sarah found her niche. 08:40 – The differences in coaching men and women. 11:05 – The friend zone. 13:32 – Sarah discusses her discomfort level of coaching and talking to men about their sexuality. 16:23 – The pickup community. 20:21 – The idea of men just wanting sex. 23:49 – Whether or not Sarah has received any backlash against what she’s doing. 27:37 – Sarah learning to be a more strategic thinker in what she was doing. 34:10 – Sarah’s cause around human trafficking. 37:48 – The link between men’s sexual desire and human trafficking. 42:44 – The most unanticipated challenge Sarah is currently facing and why she thinks that’s a challenge. 48:50 – Find the things that you love about yourself and do things that will nourish that.   Mentioned in This Episode: Introverted Alpha Cosmo Business Insider The Good Men Project YourTango The San Francisco Chronicle The Game, Neil Strauss Reddit Ramit Sethi, Zero to Launch Not For Sale Managing for Results, Peter Drucker  
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Episode 47 - The Future of the Creative Giant Show with Charlie Gilkey
Charlie takes a few minutes in this episode to discuss the future of the show and the direction he would like to take it.   Key Takeaways: 00:47 – “Bullets, cannonballs, and tripwires.” 01:36 – Why Charlie wanted to get to 50 episodes. 03:33 – People saying they want more of Charlie on the podcast. 04:28 – Charlie not wanting the show to be another “how-to” show. 05:00 – How to figure out the two tensions of people wanting more Charlie on the show and it not being a “how-to” show. 07:08 – The challenges of keeping the show at 30 minutes and it still being really good. 09:35 – Going forward with the show and what that looks like. 10:10 – The publishing schedule of the podcast. 12:14 – Going through and experimental phase with the show. 13:01 – Ways to help out with the show.   Mentioned in This Episode: Great by Choice, Jim Collins Donald Rumsfeld productiveflourishing.com/podcast charlie@productiveflourishing.com productiveflourishing.com/contact    
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Episode 46 - Make Your Message Match Your Mission with Brigitte Lyons
Brigitte Lyons is a media specialist who founded B, a boutique PR agency helping organizations and individuals move their ideas. She teaches entrepreneurs how to take media outreach into their own hands. Brigitte is an advocate for emerging talent, and those she has helped have gone on to get coverage from cnn.com, The Huffington Post, Elle Décor, espn.com, and more. She encourages people to be relentlessly focused on what they’re doing in order to get their work out there to make an impact in the world. She joins Charlie on the show today to discuss her work and much more.   Key Takeaways: 01:28 – How Brigitte got started in the PR business. 04:32 – Is PR even relevant anymore? 07:58 – The value of a publicist for some people and why people come to Brigitte. 14:24 – Brigitte making the switch to work with more creative types and artists and some of the challenges that came along with that. 16:22 – Why Brigitte is happier getting out and working one-on-one, face-to-face with people rather than just sitting at her computer by herself. 19:40 – The idea that big problems need big teams. 21:55 – Why Brigitte doesn’t want to work solo by herself but also doesn’t necessarily think being a big company is for her either. 26:10 – What scares Brigitte about the transition she is making. 33:04 – Ryan Holiday’s methods for PR and what he does. 35:18 – Why Brigitte’s work matters so much to her. 41:19 – The cause, topic, or issue Brigitte feels the strongest about but isn’t using her voice for and why that is. 47:25 – Be relentless focused on what you’re doing to make a bigger impact with your work.   Mentioned in This Episode: B cnn.com Elle Décor The Huffington Post espn.com Multipotentialites Forbes The New York Times Twitter Gallup Reddit Tara Gentile charity:water IDEO Apple Basecamp Duarte The Energy Project, Tony Schwartz Action Station, Marianne Elliott Ryan Holiday All Marketers are Liars Trust Me, I’m Lying TechCrunch Gawker American Apparel Amazon Cal Newport, So Good They Can’t Ignore You Black Lives Matter Airbnb    
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Episode 45 - Different is Awesome with Ryan Haack
Ryan Haack is an author, blogger, and speaker who was born without a left hand. In 2011, he launched his website, livingonehanded.com, in an effort to help people embrace the things that make them different and realize that they are still valuable and important. He writes about his experiences as someone who was born with a physical difference and tries to give hope to others who may be dealing with the same kind of thing. He also speaks at schools on this subject and recently released his first children’s book titled Different is Awesome. Ryan joins Charlie on the show today to discuss his work and his perspective on what it means to be different as well as much more.   Key Takeaways: 01:31 – Why and how Ryan started his website back in 2011. 04:06 – Ryan going most of his life not even thinking about the fact that he only had one hand and then suddenly being more aware of it after starting his website. 08:43 – What Ryan’s arm looks like and why he is so comfortable talking about it. 13:18 – Always thinking people want to help you because they pity you and not viewing it as them just being nice and accept it. 18:32 – The dual nature of saying you’re not any different than anybody else when you have a disability but also bringing awareness to the fact that you are different. 21:49 – Ryan’s Kickstarter for his book. 28:20 – The message of Ryan’s book. 31:45 – Seeing the value in yourself will make you see the value in other people. 33:56 – Ryan hopes that people will feel encouraged and valuable because of the work he is doing.   Mentioned in This Episode: livingonehanded.com Different Is Awesome Xanga W.E.B. Du Bois Brené Brown Glenda Watson Hyatt The Art of Asking, Amanda Palmer Kickstarter Kyle Maynard Judith Caseley, Harry and Willy and Carrothead Wes Molebash Kyle Scheele InterVarsity Sleeping at Last, Ryan O’Neal    
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Episode 44 - Fight for What You Believe In with Willie Jackson
Willie Jackson is the founder and publisher of Abernathy, a magazine for black men. He is also a tech consultant and a member of Seth Godin’s Domino Project. He is an advisor and has worked with several bestselling authors and entrepreneurs as well as speaking regularly at conferences. Previously, he served as the director of Web optimization for W3 EDGE, an interactive Web development and marketing agency. Abernathy is his latest project that was started partly because of the events in Ferguson and the Black Lives Matter movement. Willie joins Charlie on the show to discuss the weighty issues of race and police brutality as well as much more about his career.   Key Takeaways: 02:24 – Willie leaving working in consultancy and getting in to doing his own thing. 06:38 – Why Willie didn’t like the corporate business world. 12:10 – Starting W3 EDGE and how the idea formed. 16:08 – Some of the challenges with W3 EDGE. 21:15 – The importance of taking the time to connect with other people and acknowledge how hard things can be. 24:01 – Why and how Willie formed Abernathy and his feelings on the Michael Brown story. 33:27 – Abernathy being a magazine specifically for black men and issues of race that aren’t talked about enough. 42:06 – The case about Sandra Bland. 47:09 – What Willie has learned from launching and growing Abernathy. 51:43 – Willie wanting people to know that he cares about people being touched by what Abernathy is about and benefitting from it.   Mentioned In This Episode: Abernathy Seth Godin’s Domino Project Black Lives Matter Lift Off Retreat INROADS W3 EDGE Accenture Michael Brown Mark Zuckerberg Yoyodyne Yahoo Worse Than Slavery Nate Silver Hillary Clinton Sandra Bland Basecamp MailChimp The YEC abernathymagazine.com/launch  
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Episode 43 - The Art of Work with Jeff Goins
Many of us don’t know exactly what we want to be. We wander through life dissecting our likes and our wants without realizing this is a process which gives our calling time to present itself. Life’s dopamine shots of getting it now can interfere with your ability to share your gift. If you write call yourself a writer, if you paint a painter, etc. If you believe it others will too. Jeff’s work  embodies his past experiences and it shares how he overcame his previous assumptions about what path he should be on. He believes we should ask ourselves “If I am in the same place as I am today 10 years will I regret it?”   Key Takeaways: [1:20] I always thought I would be an artist [3:17] Building an online community for a non-profit [4:59] I had a freelance writing website but no personal brand [7:02] Who exactly got pregnant and being in a dangerous place [10:05] Coaching, teaching and leading [13:45] The 7 steps you need to achieve your dreams [18:10] Expand the use of “finding your calling” [19:34] Are we too busy to listen to our lives [23:22] Assumptions about paths you find in life [27:21] Everybody quit their job, which was not my intention [28:12] I wrote this book to touch people and it’s working [30:09] Organizational challenges and acquiring discipline [33:20] The responsibility of sharing your gift with the world   Mentions: TheArtofWork Goinswriter.com TheSmallBusinessLifecycle
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Episode 42 - Live a Savvy Life with Stephanie Carls
The impression that you make while connecting on social media can help you land the perfect job or it can haunt you. Your online personal brand is what the world sees so, make certain it is authentically you. It may be difficult in the future to cover up any regrets. In this 24 hour socially engaged world realize, it is ok to say no and ok to step offline for Its important to reasses the image you want to promote, as well as the path you want to take towards your future.   Key Takeaways: [1:34] Stephanie took note of powerhouse women in social media [4:14] The passion for video weaves through Stephanie’s life [6:08] Tips and Tricks in video got me noticed [8:24] Ahead of the curve using YouTube annotations but not on mobile [10:30] The book that helped developed my personal brand [11:28] Take a step back and it’s ok to say no [13:28] Talking about the toll it takes to be successful [15:17] Working for someone else was the next step [17:04] There were no notifications on Twitter or Facebook at the time [20:00] Get used to the stats and then measure your success in reactions [24:06] You are connected but you are really not connected [25:41] The impression of connecting [28:00] What you put on social media should be who you are, it matters [31:43] Your digital footprint  [33:52] Can you have an after 5 profile and a business profile [35:20] A day job that carries over into managing a digital lifestyle [37:52] Finding the time for everything is a challenge [39:43] Take into consideration the digital footprint you are leaving   Mentions: Trust Agents Chris Brogan Moto 360  Alone Together  - Sherry Turkle My Savvy Life 
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Episode 41: Which Wolf Will You Feed?
