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The Impact of Caregiving on Relationships – Charlotte Today
<p>Caregiving and Relationships – It’s Complicated Caregiving – University of Washington research shows that March and August are months when divorce filings peak.  But online searches for “divorce” surge earlier in the year. Caregivers are particularly susceptible with 80% percent reporting strain on their relationships. Estimatesof the divorce rate for couples in which one spouse has a serious chronic illness is as high as 75 percent. Can caregivers maintain healthy relationships with their spouses? Yes, with these strategies. First, you have to understand that there are two types of caregiving scenarios taking place. In one scenario, you and I may be taking care of mom and dad and the relationship between husband and wife can suffer. In the second scenario, a spouse can be caring for the other spouse with a chronic condition or dementia. Each has their own issues.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2019/01/21/caregiving-relationships-2/">The Impact of Caregiving on Relationships – Charlotte Today</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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The Impact of Caregiving on Relationships – Charlotte Today
<p>Caregiving and Relationships – It’s Complicated University of Washington research shows that March and August are months when divorce filings peak.  But online searches for “divorce” surge earlier in the year. Caregivers are particularly susceptible with 80% percent reporting strain on their relationships. Estimatesof the divorce rate for couples in which one spouse has a serious chronic illness is as high as 75 percent. Can caregivers maintain healthy relationships with their spouses? Yes, with these strategies. First, you have to understand that there are two types of caregiving scenarios taking place. In one scenario, you and I may be taking care of mom and dad and the relationship between husband and wife can suffer. In the second scenario, a spouse can be caring for the other spouse with a chronic condition or dementia. Each has their own issues.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2019/01/21/caregiving-relationships/">The Impact of Caregiving on Relationships – Charlotte Today</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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The Importance of New Year’s Resolutions for Seniors – Charlotte Today
<p>The Importance of New Year’s Resolutions for Seniors – Charlotte Today NEW YEAR’S Resolutions are just for the young, right? Not necessarily. They actually has practical value for older people and can impact your overall health positively. Provide Purpose If nothing else, they provide us with goals and purpose in our lives. Rush University has conducted studies that show people who view life with a sense of purpose are two to four times less likely to develop Alzheimer’s. Purpose gives you discipline. Another Rush study notes that self-disciplined, highly organized people are less susceptible to Alzheimer’s. And, a study in Journal of the American Medical Association showed that older adults with a solid sense of purpose tend to retain strong hand grips and walking speeds – key indicators of how rapidly people are aging. Watch my segment on the Charlotte Today program.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2019/01/08/resolutions-seniors-2/">The Importance of New Year’s Resolutions for Seniors – Charlotte Today</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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The Importance of New Year’s Resolutions for Seniors – Charlotte Today
<p>The Importance of New Year’s Resolutions for Seniors – Charlotte Today NEW YEAR’S Resolutions are just for the young, right? Not necessarily. They actually has practical value for older people and can impact your overall health positively. Provide Purpose If nothing else, they provide us with goals and purpose in our lives. Rush University has conducted studies that show people who view life with a sense of purpose are two to four times less likely to develop Alzheimer’s. Purpose gives you discipline. Another Rush study notes that self-disciplined, highly organized people are less susceptible to Alzheimer’s. And, a study in Journal of the American Medical Association showed that older adults with a solid sense of purpose tend to retain strong hand grips and walking speeds – key indicators of how rapidly people are aging. Listen to my segment on the Charlotte Today program.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2019/01/08/resolutions-seniors/">The Importance of New Year’s Resolutions for Seniors – Charlotte Today</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Lightheaded When Standing? Dementia Risk Later? Smilecast 189
<p>Feel Lightheaded when Standing Up? You May Have a Greater Dementia Risk (Editor’s Note: I am only reporting on the study. It does not imply my endorsement or belief in it) People who feel faint, dizzy or lightheaded when standing up may be experiencing a sudden drop in blood pressure called orthostatic hypotension. Now a new study says middle-aged people who experience such a drop may have greater dementia risk and risk of stroke decades later. The study is published in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2018/12/28/dementia-risk-2/">Lightheaded When Standing? Dementia Risk Later? Smilecast 189</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Senior Driver – Tips to be Safe on the Road – Smilecast 188
