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Alcohol and Alzheimer’s – Drink Responsibly – Smilecast 67
<p>Alcohol and Alzheimer’s – OK to Drink But Like Everything in Moderation Leave it to German researchers to conduct a study where they found that elderly adults who consume about two alcoholic beverages per day are at a significantly lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and dementia than non-drinkers. Alcohol and Alzheimer’s – who knew? Researchers said that study subjects were 30% less likely to develop dementia, and 40% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease. The study sampled 3,200 German seniors aged 75 and older. At the start of the study, none of the participants had dementia. Over the course of three years, participants were occasionally interviewed about their drinking habits and evaluated for signs of dementia. During that time, 217 participants were diagnosed with some form of dementia. Researchers surmised that older men and women who drink alcohol sensibly in old age also have a healthier lifestyle in terms of physical, dietary, and mental perspectives. The study was published in the journal Age and Aging. So is it really the drinking or the fact that responsible adults take better care of themselves. I’m going with the drinking!!!!</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/10/16/alcohol-and-alzheimers/">Alcohol and Alzheimer’s – Drink Responsibly – Smilecast 67</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Fun and Different Activities for Seniors – Charlotte Today – Smilecast 66
<p>Fun and Different Activities for Seniors – Charlotte Today Seeking out engaging and fun activities for seniors? Forget the novelties of gardening and golfing, and try a little something new with these fun ideas! This segment is from my appearance on the Charlotte Today Show. We discussed different categories of activities – exercise, activities that stimulate creativity, those that engage people socially, those that have a charity component, and finally those that contribute to lifelong learning. Take a look and try some for yourself.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/10/13/fun-different-activities-seniors-2/">Fun and Different Activities for Seniors – Charlotte Today – Smilecast 66</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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What We Can All Learn About Living in the Present – Smilecast 65
<p>What We Can All Learn About Living in the Present My good friend Sandy Halperin, who has early onset Alzheimer’s was recently honored along with Sanjay Gupta, M.D. with the 2016 Proxmire Award, which recognizes national figures who have “demonstrated leadership and positively impacted public awareness around Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.” A couple weeks before he accepted the award we had a 35 minute Skype call. In it he expressed concern about what he was going to say. Certainly honored by the award, he knew he needed to be both gracious but also make a statement, while he still could, about how much more was needed to be done in the battle against the disease. Sandy lives in what he calls “The Precious Present.” It’s a book and a way of life for many with dementia, including Alzheimer’s. But it could be a way of life for all of us if we grasp the nugget of what this tiny book is about. Living in the present. It’s all we got. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/10/09/living-present/">What We Can All Learn About Living in the Present – Smilecast 65</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Gastric Bypass Surgery Can Lead to Alcohol Abuse – Smilecast 64
<p>Gastric Bypass Surgery Can Lead to Alcohol Abuse  Patients who had gastric bypass surgery faced double the risk for excessive drinking, according to a study released by in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The surgery shrinks the stomach’s size and attaches it to a lower portion of the intestine. That limits food intake and the body’s ability to absorb calories. Researchers believe it also changes how the body digests and metabolizes alcohol. Researchers asked nearly 2,000 women and men who had various kinds of obesity surgery at 10 centers nationwide about their drinking habits one year before their operations, versus one and two years afterward. Most didn’t drink excessively before or after surgery, and increases in drinking didn’t occur until two years post-surgery.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/10/06/gastric-bypass-surgery/">Gastric Bypass Surgery Can Lead to Alcohol Abuse – Smilecast 64</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Alcohol and Older Adults What You Don’t Know – Smilecast 63
<p>Alcohol and Older Adults What You Don’t Know   Alcohol and Older Adults – What You Don’t Know You can become more sensitive to drinking as you get older. The same amount consumed may have a greater effect on an older person than on someone who is younger. Heavy drinking can make some health problems worse. Common health problems that can be made worse include stroke, high blood pressure, memory loss, and mood disorders. Some medicines don’t mix. Many prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal remedies can be dangerous or even deadly when mixed with alcohol. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Get the facts about older adults from the National Institute on Aging.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/10/02/alcohol-older-adults-dont-know/">Alcohol and Older Adults What You Don’t Know – Smilecast 63</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Older People with Positive Outlook on Aging Recover Better – Smilecast 62