Charlie talks briefly on the show today about an old Native American parable about an evil wolf and a good wolf and which wolf we feed. It’s about the battle that goes on inside of us. Do we choose to feed the good or the bad in us? He addresses that in this week’s show.   Key Takeaways: 00:50 – Native American parable. 01:58 – It’s not just one choice of which wolf we are feeding. It’s a long history of making that choice. 04:21 – Whatever energy we put into the world, we get back.  05:05 – Choose to feed the good wolf, even in those moments when it seems easier to feed the bad wolf.   Mentioned In This Episode: David Gray, “Flame Turns Blue” Amos Lee  
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Episode 40 - Your Work is a Gift with James Victore
James Victore is a graphic artist, author, and activist who describes his art as “sexy” and strives to help people find their creative courage through talks and workshops. He has numerous high-profile clients and his posters have been displayed in places like the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Library of Congress, among others. In addition to his life-changing talks and workshops, James also reaches people through his YouTube video series Burning Questions where he answers questions about life, love, and work. On top of all that, James also has a book out called Victore, Or Who Died and Made You Boss? He lives in Brooklyn and works with his wife, Laura. James joins Charlie on the show to talk about his life, work, and much more.   Key Takeaways: 02:27 – James’ first gig. 04:26 – Moments in James’ career that made him realize he needed to do his own art and not try to be like somebody else. 08:15 – Practicing creative courage. 11:22 – Artists and designers understanding that their work is a gift. 13:55 – The tension of wanting to create what you love but also having to pay the bills and work within the restrictions of a company. 18:38 – James not conforming to what other people want, his “sexy” brand, and walking the line between sacred and profane. 21:18 – Deciding when to take jobs and when not to and making those decision based on what makes you happy and not just because you need the money. 26:45 – The idea of the reluctant hero. 36:20 – The most unanticipated challenge James is currently facing. 40:13 – When people ask James what he’s most proud of, it’s always his sons.   Mentioned in This Episode: Burning Questions YouTube Museum of Modern Art The Louvre Library of Congress Art Directors Club Brno Biennale Adobe MailChimp Starbucks Bobbi Brown Cosmetics Aveda Time and Esquire magazines Moet & Chandon Yohji Yamamoto Abrams Publishing Victore, Or Who Died and Made You Boss? School of Visual Arts Jeffrey Davis Maslow’s hierarchy of needs Julian Schnabel Joseph Campbell Star Wars Dead Poets Society Will Smith Your Work as a Gift   Victory Lab
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Episode 39 - Be True to Yourself with Natalie Sisson
Known as the Suitcase Entrepreneur, Natalie Sisson has been traveling the world and living out of her suitcase since 2006 while also running a successful online business from her laptop that generates a six-figure income. She is a number-one bestselling author, podcaster, speaker, and adventure and is on a mission to help entrepreneurs create true freedom in their lives by 2020. Natalie joins Charlie on the show today to discuss her adventuresome lifestyle, how she grew her business, upcoming changes, and much more.   Key Takeaways: 2:04 – How Natalie got started in entrepreneurship and what made her want to do it. 4:35 – Natalie’s first business and what ultimately led her to leave and move on. 8:37 – Challenges Natalie faced in the first years of Suitcase Entrepreneur and what she saw as the most challenging areas of business. 12:11 – Spark moments in the first years of Suitcase Entrepreneur that let Natalie know she should keep going. 13:20 – Something Natalie learned that she wishes someone had told her before she started. 18:25 – The balance between always talking about yourself and your experiences but using that to help teach others. 19:33 – The process Natalie took in writing and publishing her book. 25:27 – Getting over the fear of asking people to support your work and help you. 28:38 – Natalie’s views on freedom. 31:41 – New things and changes coming up in Natalie’s life and work and what led to making those changes. 36:33 – The most unanticipated challenge Natalie is facing right now. 37:36 – Be true to yourself and comfortable with whatever decision you make at the time.   Mentioned in This Episode: suitcaseentrepreneur.com Freedom Plan Program Facebook Connection Point Systems FundRazr Seth Godin Jonathan Fields Fresh in Fifteen podcast Kickstarter Scrivener Pam Slim The Art of Asking, Amanda Palmer Tim Ferriss Chris Guillebeau
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Episode 38 - Every Day Is A Pivotal Point with Kevin Briggs
Sergeant Kevin Briggs is a retired California Highway Patrol officer who spent most of his time on the Golden Gate Bridge encouraging people not to commit suicide by jumping. He was nicknamed the guardian of the Golden Gate Bridge and has helped over 200 people make the decision not to end their life. After retiring, he continued his work by traveling worldwide to speak on the subjects of crisis management, suicide prevention, and leadership skills. He speaks and teaches at conferences and law enforcement departments, as well as consulting and advising major companies and corporations. His story has been featured in numerous magazines and newspapers, which includes him being a cancer survivor, dealing with heart issues, and going through a divorce. He is currently working on his autobiography set to release in July of 2015. Kevin joins Charlie on the show today to discuss his work and knowledge of crisis management, share some personal stories, and much more.   Key Takeaways: 02:35 – Kevin’s first encounter on the Golden Gate Bridge. 06:01 – The little amount of training Kevin had received before taking his first suicide call and why that is. 08:43 – The emotional journey Kevin goes through when taking a suicide call and how it changes his perspective on life. 11:06 – Kevin’s second suicide encounter. 12:57 – Handling compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma and Kevin’s own depression. 15:55 – The importance of police officers and others in that field of work getting help for their stress and depression they may feel after seeing the things that they see. 19:14 – What the Quality of Life Triad is and where that came from. 21:43 – The importance of self-care and the resistance Kevin faces from fellow officers. 25:14 – Why people are so reluctant to seek help. 27:55 – Kevin’s RELEASE model. 31:55 – Tips on how to listen to someone and help them without judging or telling them what they need to do. 33:45 – Kevin’s own personal situation he dealt with when finding out his son was cutting. 38:44 – The importance of communicating and talking with your family and friends.   Mentioned In This Episode: The New Yorker Magazine People Magazine USA Today Pivotal Points Quality of Life Triad RELEASE model
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Episode 37 - Do What You Can, When You Can with Carla Birnberg
The smartest thing Carla ever did with regards to writing her book is collaborating with a person who was just as emotionally involved as she was. She was so used to going full throttle all the time she needed to learn that you can ask for help or even quit it for a while and go back to it later. She found that using online collaboration tools allowed the words to flow and increased her and her partner’s productivity. The only part of the process she found difficult was when asking for blurbs, even when Venus Williams offered to write cover quote.   Key Takeaways: [2:40] How Carla got to where she is today [4:20] Blogging is great because there is instant feedback [5:42] Simple teaching stemmed from simple learning techniques [6:55] My name was cutesy because that’s what bloggers did [9:04] People embraced my change [9:59] Struggle is universal, it’s more than fitness [11:30] Apologizing for what? [11:59] Being processed oriented versus outcome oriented [13:26] The smartest thing we ever did was become emotionally invested [14:40] Sorry this letter is so long. I didn’t have time to make it shorter [15:57] Splitting up the chapters helped us enjoy the tight deadline [18:12] This is how I flow now [19:53] Collaboration can open up so many ideas [20:41] The book was the easy part, the blurbs caused the friction [22:33] The cover quote was a reach [23:58] The Art of Asking [25:38] I rock the NO [26:27] It was the right time to write the book [27:20] Quitting and moving on doesn’t mean that you can’t go back to it [27:54] Well where to now? What’s next? [29:30] The beginning of the #wycwyc [30:18] All of our struggles are the same [30:59] Comfortability with yourself   Mentions: CarlaBirnberg #wycwyc TheArtofAsking - Amanda Palmer
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Episode 36: Write Your Own Future with Ali Luke
Ali Luke is an author, blogger, entrepreneur, and mother who blogs about writing on her website Aliventures. She is also the creator of Writers’ Huddle, a teaching community site for writers. She started writing online in 2008 and has since become a regular blogger on popular websites. She is also the author of Publishing E-Books For Dummies and the novel Lycopolis. Ali joins Charlie on the show today to talk about the challenges of being a working writer, mother, and entrepreneur, how having two small children has made her change the way she views her work and her business, offer advice for up and coming writers and bloggers, as well as much more.   Key Takeaways: 02:06 – How Ali got started in online writing. 04:28 – Knowing that jumping to blog writing was going to work as a long-term career and launching her first e-book. 05:58 – How easy it is to break into blogging. 08:14 – What staff blogging is. 09:18 – Why Ali enjoys waking up and writing every day. 10:45 – Switching from writing blogs to e-books and also her novel. 14:23 – How being pregnant and becoming a mother changed things in Ali’s career and writing. 19:13 – The challenge of balancing being an entrepreneur and being a mother. 25:04 – Some of the hardest aspects of going back to work after having children. 27:05 – The difficulty of making the transition from one thing to another. 34:49 – How the e-book world is growing and why that excites Ali. 38:20 – The fear people have of putting their work out there for people to see. 46:32 – The most unanticipated challenge Ali is currently facing. 51:07 – If Ali can succeed in being a mom, author, blogger, and entrepreneur, anybody can. There should be nothing stopping you.   Mentioned in This Episode: Publishing E-Books For Dummies Lycopolis Aliventures Writers’ Huddle Copyblogger Write to Done Men with Pens The Creative Pen Problogger Daily Blog Tips Productive Flourishing WordPress Staff Blogging Course Brian Clark BuzzFeed Dumb Little Man Amazon Kobo Melissa Dinwiddie NaNoWriMo Stephen King Fifty Shades of Grey, E.L. James   The Quotable Coach, Barry Demp