<p>The Senior Driver: Tips to Be Safer on the Road Promoting positive aging begins with understanding a senior’s daily life. If a senior is still living independently, chances are that he or she drives a car on a regular basis. Unfortunately, the risk for getting into a car accident as a senior driver is higher than other age groups. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that drivers aged 65 and up accounted for nearly 12.5% of the drivers who were involved in fatal crashes in the U.S. last year. If you are a caregiver or senior driver, it is important to recognize how aging affects motor skills and how seniors can drive more safely.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2018/12/24/senior-driver-smilecast-188/">Senior Driver – Tips to be Safe on the Road – Smilecast 188</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Diabetes and Parkinson’s Link? Smilecast 187
<p>Diabetes and Parkinson’s Disease Link Possible People with type 2 diabetes may have an increased risk of having a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease later in life, according to a large study published in the online issue of Neurology®. In addition, the risk between diabetes and Parkinson’s may be higher for younger people and those with complications from the disease.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2018/12/21/diabetesandparkinsons-2/">Diabetes and Parkinson’s Link? Smilecast 187</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Exercise and Thinking Skills – How Much is Enough? Smilecast 186
<p>How Much Exercise Is Needed to Help Improve Thinking Skills? We know that exercise may help improve thinking skills. But how much exercise? And for how long? To find the answers, researchers reviewed all of the studies where older adults were asked to exercise for at least four weeks and their tests of thinking and memory skills were compared to those of people who did not start a new exercise routine. The review is published in the online issue of Neurology® Clinical Practice. They found that people who exercised an average of at least 52 hours over about six months for about an hour each session may improve their thinking skills. In contrast, people who exercised for an average of 34 hours over the same time period did not show any improvement in their thinking skills.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2018/12/17/exercise-thinking-skills-3/">Exercise and Thinking Skills – How Much is Enough? Smilecast 186</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Boosting Your Interpersonal Skills as You Age – Smilecast 185
<p>Boosting Your Interpersonal Skills as You Age Having solid interpersonal skills is vital throughout life, even as you age. As we grow older we are faced with an increasing number of obstacles that hinder effective communication. Communication disorders can affect people of all ages but are, sadly, more prevalent among seniors and may be categorized by a stable, recovering or degenerative course. Communication changes are frequently reported by older people. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) reports on a survey of 12,000 participants over the age of 65, where more than 42% reported hearing problems, 26% experienced difficulty writing and 7% struggled to use a phone. Well-developed interpersonal communication skills can counter communication disorders significantly, highlighting the importance of acquiring and maintaining such skills throughout one’s life. Apart from focusing on strengthening interpersonal skills for the benefit of others it is imperative to also make the effort to invest in your own personal well-being. Finding a balance between the two will provide you with all the skills required to effectively communicate well into your golden years.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2018/12/14/boosting-interpersonal-skills-2/">Boosting Your Interpersonal Skills as You Age – Smilecast 185</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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A Salad a Day Boosts Memory / Makes You 11 Years Younger! Smilecast 184
<p>Will a Salad a Day Keep Memory Problems Away? Eating about one serving per day of green, leafy vegetables may be linked to a slower rate of brain aging, according to a study published in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.So in essence, a salad a day may be beneficial to brain health. The study found that people who ate at least one serving of green, leafy vegetables a day had a slower rate of decline on tests of memory and thinking skills than people who never or rarely ate these vegetables. The difference between the two groups was the equivalent of being 11 years younger in age, according to study author Martha Clare Morris, ScD, of Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.  </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2018/12/10/salad-per-day-boosts-memory-3/">A Salad a Day Boosts Memory / Makes You 11 Years Younger! Smilecast 184</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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