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Episode 35: Weave Your Magic into Your Life with Andrew Bennett
Andrew Bennett is a former Fortune 500 corporate executive and started his career working as H. Ross Perot's personal assistant. Andrew teaches corporations his transformation framework, which he developed through his passion and understanding of magic. He uses three principles for incorporating change into a company – appear, disappear, and restore and in the episode he explains further how this framework has improved businesses and professional relationships. Andrew shares to Charlie his personal struggles and life story, finding meaning in his life, and his passion for magic.   Key Takeaways: [2:05] Andrew talks about how he got started. [6:45] When we get comfortable, we will miss important life-changing opportunities. [10:10] Andrew talks about the first time he incorporated a magic trick in a business presentation. [12:55] When Andrew hit rock bottom and lost all of his material possessions and was bankrupt, he knew that he had a higher purpose. [20:30] We're not meant to 'just survive'. We're suppose to thrive and our scars enable us to thrive. [29:30] Good leaders focus on making their employees better people. [32:25] How has Andrew's magic helped him in business today? [37:40] Andrew's framework is appear, disappear, and restore. [39:40] What's Andrew's most unanticipated challenging that he's facing right now? [43:20] The final takeaway? People don't realize there's a lot of power in hope.
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Episode 34: Living a Full-Color Life with Melissa Dinwiddie
Melissa evangelizes that feeding your creative hungers is one of the fastest routes to happiness. As a happiness catalyst and creativity instigator Melissa empowers people to find and follow their callings, create their art and share their work because that’s how you will change the world. An artist in multiple forms Melissa models living a full color life and shares her writings, artwork and music on her blog, Living a Creative Life where you can also find her podcast Live Creative Now.    Key Takeaways: [1:04] Melissa lived in shades of gray and has transitioned to full color [3:11] The sustainable calligraphy business [4:48] A personal crisis that sent me into the gutter and then to create Living a Creative Life [8:00] The universe tell you when it’s time. If you don’t listen it will hit you with a 2x4 [13:18] Understanding your creative process is key [15:25] Melissa hadn’t been given the business gene. She was in the wrong line [17:44] Even an abundance of praise can make you question your creativity. Mindset helps [23:00] I don’t care it’s crap. Live in a creative sandbox with your ridiculously achievable goals [24:47] How to work through the tension of achieving your goals and obtaining motivation [32:25] Ultimate value refers to personal value and not necessarily technical skills [36:25] Prolificness allows you to get it out there and then the ability to build upon it [38:15] Finding the challenges and needs of others can be extremely satisfying. Love your job! [41:41] Delegating tasks and letting go of things seems hard but it can free you to be in the flow [46:29] Doing your creative thing is not self indulgent   Mentions In This Episode: Mindset - Carol Dweck TinyHabits - BJ Fogg TheImperfectionManifesto CreativeSandboxRules 750Words Rainmaker 
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Episode 033: The 12 Challenges of Creative Giants
Charlie talks today on the show about what it means to be a creative giant and why he uses that term, challenges a creative giant may face, what it means and how to “stand tall,” and more.   Key Takeaways: 01:13 – What creative giants are. 03:20 – The challenges creative giants face. 07:52 – Why the term “giant”? 09:05 – What usually happens when a creative giant goes to large events and conferences.  11:34 – Charlie’s fear of using the term “creative giant” publically.  12:21 – Being able to “stand tall.”   Mentioned In This Episode: Productive Flourishing Theodore Roosevelt Marianne Williamson
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Episode 032: A Life of Storytelling with Mary Trunk
Mary Trunk has many titles to her name including painter, dancer, choreographer, and filmmaker and has been making documentary films for over 20 years. Her first feature length film, The Watershed, screened at over 30 film festivals worldwide and has won numerous awards. She then spent seven years filming her latest documentary Lost in Living. Another short documentary, The Past is in the Present: At Home with Gunther Schuller, co-produced with her husband Paul Sanchez, is also touring the festival circuit around the U.S., and she is currently working on a new hybrid documentary project, which will be a reflection on her past dance career and how that has influenced everything she does. Mary has a new interactive website that she is working on and also teaches film and video at three different colleges in California. In addition to all of that, she is also a mother to one daughter and living in Los Angeles, California.   Key Takeaways: 02:14 – How Mary got started doing the work that she does. 04:16 – The bridge of Mary’s dancing to making documentaries. 08:50 – The relationship between choreography and filmmaking. 13:36 – How Mary stuck with making a documentary that ended up being a seven-year project. 18:11 – What Mary learned from the process of making Lost in Living. 20:49 – Transitioning from Lost in Living to The Past is in the Present. 24:51 – What Mary calls herself with all the different things that she does – businesswoman, filmmaker, etc. 30:48 – How Mary balances all of her work and family priorities. 37:38 – New projects Mary is working on. 40:26 – The most unanticipated challenge Mary is currently facing. 43:20 – We’re all struggling. Everybody has their story. Everybody has their issues.   Mentioned In This Episode: The Watershed Lost in Living The Past is in the Present: At Home with Gunther Schuller This Woman’s Life Art Center College of Design Loyola Marymount University Mount St. Mary’s University UC Santa Cruz My Mother Calls Me San Francisco Art Institute Marjorie Schlossman Slamdance Film Festival  
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Episode 031: Building Your Money Muscle with Joan Sotkin
Joan Sotkin is an author, coach, and businesswoman who helps people understand why they do what they do with their money and how to change their financial behaviors. In the 1980’s Joan built her own mail order business selling crystals and making over $30,000 a month, but her lack of business and financial skills led to her downfall and bankruptcy. This led her down the path of learning everything she could about business and financial management, even attending 12-step programs like Debtors Anonymous and Co-Dependents Anonymous. She eventually went on to start her website prosperityplace.com and write her book Build Your Money Muscles: Nine Simple Exercises for Improving Your Relationship with Money, which won two national awards. Joan joins Charlie on the show today to talk about what she has learned over the years and much more.   Key Takeaways: 01:51 – How Joan got started in her first business. 03:25 – Joan reaching the point where she had to give everything away. 06:39 – Things that led to Joan’s first business going under. 10:13 – Going from being big into the mail order business to learning how to do business using the Internet. 12:24 – Differences between starting a business with the Internet readily available and starting one before the Internet era. 15:49 – How do we connect on a deep level so that we’re connected and we’re not alone? 16:58 – Why it seems like as we becomes more technologically abundant our financial situations get worse. 19:34 – The importance of discipline and conscious living in your spending habits.  22:17 – The identity factor. Why do people who are pretty smart make really stupid decisions? 24:38 – How we know when our identity factor is kicking in. 27:33 – Where all our emotions and feelings attached around money come from and steps we can take to change them.  30:50 – It’s not about the money. It’s about you, your relation to yourself, and your relationship with the world around you. 31:15 – What area in Joan’s own relationship with money she is working on right now. 32:45 – Why it’s easier for Joan to manage debt than it is for her to manage savings. 33:47 – The most unanticipated challenge Joan is currently facing. 37:04 – When you love, accept, acknowledge, and appreciate yourself, you will get paid, and you’re going to be living a rich life.   Mentioned In This Episode: prosperityplace.com Build Your Money Muscles: Nine Simple Exercises for Improving Your Relationship with Money Santa Monica Civic Auditorium Wendy McClelland AOL Amazon Google McKinsey SCORE Facebook The Millionaire Next Door The Secret Uncertainty, Jonathan Fields Debtors Anonymous Co-Dependents Anonymous  
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Episode 030: Advancing Craftsmanship with Breanne Dyck
Breanne Dyck is a strategist, coach, and consultant whose expertise is in distilling information, drawing key insights, and helping her clients achieve light bulb moments. She helps microbusinesses grow their revenues and their impact by applying the principles of adult learning. Her clients include speakers, authors, coaches, consultants, and other microbusiness owners, and she helps them achieve world-class results for their businesses and their customers. She has consulted on many products and courses, live events, and workshops for thought leaders, including New York Times and Amazon bestselling authors. Chris Guillebeau has called her a “course design rock star.” Breanne joins Charlie on the show today to talk about her extensive body of work, share knowledge, and much more.   Key Takeaways: 01:33 – How Breanne got started in her field of work. 06:05 – What made Breanne want to start her own business. 10:02 – When Breanne realized she could make courses and start helping people. 14:19 – Breanne is not a natural risk taker or experimenter. 17:39 – It’s the taking of action that produces learning. 20:55 – Learning in the higher level of mastery, as according to Bloom’s taxonomy. 25:56 – What the hack-first mentality is and the problem with it. 32:56 – Challenges Breanne faced once she started doing course building. 37:19 – Breanne likes to take theoretical knowledge and make it really practical and actionable, but found she was resisting doing that in the beginning. 42:39 – The challenge of being in a microbusiness but not having an infinite amount of time and resources to devote to making it perfect and the “curse of expertise.” 51:59 – Wanting to avoid the perception that we don’t know what we’re doing. 54:29 – The most unanticipated challenge that Breanne is currently facing. 56:40 – The pursuit of craftsmanship, of excellence, of doing amazing work is always a pursuit worth going after.   Mentioned In This Episode: CreativeLive New York Times Chris Guillebeau Amazon Natalie Sisson Tara Gentile World Domination Summit The Small Business Lifecycle Bloom’s taxonomy  Mark Silver “The Curse of Expertise”  
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Episode 029: Building an Inspiring Tomorrow with Valerie Groth
Val Groth is a former school social worker in the inner city schools of Chicago. She holds dual masters degrees in social work and educational leadership, which has helped her work with students in crisis. After her career as a social worker she entered the field of life coaching and works with clients around the world, helping them make positive transformations in their lives. She also hosts her own podcast, Inspirations With Val, which is top ranked on iTunes. It has received over 140,000 downloads per month and has listeners in over 130 countries. In addition to that, Val’s newest project is to build Chicago’s first boarding school for inner city students, The Ryan Banks Academy, set to open for the 2018-2019 school year. Val joins Charlie on the show today to talk about all of that and much more.   Key Takeaways: 02:30 – How Val got started and came to where she is now. 5:22 – Moments that started to pull Val out of her nervous, fearful shell she had as a child. 7:26 – What Val did after she got out of school. 09:47 – How Val got into life coaching. 11:29 – Some major lessons Val learned and challenges she faced when she first started out coaching. 19:00 – What lights Val up about the coaching work she does. 21:57 – We are living in a great day and age where it is very easy for people to create in ways that most help them thrive. 24:29 – How the idea for The Ryan Banks Academy came about. 27:36 – If Val got to a point where she had to choose between life coaching and Ryan Banks Academy, which would she choose and why? 32:23 – Ways people can support The Ryan Banks Academy. 34:20 – Lessons Val has learned since starting The Ryan Banks Academy. 36:09 – The most unanticipated challenge Val is currently facing. 38:08 – A mindset Val has that she feels needs to change. 40:06 – Val feels she is here to inspire people and to bring out the best parts of them.   Mentioned In This Episode: Inspirations with Val Podcast iTunes Ryan Banks Academy World Domination Summit Michael Hyatt ryanbanksacademy.org Kickstarter Eagle Rock Honda Hershey School Hershey The SEED School  
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Episode 028: The Art of Being Unmistakable with Srinivas Rao
Srinivas Rao is a bestselling author and the host and founder of The Unmistakable Creative Podcast where he has interviewed over 500 people in an effort to inspire and encourage his listeners to stand out by being unmistakable. He is also the creator of The Instigator Experience conference and self-published his book The Art of Being Unmistakable. Srini joins Charlie on the show to talk about all of that, as well as offer various other insights into his entrepreneurship journey.   Key Takeaways: 01:04 – How Srinivas got started doing what he does now. 03:56 – How Srinivas figured out how to balance building his business around his love for surfing and just wanting to do that. 07:28 – The need for creative entrepreneurs to have some kind of physical anchor that helps them to do their work. 08:54 – A hard lesson Srinivas had to learn in building his business after going through a rough period. 15:51 – The moment Srinivas realized he was on the wrong path and needed to do something different. 17:27 – Whether Srinivas views himself as a better writer or a better interviewer. 21:44 – Some lessons Srinivas learned when he started writing his first book. 32:28 – Finding a safe place to fail so that you can succeed at the same time. 35:07 – Moments in Srinivas’ career where he knew that was exactly what he wanted to be doing. 38:43 – Srinivas’ advice for how to stick with projects and not kill them too soon. 42:23 – The most unanticipated challenge Srinivas is currently facing. 43:20 – Unmistakable work is about connecting ideas and dots and putting things together in a way that only you could.   Mentioned in This Episode: The Unmistakable Creative Podcast Wall Street Journal The Art of Being Unmistakable BlogCastFM The Skool of Life The Instigator Experience Penguin Portfolio Uncertainty, Jonathan Fields Podcast Movement Huffington Post Gawker Nick Denton Rupert Murdoch Fox The Compass John Bramblitt Tim Ferriss Unmistakable CEO blog Seth Godin Brené Brown Sid Savara Search Engine Journal  
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Episode 027: Leveraging Your Quiet Power with Tara Gentile
Tara Gentile is an author and business strategist, who works with entrepreneurs and helps them design their personal “quiet power strategy” that will tap into their strengths and help them lead themselves where they want to go. She teaches her clients how to find what makes them most effective. Her work has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Design Sponge, and in the bestselling book The $100 Startup. She is also an instructor and speaker, teaching about entrepreneurship, money, and the new economy. She joins Charlie on the show today to talk about her journey and her work and share some of her insights on the entrepreneurial world.    Key Takeaways: 01:40 – How Tara got started doing what she does. 06:28 – The hardest lessons Tara learned during her first years of business. 09:58 – How Tara’s background in religious studies helped and also didn’t help in her early years of business. 13:23 – Figuring out how what you create aligns with people’s worldviews and with their needs and with their values. 14:29 – Entrepreneurs realizing that they’re solving the same problem everyone else is solving, but doing it in a way that’s completely unique to you. 15:42 – What Kick Start Labs is all about. 18:40 – How Tara balances being an introvert and doing the work that she does. 23:51 – How being a control freak can get in the way of being an entrepreneur and navigating a business. 28:37 – Moments in Tara’s career that made her know for sure this was what she wanted to be doing. 34:33 – What Tara is afraid of right now in her work.  37:57 – The most unanticipated challenge Tara is currently facing. 39:30 – Leverage what’s most effective for you.   Mentioned In This Episode: Quiet Power Strategy Fast Company Forbes Design Sponge The New York Times The $100 Startup, Chris Guillebeau CreativeLive Lebanon Valley College Borders Books and Music Kick Start Labs Etsy Pioneer Nation
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Episode 026: Owning Your Own Path with Chris Brogan
Chris Brogan is the CEO of Owner Media Group, a highly sought after professional speaker, coach, consultant, and author. He provides education and tools to help make people’s lives and businesses thrive by teaching them how to own the game they most want to win. He offers events and courses to help get them to that next level of ownership. He is also a New York Times bestselling author of eight books, Forbes has listed Chris as one of the must follow marketing minds of 2014, and his website has been listed as one of the 100 best websites for entrepreneurs. In addition to all that, he is also a husband and father who lives in Massachusetts. Chris joins Charlie on the show today to talk about his impressive body of work as well as much more.   Key Takeaways: 02:39 – How Chris got started. 03:58 – Chris started blogging in the days of dialup Internet 17 years ago. 04:48 – Monetizing blogging. 05:30 – Chris starting out in the area of social media. 06:29 – Chris being labeled as an Internet marketer. 08:26 – A lot of things in marketing and sales are broken, and there are really easy, simplistic ways to fix them. 11:06 – Good and useful content on the Internet. 11:55 – Chris’ books and publishing projects. 15:05 – The hardest lesson Chris learned in his first three years. 18:45 – Chris is the most confident and grounded that he’s ever been in his career right now. 21:00 – The shift from social media expert and blogging to owning/ownership. 29:00 – What Chris is afraid of right now in his career. 29:36 – Chris’ most unanticipated challenge he’s currently facing.   Mentioned In This Episode: Owner Media Group Disney Coke Google GM Microsoft Caldwell Banker Titleist, Scotts Humana Health Cisco Sony USA Richard Branson SUCCESS Magazine Paulo Coelho Harvey Mackay Steven Pressfield Tony Robbins, Internet Money Masters Forbes Gene Simmons, KISS AOL Meerkat Periscope Twitter Frank Kern Plato Jay Baer, Youtility Trust Agents Matt Holt and Shannon Vargo, Wiley Stephen King Minecraft James and Claudia Altucher New Marketing Labs Brian Clark, Copyblogger Media New York Times Donald Trump The Beach Boys, Brian Wilson Macaulay Culkin, Home Alone Joel Comm World Domination Summit Chris Guillebeau Pioneer Nation Online Course Maker Jeff Walker, Product Launch Formula GoDaddy David Siteman Garland Thinkific, Greg Smith Google+
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Episode 025: Art, Abundance, and Entrepreneurship with Cory Huff
Cory Huff is an actor and storyteller who also has a career in Internet marketing. He discovered search engine marketing in social media in 2004 and since then has worked on marketing and software programs for some of the world’s biggest companies. He started his business The Abundant Artist in 2009 as a way of teaching Internet marketing to his artist friends who were asking him for help. He’s helped dozens of artists since, and some of his artist friends and clients have gone on to sell their work for $20,000 or more. In 2014, Cory moved to France for 9 months and was able to grow his online business and advance his goal of helping 1,000 artists create a full time income so they can use their talents to change the world. In November of 2014 he was offered a book deal. He has since moved back to the United States and lives in Portland, Oregon with his wife. Cory joins Charlie on the show to talk about how he teaches artists to be empowered to take charge of their own art business, as well as many other topics.   Key Takeaways: 01:58 – Cory is pretty open about the fact that he grew up in a poor family, and he was the first person in his family to go to college. 05:45 – The Abundant Artist was originally something Cory started as a side project. 07:16 – Shortly after moving to Portland, Cory got a job working on the sales floor for a search engine marketing company but was also a performer and hung out with artists in his spare time. 11:31 – Cory has always done acting on the side. 12:40 – Corey built his business as a way of creating a flexible lifestyle for himself so that he could do the art that he wanted to make. 14:10 – The two biggest problems that most artists have are fear and lack of information. 17:38 – There’s in general not a sharing of knowledge among the fine art community on how to make an art career work. 22:06 – There has never been a better time to be an artist than right now. 32:56 – Cory’s mantra for the last couple of years has been “fail harder.”   Mentioned In This Episode: The Abundant Artist Pacific Northwest College of Art Rhode Island School of Design Patreon Gwenn Seemel The Art of Asking, Amanda Palmer Jonathan Coulton Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, “Thrift Shop” Wieden and Kennedy
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Episode 024: Becoming a Force of Nature with Julie Daley
Julie Daley is a teacher, writer, and coach who works with people around the world in emotional intelligence, conscious embodiment, leadership potential, spontaneous awakening, the sacred feminine, finding one’s purpose, healing the pain of the past, and disconnecting from negative conditioning. She started her journey in 2001 when she became a certified creativity and business teacher at Stanford and received coaching certification from the Coaches Training Institute and the International Federation of Coaches. She also works with those who have lost loved ones in 9/11 as well as those directly affected by the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary. In addition to all of that, Julie enjoys dancing to 5Rhythms, writing prose and poetry, process painting, and spending time with her grandchildren. She joins Charlie on the show to talk about her journey and her work.   Key Takeaways: 02:46 – Julie teaches creativity courses at Stanford as well as writing courses. 03:08 – Julie went to Stanford at age 42 and graduated at age 45 with her bachelor’s degree. 09:37 – The class Julie teaches is really about regaining and reclaiming that trust in ourselves and in the unseen world and in the mystery of life. 10:53 – One of the biggest things that gets in the way of creativity is the voice of judgment. 14:18 – Julie has spent time working with people directly affected by the Sandy Hook shootings and has worked with families of 9/11. 21:44 – Julie now offers a program she teaches where she combines what she’s done at Stanford with what she has experienced and knows about the sacred feminine. 28:38 – Men and women can’t choose to not coexist. We need each other. 32:25 – One of the most important things that we can do right now is to feel. 41:02 – You have exactly what you need to navigate whatever comes your way, and what comes your way is always what you need in the moment.   Mentioned In This Episode: Michael Ray and Rochelle Myers Lucy Pearce Tao Te Ching David Kelley, IDEO The Gender Knot, Allan Johnson Danielle LaPorte Gabrielle Roth, 5Rhythms How to Enter the Creative Unknown Sacred Flesh  Fierce Conversations, Susan Scott
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Episode 023: 27 Steps to Freedom with Wendy McClelland
Wendy McClelland is a lifelong entrepreneur who started a small typing business after her divorce that eventually grew to what The New York Times called one of the best biz sites on the ‘net. She has overcome incredible odds, raising 3 children under 10 while running her growing business and then contracting E. coli, which put her in a body cast from neck to knee, having to completely stop her business and declare bankruptcy, and eventually having to relearn how to walk all together. Having overcome all of that, she was able to start over and chronicles her journey in her new book 27 Steps to Freedom: What Learning to Walk Again Taught Me About Success in Business & Life. Today Wendy provides marketing support and strategy for small to medium businesses. She joins Charlie on the show to discuss all of that and more.   Key Takeaways: 03:04 – Wendy started a small typing business to help make money after getting a divorce when her kids were young. 07:09 – Wendy figured out how to build her own website, and within three weeks The New York Times had picked it as one of the best sites on the Internet. 08:43 – Wendy started out with her online business at a time when all websites were HTML and there was no social media. 10:50 – Wendy says she has had a fearless and brazen personality most of her life and considers that a blessing for her. 12:44 – While Wendy’s business was growing and doing extremely well, she then became sick with E. coli. 18:29 – When you go through a trauma, you’re not going to have that same life again that you had before, yet you still can create an amazing new life for yourself. 26:07 – When you look at all the really amazing things that you can do, to do those things you have to let go of all the little small things that you might want to do instead. So learn to say no. 27:53 – Whatever challenges you’re facing, know that there are people that have walked the path before you who can guide you.   Mentioned In This Episode: 27 Steps to Freedom: What Learning to Walk Again Taught Me About Success in Business & Life The New York Times WordPress Dreamweaver AOL Facebook LinkedIn ryze.com Marie Curie Mother Teresa Nellie McClung The Small Business Lifecycle
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Episode 022: Creating the Automatic Customer with John Warrillow
John Warrillow is a successful entrepreneur who is the founder of The Value Builder System and author of the bestselling book Built to Sell: Creating a Business That Can Thrive Without You, which was recognized by both Fortune and Inc. Magazine as one of the best business books of 2011 and has been translated into 4 languages. His newest book, The Automatic Customer: Creating a Subscription Business in Any Industry, was released in February of 2015. John is a sought after speaker, the creator of the Sellability Score, has started and exited four companies, and has been recognized by B2B Marketing as one of the top business-to-business marketers in the United States. On top of all that, he has done five marathon courses, one Ironman Triathlon, and the L’Etape du Tour bike race, as well as being a husband and the father of two children. John joins Charlie on the show today to discuss his career, his two books, and more.   Key Takeaways: 02:03 – John started out in radio production with the idea that entrepreneurs would want to learn from other entrepreneurs. 06:11 – John sees his career as and entrepreneur as solving one problem at a time and making it a little bit better as he goes. 06:47 – After John sold his last company, he and his family moved to Europe for three years. 09:10 – John was born in England and lived there until he was five. 11:09 – The idea behind Built to Sell is to get out of that trap of not being able to sell and into more of a company that can scale beyond just you personally. 13:41 – One of the biggest reasons people exit their business is disability. 16:43 – John felt he didn’t give enough attention to the idea of recurring revenue in his book Built to Sell. 17:53 – The subscription business is changing dramatically. 21:19 – The subscription economy is the antithesis to the demand economy in a lot of ways. 23:44 – People are willing to pay for good content. 33:49 – John doesn’t see doing PR for his books and products as something he is good at and doesn’t particularly enjoy it.   Mentioned In This Episode: Built to Sell: Creating a Business That Can Thrive Without You The Automatic Customer: Creating a Subscription Business in Any Industry Greig Clark, College Pro Tim Ferriss The E Myth, Michael Gerber Seth Godin Starbucks AMC Theatres Apple Amazon Patreon Uber The Wall Street Journal The New York Times Financial Times The Wood Whisperer Who Moved My Cheese? Gary Vaynerchuk 
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Episode 021: Gathering the People with Sarah Bray
Sarah Bray is a wife and homeschooling mom who has spent the past nine years working with clients as a strategic designer, front-end developer, and nation-builder. She has consulted with over 100 clients on content strategy, product design, marketing strategy, brand and identity development, and online business development. Now she is mostly a writer who is about to finish up her new book Gather the People. She is a huge advocate for nation building as a people-first alternative to traditional marketing and business development and always has a lot of projects going on. She joins Charlie on the show today to talk about what she does and how she got to where she is.   Key Takeaways: 01:33 – Sarah started out as a Web designer. 04:11 – Sarah decided she wanted to care about what she was working on, so she shut down her Web design studio and started her own marketing company. 05:39 – Shortly afterwards, Sarah went to work for a software company in Washington State. 08:35 – Sarah gave herself three weeks to write her book, and she is now on the last week. 10:44 – People confuse risk and uncertainty, and that’s a huge mistake. 17:45 – The trick to wanting to put something out there, a big idea you have, is to reduce the scope of what you’re doing to something that’s really small, and then make that one small thing really well and fantastic. 21:10 – What is really hard about growing as an entrepreneur is competing with your past self all the time. 26:29 – Everything that we make and create has the potential to expand someone else’s world. 31:46 – Sarah also homeschools her kids. 40:21 – There’s conflict in everything that you learn, and sometimes that conflict involves other people.   Mentioned In This Episode: Gather the People Julianne Rhodes Rework Basecamp Twyla Tharp Digg The Chairs Are Where the People Go – Misha Glouberman Lori Pickert
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Episode 020: Life After Tampons with Jennifer Boykin
Jennifer Boykin is the creative visionary behind the midlife reinvention movement “Life After Tampons” who speaks, teaches, and writes about women who rise. She frequently contributes to major Internet sites and blogs regularly for The Huffington Post. Jennifer has experienced many losses in her life, including the death of her only daughter over 20 years ago. She joins Charlie on the show today to discuss dealing with loss, busting through fear, her website community at lifeaftertampons.com, and much more.   Key Takeaways: 01:36 – Jennifer experienced the death of a child over 20 years ago, which led to the start of her movement. 03:40 – Jennifer had always felt that motherhood was always necessary to her happiness but not sufficient so she went back to graduate school. 06:21 – The one rule at Jennifer’s website is they don’t talk about their loved ones and families so they don’t hide behind it. 08:04 – A lot of women spend so much time and energy devoting to family that when they finally have some time, money, and space, they don’t have the first clue about what they want to create. 11:25 – There is nobody talking about what Jennifer talks about on her website, and there are a lot of women who are looking for that sense of community. 12:09 – The biggest challenge for Jennifer has been getting up to speed on technology and staying current with it. 14:59 – Women have a deep yearning for a sense of meaning and purpose in life. 18:52 – Combine your urge for meaning and purpose with what your great loves are. 20:18 – Make it your business to know yourself. 26:39 – Every gain comes with a loss.   Mentioned In This Episode: lifeaftertampons.com Jonathan Fields Pamela Slim
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Episode 019: Find Your Own Success with Jake Ducey
In 2013, when Jake Ducey was 19, he dropped out of college to backpack the world. That then inspired him to write his first book Into the Wind, which he self-published, and it ended up making it to the top 300 on the Amazon bestseller list. He used the money from that book to build an orphanage in Guatemala and has since gained a strong online following and wrote his second book, The Purpose Principles. He has given a TEDx talk and has traveled the nation speaking to over 100 schools and corporations. This summer Jake will be joining The Warped Tour, touring 52 cities in 70 days. He joins Charlie on the show today to talk about his journey and the success he has achieved by following his own path.   Key Takeaways: 00:31 – Jake dropped out of college at the age of 19 to backpack the world. 06:20 – It wasn’t about quitting everything and going to the next country. It was about making a difference. 06:46 – Jake decided that if his first book worked out he would build an orphanage for Guatemala. 07:09 – Jake taught himself how to write, sold his books door to door, and it ended up making the Amazon bestseller list. 09:50 – Jake’s newest book is called The Purpose Principles because he had read The Success Principles by Jack Canfield, who also wrote the forward to the book. 16:28 – Jake will be emceeing The Warped Tour this summer and doing a high school tour of 50 high schools this spring. 21:37 – The Gallup polls for the fall of 2014 showed that 73 percent of Americans said they’re actively disengaged from their jobs. 23:00 – Jake believes success is feeling content and happy within ourselves. 25:08 – Jake is creating a TV show called Seeking Everyday Heroes.   Mentioned In This Episode: Into the Wind The Purpose Principles Jack Canfield, Chicken Soup for the Soul The Warped Tour Brian Gadinsky, American Idol The Success Principles Bronnie Ware John Gray TEDxYouth Ralph Waldo Emerson Amazon Start With Why, Simon Sinek First Things First, Stephen Covey
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Episode 018: She-Factoring the Tech Startup World with Thursday Bram
Thursday is the cofounder of Urgency, Inc., an online marketing agency focused on technical clients. She’s been blogging for over 10 years and has written for a variety of publications. She is a true renaissance woman whose interests include diversity in tech, the use of punctuation, crypto currencies, analytics impact on content strategy, gifs, and open source business models. She is a cofounder of PDX Shelter, a Portland based nonprofit startup, and an organizer at PyLadies PDX. She comes on the show today to talk to Charlie about the issues women face in the tech industry and other things related to tech and business.   Key Takeaways: 1:59 – Thursday grew up in a family of entrepreneurs. 4:00 – Urgency, Inc. was launched at the beginning of this year. 8:01 – A lot of tech companies want to be seen as progressive and modern, but most of those companies are founded by white, straight men who are usually from a middle class to upper class background and don’t think about any experience other than their own. 11:48 – One key starting point in looking at startup companies is looking at how they hire. 15:12 – The number of women who are getting CS degrees is increasing dramatically, but the problem is more a question of keeping women in tech. 16:16 – Investors are less likely to work with women founders, especially women who have families. 21:45 – Being aware of the social issues taking place in companies is the first step to making change. 27:05 – GamerGate started as a posting by a guy who was upset with his ex-girlfriend who was a game developer, and he accused her of sleeping with game journalists to get better reviews and eventually turned into attacks on several women. 32:15 – The same tropes that Anita Sarkeesian has identified in video games are also very visible in other forms of media. It’s a very prevalent thought pattern. 35:40 – PyLadies is a Python user group which for just women. 37:10 – PDX Shelter is a project that uses technology to address homeless problems. 46:08 – Even though all of these problems in the tech business world may seem huge, just taking one step and doing one thing is on the way to solving them.   Mentioned In This Episode: Urgency, Inc. Go Daddy Entrepreneur Magazine PDX Shelter PyLadies PDX Kathy Sierra GamerGate Anita Sarkeesian Startup Weekend Matthew Fountain Firebase
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Episode 017: Life Out of the Box with Jonathon and Quinn
Jonathon Button and Quinn Vandenberg left everything behind at age 25 and moved to Nicaragua. After 6 months of living among the locals, surviving off of just $2.00 a day, and immersing themselves in the culture, Life Out of the Box was formed. They work with local artisans to create unique handmade products that they then sell, and for every product sold they give a child in need school supplies. They have traveled all over Nicaragua giving school supplies to thousands of children and have since developed Life Out of the Box products from Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Morocco, giving thousands of school supplies to children in need.   Key Takeaways: 2:58 – Jonathon and Quinn had been dating for not even a year when the idea of living life out of the box started coming together. Shortly after, they quit their jobs and moved to Nicaragua. 3:46 – Life Out of the Box goes into developing countries, works with the local artisans there to create handmade products, sells them, and for each product sold they give a child in need school supplies. 4:12 – Each product sold has its own unique number on it that the customer can use to go online and look up and see exactly what child they gave school supplies to. 7:00 – They both lived in Nicaragua, completely immersed themselves in the culture, and then went to different schools asking them what they needed most and figured out that basic school supplies were the biggest need. 12:45 – A big part of a social venture is to be able to allow people in a country to create things and use that income to support their own family. 15:59 – They are up to 5,600 handmade bracelets made. 16:53 – Their goal this year is to give to 10,000 children. 19:56 – One thing they’re trying to figure out how they can give to children around the world without them actually being there. 26:13 – Since Jonathon and Quinn are also dating, they struggle with finding a balance between their working life together and their non-working life together. 35:51 – An unanticipated problem they have run into is the large number of people who want to be involved with Life Out of the Box.   Mentioned In This Episode: Life Out of the Box www.lifeoutofthebox.com
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Episode 016: Run the Point with Mike Bruny
Mike Ambassador Bruny’s mission is to help individuals discover their greatness and live it out. His latest project, Brand Inside a Brand, focuses on personal branding for the working professional. He is the author of Move the Crowd: 30 Days of Hip-Hop Affirmations to Change Your Life, as well as a speaker, certified life coach, an alum of the Boston based Leaders of Color Development Program, The Partnership, Inc., and a stay-at-home dad to his 10-month-old son. He talks to Charlie about how he got to where he is today, lessons he’s learned along the way, and how to take action on something you’re passionate about and make it happen.   Key Takeaways: 2:08– Working at Intel is where Mike learned to become a professional speaker and where the idea of Brand Inside a Brand was started. 3:28 – Mike created his own curriculum helping people create a brand inside a brand while at Intel. 5:43 – One challenge you can run into is that companies don’t want you to be your own brand.  7:03 – People who have a good, strong brand of their own are people who you wouldn’t even realize work for a company because they’re so independent. 8:29 – Part of your brand and what Mike teaches is to learn how to be more entrepreneurial, not become an entrepreneur. 11:09 – The idea of working for an employer for the intended length of your working career is obsolete. Most people move on from project to project. 15:21 – It’s about finding a job where you can show up and be the best of yourself, doing the things that you’re interested in, and the things that you’re interested in generating value. 21:35 – Mike sees hip-hop as a language of people. 24:05 – Mike has a vision of getting Seth Godin and Jay-Z on a stage together. 26:00 – Mike’s next project in the works is a community called “No More Reasonable Doubt,” a space where students of color can go to get his work and seek help. 29:27 – Mike organized an event for Charity: Water and helped raise $10,000 for them.   Mentioned In This Episode: Brand Inside a Brand Intel Move the Crowd: 30 Days of Hip-Hop Affirmations to Change Your Life The Partnership, Inc. Ekaterina Walter Justin Levy, Citrix Scott Monty, Ford Matt Cutts, Google Robert Schofield, Microsoft Guy Kawasaki, Apple Ralph Waldo Emerson Jay-Z Charity: Water Chris Brogan Russell Simmons, Do You! Andre Taylor
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Episode 015: Cultivating Creativity During Motherhood with Lucy Pearce
Lucy Pearce is a number one bestseller on Amazon and has written several books on the subject of motherhood and women. Some famous titles include Moon Time, The Rainbow Way, and the Moods of Motherhood. She also has her own publishing company, Womancraft Publishing, that helps empower women and get their voices and books published. Lucy joins Charlie today to talk about how you can unleash your inner creative and not feel guilty about raising children while you're doing it. They also talk about how men can better support creative women and mothers, how to be a productive woman, and more today on Productive Flourishing.    Key Takeaways: 3:10 – Lucy comes from a large family of creatives. 7:00 – When the creative woman can not express herself properly, then her dark side will come out more and more.  10:10 – Multitasking is important at times, but you'd get more things done if you focus on one task at hand.  13:40 – You have to prioritize time for yourself and your creative outlet. Talk to your partner and work with each other's schedules.  15:20 – Have small creative side projects that you can pick up anywhere you are to help maintain your sanity.  19:50 – Between Lucy's 1st and 3rd child, she wrote 4 books, but then again, she doesn't clean her house often or iron. It's all about your personal priorities. What are yours?   23:30 – When reading about productivity tips, it seems like there's more of a male bias to it and it can be hard for many women to relate to.  27:30 – How can the men support the creative woman or the mother? Lucy explains in this segment.  31:20 – A woman's mood and creative energy levels vary depending on her cycle. It's important for men to be aware of that energy and what stage of her cycle she is in.  34:50 – Lucy talks about her book Moon Time, which helps women chart their cycle and their creative energies.  39:10 – Lucy has just taken on a PA and, as a natural lone wolf, she is learning how to delegate her work.  42:40 – In this segment Lucy talks about her most unanticipated challenge so far.  45:10 – Final takeaway? “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” Don't put it off until next year, start now.    Mentioned In This Episode:  LucentWord.com DreamingAloud.net http://thehappywomb.com/ http://www.womancraftpublishing.com/ http://www.amazon.com/Lucy-H-Pearce/e/B00DDTD15G
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Episode 014: Write, Publish, Repeat with Johnny B. Truant
Johnny B. Truant is the co-founder of a publishing company called Sterling and Stone. He has written many fiction books like Unicorn Western, The Beam, Fat Vampire, and more. Johnny and Charlie go way back and have known each other for quite some time. On today's show, Johnny talks about his dreams in wanting to become a fiction writer, self-publishing, and gives great insight on how to make partnerships work.     Key Takeaways: 1:40: - Charlie introduces Johnny.  4:30 – Johnny writes four hours a day and can produce between 6,000 to 8,000 words.  7:30 – Johnny talks a little bit about how he started writing.  11:15 – It took 12 years for Johnny to write his first novel and then he gave up on trying to write fiction.  16:00 – Don't be afraid to call yourself an expert!  20:45 – New technology made it easier for everyone to do their own self-publishing.  25:15 – People think that because they're doing creative work, they can not develop a reliable plan or path, but Charlie says this is not true.  28:00 – Try not to compare yourself to Johnny. Work at your own pace and always try to do a little bit more than you did yesterday.  31:00 – How does Johnny make it work with two other partners? He explains in this segment.  39:20 – You need to respect the other partner involved, communicate, and treat your business relationship almost like a marriage.  43:10 – If you are able to manage your expectations well, you won't end up being disappointed and you can move the business forward with your partners.  46:00 – What's the one key takeaway? There's no substitute for hard work.    Mentioned In This Episode: http://www.amazon.com/Johnny-B.-Truant/e/B007984T5S http://sterlingandstone.net http://selfpublishingpodcast.com/ http://750words.com/
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Episode 013: Traditional Publishing or Self Publishing? with Todd Sattersten
Todd Sattersten loves business books. He helps experts publish books and is the founder of BizBookLab. He is also the co-author of The 100 Best Business Books of All Time. He talks with Charlie today on the show about how he got started, why he decided to help others in the publishing industry, and more.     Key Takeaways: 1:30 – Todd talks about how he got started in the book industry.  5:45 – Due to the economic down turn and the shift in the book industry, Todd decided to take more of an entrepreneurial path instead.  11:40 – Todd talks about paper versus digital formats and how it changed the industry.  20:40 – Traditional publishing or self-publishing? There are benefits to both.  28:35 – There's a fine between writing something you and a very small audience would appreciate and writing something the masses would love.  32:45 – You have to have a clear focus on who your reader will be before you write your book.  37:30 – Field test your book with a few of your critics before your book hits the market.  40:50 – You always have to be promoting your book. Todd created custom book covers for his book to give away on special occasions.  47:30 – Publishing can be a really good thing to add to your business model.  50:15 – The one takeaway? Todd says, “Find the place you can easily see the gratitude that you have for it.”   Mentioned In This Episode: http://toddsattersten.com/
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Episode 012: How to Build Strong Communities with Terry "Starbucker" St. Marie
Terry "Starbucker" St. Marie is a writer, consultant, start up investor, and more. He has recently started an online magazine called BuiltOregon.com, which was crowd funded in December 2014. Terry has had his own business since 2010 and was named top 100 Leadership and Management Experts by Inc. Magazine. He sits down with Charlie to share his story, why he does what he does, how he builds strong communities, and more.    Key Takeaways: 1:30 – Charlie introduces his guest, Terry.  6:00 – Why did Terry leave his 'stable' job for a three-person team?  14:10 – Terry shares tips on how you can work on building better communities.  19:10 – In Charlie's experience people are shy in connecting other people to a higher purpose. Why is that? Terry shares some insight into this.  26:30 – Serve our customers and support each other is the business principle Terry lives by with his employees.  29:10 – One of the things that make us unhappy are setbacks and feeling stalled in our lives.  34:15 – Unanticipated Challenge? Terry doesn't know what to do with his book.  39:10 – Life can be good and hard at the same time.  42:00 – Don't forget to always push forward.    Mentioned In This Episode: BuiltOregon.com http://www.terrystarbucker.com https://twitter.com/starbucker Three Signs of a Miserable Job – Patrick Lencioni 
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Episode 011: Go Beyond Your Fear with Glenda Watson Hyatt
Glenda Watson Hyatt is a blogger, motivational speaker, and more. She has cerebral palsy, which limits some of her function. On the show you may hear the use of additional technology to help her communicate her message to the Productive Flourishing audience. She delivers an inspiring message on the show today and Charlie talks a bit about her life, motivational speaking, and living her life's purpose.    Key Takeaways: 3:11 – Despite Glenda's disabilities, she has lived a very enriched life and won't let it stop her.  5:01 – What are some of Glenda's challenges in being a motivational speaker?  6:30 – Glenda wrote her book to help share her story.  8:40 – Glenda wants people to see her as intelligent and capable.  10:10 – At some point in our lives, we are going to have some sort of disability.  14:15 – Glenda has gone kayaking, horse back riding, and zip lining.  18:20 – How does Glenda over come her fear?  20:00 – Charlie is glad they had this interview unscripted.  23:10 – Glenda leaves the listeners with some final thoughts.    Mentioned In This Episode: I'll Do It Myself by Glenda Watson Hyatt.  http://www.doitmyselfblog.com/ Twitter @GlendaWH
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Episode 010: How To Build Stronger Bonds with Todd Kashdan
Todd Kashdan is a public speaker, psychologist, professor, and author. He has published over 150 peer reviewed journal articles about the meaning of life, strength and development, stress, and more. He is the author of Curious? and, his most recent book, The Upside of Your Dark Side; which he talks a little bit about on Productive Flourishing. Todd shares his wide range of insights with Charlie in this episode as well as talks about some of the challenges he faces, creating stronger bonds, and more.    Key Takeaways: 2:45 – Todd explains how he has two core values and how challenging it is to manage both of them.  7:24 – If you're doing things that aren't pleasurable, but are meaningful, then it's important to have discipline.  11:00 – Everybody has their own set of tools, but it takes time for people to figure out what those tools are and how to use them.  16:20 – Don't always be nice. It sometimes pays to call people out and be a little more narcissistic. 21:50 – Experiencing challenges or discomfort with others creates strong bonds. If you are always nice with certain people, then those bonds aren't tested and you may seek comfort else where.  27:15 – Remember, experiencing anxiety, guilt, and embarrassment, although uncomfortable, these emotions have a purpose. They serve to remind you to be considerate of others.  35:30 – If you are impulsive and say what's on your mind without being a jerk about it, people tend to view you as more open, more kind, and will want to be in relationship with you.  43:50 – We become what we're doing, so what are you doing?  47:30 – Charlie loves Todd's latest book, The Upside of Your Dark Side.  48:20 – Todd talks about what's next for him in this segment.    Mentioned In This Episode: http://toddkashdan.com/ Body of Work by Pam Slim  
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Episode 009: Taming Emotional Obesity with Laura Coe
Laura Coe is an entrepreneur, coach, and writer. She teaches her clients special spiritual techniques to help them live better emotionally stable lives. Laura co-founded Litholink Corporation, a healthcare company that helped over 350,000 patients a month nationally. When she sold Litholink to a Fortune 500 company, she decided it was time to pursue her lifelong passions and help others. She talks to Charlie today on Productive Flourishing about her new book entitled Emotional Obesity, emotional health, corporate America, and more!    Key Takeaways: 2:10 – Laura explains how she transitioned from being a co-founder to an author on emotional health issues.  5:40 – What is emotional obesity? Laura explains.  8:30 – How do we know if we're emotionally obese when there is no emotional scale?  11:50 – When Laura left corporate America she wanted to do something she loved, but she couldn't pursue it just yet because she had lost her inner voice.  17:10 – Laura talks about some of the challenges she had when writing her book.  22:40 – You don't need a PhD to help others or do good work.  26:50 – What kind of exercises can we do to tame the emotional obesity? Laura shares some insight.  30:00 – One of Laura's unanticipated challenges is starting her second business and becoming an entrepreneur again.  32:00 – The one takeaway you need to know? Laura says just start! Step forward even when you're not ready.    Mentioned In This Episode: http://emotionalobesity.com/ Paradise Lost by John Milton
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Episode 008: Making a Healthy Profit AND a Real Difference in Business with Mark Silver
Mark is a fourth-generation entrepreneur who has written 7 different programs and a number of classes for entrepreneurs. He runs a distribution business and is also a paramedic in the San Francisco Bay Area. He sits down with Charlie today to talk about doing what you love, making the money you want, and making a difference in the world.    Key Takeaways: 2:15 – Mark talks about how he started Heart of Business.  7:30 – You can make a profit as well as make a difference in the world.  12:30 – Let go of perfectionism.  18:30 – Most entrepreneurs love what they do, but many people have a hard time connecting with their customers even when they have a sales or marketing background. 24:20 – Mark talks about what excites him the most about his business.  32:00 – Ask yourself this question, do our current methods match our principles?  36:30 – One of Mark's unexpected challenges is expecting something to happen 'right now' with his team when it needs more time to grow. 38:00 – The one takeaway? Mark says be compassionate and gentle with yourself on your journey.    Mentioned In This Episode: http://www.heartofbusiness.com/
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Episode 007: Don't Be An Idea Thief with Jeffrey Davis
Jeffrey Davis is a creativity consultant who helps connect his clients to what really matters. He is a writer and the author of the book entitled The Journey from the Center to the Page. He also has had several essays, articles, and short stories appear in both print and on the web publications all over the world. He sits down with Charlie Gilkey to talk about ideas and how to honor the people who inspire you.     Key Takeaways: 2:15 – We're always swimming in new ideas and sometimes we accidentally take it from someone else.   7:10 – What is a signature idea?  15:07 – Danny Brown pointed out how an advertising agency stole an independent video's premise and ideas without any attribution.  20:10 – Both Jeffery and Charlie talk about the degrees of attribution.  26:55 – People don't want to reference their competitors, but when you do, you are operating from a point of generosity versus a hoarding mentality.  31:10 - Maria Popova actually created a standard on how to properly attribute content creators and she was called an elitist for it.  37:25 – Being generous with your ideas actually helps you with your book marketing.  41:15 – Jeffery read a great Forbes article about how to steal ideas ethnically. Charlie chimes in on this as well.   43:25 – We  have signature ideas that can not be stolen.    Mentioned In This Episode: Where Good Ideas Come From by Steven Johnson Here Comes Everybody by Clay Shirky Ecstasy of Influence by Jonathan Lethem  After the Ecstasy, the Laundry by Jack Kornfield
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Episode 006: Playing Big with Tara Sophia Mohr
Tara Sophia Mohr is an expert on well-being and women's leadership. She has a book entitled, Playing Big: Find Your Voice, Your Mission, Your Message and Tara has been featured on Maria Shiver, Huffington Post, and more. She talks to Charlie today about some of the problems women face in modern times, self-doubt, launching her book with a new born in tow, and resisting our true calling.    Key takeaways: 4:22 – It's hard to be seen as the likeable and good girl when you're trying to challenge the status quo.  9:55 – Play big. Identify what that means to you. Sometimes playing big doesn't have to be big at all.  14:16 – We tend to resist our true calling because of fear.  17:15 – Tara explains about two types of fear in this segment.  22:10 – Women want to be both competent and likeable, but sometimes the two collide with each other and women dumb down their competence to seem more likeable.  29:10 – Both Tara and her husband are in the same type of career field, but Tara thinks it is important to advance each of their careers individually and without using your partner as a crutch. 34:20 – Tara didn't anticipate the amount of opportunities that would open for her as a result of the book and it has been one of her challenges to manage.  37:15 – It's so hard to focus on one thing when we get 20 new ideas a day.    41:22 – The biggest takeaway? Self-doubt is a big problem for women. Tara says to work on taking action when you feel self-doubt.    Mentioned In This Episode:  http://www.taramohr.com http://www.productiveflourishing.com/
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Episode 005: Making Change with Jonathan Fields
Jonathan Fields is an entrepreneur, husband, dad, and an award-winning author. Jonathan is currently focused on the Good Life Project, which is a global movement that helps educate, inspire, connect, and support mission-driven people to achieving more connected and engaged lives. He talks to Charlie today about acting on your thoughts and being the best you can be.    Mentioned In This Episode: http://www.jonathanfields.com/ http://www.productiveflourishing.com/
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Episode 004: Become More Mindful With Susan Piver
Susan Piver is a New York Times bestselling author of 7 books and a Buddhist teacher. She has been practicing Buddhism since 1995 and became authorized to teach Shambhala Buddhist meditation in 2005. Today on Productive Flourishing, Susan talks about The Open Heart Project, an online meditation community, and how she wanted to help people who did not live close to or have access to a meditation teacher.   Mentioned In This Episode: http://susanpiver.com/ 
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Episode 003: Pick Yourself with Seth Godin
Seth Godin is a best selling author and has written 17 books that have sold all over the world. Some of his more famous books include The Dip, Tribes, Purple Cow, and Linchpin. Along with his multiple book successes, he is also the founder of Squidoo.com, a website that allows users to sell products or share their own content. Charlie sits down with Seth live to talk about some vital moments in Seth's career and experiences that you can learn from.    Mentioned In This Episode: http://www.sethgodin.com/sg http://www.ted.com/talks/elizabeth_gilbert_on_genius?language=en
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Episode 002: Overcoming Chronic Fatigue Syndrome with Steve Errey
Steve Errey had been diagnosed with CFS for 5 years before he decided to walk his very first 26 mile marathon. People who suffer from CFS often can not take care of themselves, get out of bed, and even the simplest of physical activity hurts. He created the RunforMe website to bring awareness to his condition and raise funds to help others understand his situation better as well as fund more research for this illness. Many doctors refuse to believe this illness exists and it has been Steve's mission to prove them wrong.      Mentioned In This Episode:  http://www.runfor.me/ https://twitter.com/SteveErrey
Listen: podcast - audio/mpeg

Episode 001: Your Body of Work with Pam Slim
Pamela is an award-winning author, a motivational speaker, and the creator of the blog Escape from Cubicle Nation. She has recently released a new book called Body of Work and talks a little bit about her book, her journey in creating it, and answers some great questions from your host Charlie Gilkey on Productive Flourishing.      Mentioned In This Episode: Body of Work by Pamela Slim Escape from Cubicle Nation by Pamela Slim http://www.escapefromcubiclenation.com/ https://twitter.com/pamslim http://pamelaslim.com/
Listen: podcast - audio/mpeg


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