<p>Older People with Positive Outlook on Aging More Likely to Recover from Disability   Older people who embrace positive stereotypes about aging are more likely than those who hold negative stereotypes to recover after suffering from disability, a study by the Yale School of Public Health has found.A positive outlook goes a long way in healing. Lead researcher Becca R. Levy and Yale colleagues showed that, of two groups with differing views of aging, the individuals in the positive age stereotype group were 44 percent more likely to recover from a severe disability. Participants included 598 individuals who were at least 70 years old and free of disability at the start of the study. They were selected from a health plan in greater New Haven, Connecticut. The association between positive age stereotypes and recovery from disability in older persons has not been previously studied. The findings suggest that interventions to promote positive age stereotypes could extend independent living later in life.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/09/29/older-people-positive-outlook-aging-recover-better-smilecast-62/">Older People with Positive Outlook on Aging Recover Better – Smilecast 62</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>


Prepare Your Home for Aging in Place – Smilecast 61
<p>Prepare Your Home for Aging in Place  Here are a few simple improvements you can make to remain the king and queen of your castle. Prepare now for aging in place not in a nursing home. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines aging in place as “the ability to live in one’s own home and community safely, independently, and comfortably, regardless of age, income, or ability level. Most adults would prefer to age in place—that is, remain in their home of choice as long as possible. In fact, 90 percent of adults over the age of 65 report that they would prefer to stay in their current residence as they age.[5] One-third of American households are home to one or more residents 60 years of age or older.[6]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/09/25/prepare-home-aging-place-smilecast-61/">Prepare Your Home for Aging in Place – Smilecast 61</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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WHY SHOULD YOU CONSIDER TAKING A Caregiver Cruise-Smilecast 60
<p>Consider a Caregiver Cruise There are 66 million family caregivers in the U.S. alone; 70% are female and 25% are Millennials. They suffer worsened health than non-caregivers and 40-60% report symptoms of depression. Some caregivers, like my sister, pre-decease the ones for whom they care. Recently, my local church, through funding through my Rotary chapter, was given a sizeable grant to support their Monday respite program. To say they are bursting at the seams is an understatement. Family caregivers love the time to themselves while their loved ones have time to participate in activities. But many of the caregivers stay and participate themselves. They love spending time with their loved one in a fun setting. A caregiver cruise multiplies this by 10 – or maybe seven depending on how many days you choose! Let’s look at some reasons you might consider a cruise/conference.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/09/22/caregiver-cruise-4/">WHY SHOULD YOU CONSIDER TAKING A Caregiver Cruise-Smilecast 60</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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Those With Advance Directives More Likely Seek Interventions-Smilecast 59
<p>People Who Fill Out Advance Directives More Likely to Seek Interventions  A study finds that nearly a third of people who fill out advance directives — a person’s wishes for end-of-life care — request medical interventions. The research from DePaul University was published by Craig M. Klugman, hair of DePaul’s Department of Health Sciences, and co-author Nicole M. Tolwin. No surprise, younger people requested interventions such as respiratory support or antibiotics more frequently than people over the age of 50. Researchers also discovered that many people may not be discussing their wishes with loved ones after an advance directives is completed. That is not so good because you really should be discussing your wishes with others, especially the person with medical power of attorney who needs to know in your spoken words exactly what you mean in your written advance directive.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/09/18/advance-directives-seek-interventions/">Those With Advance Directives More Likely Seek Interventions-Smilecast 59</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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When Advance Directive in Place Dying More Peaceful – Smilecast 58
<p>Advance Directive in Place – Dying More Peaceful A Belgian study suggests that when a person has an advanced directive in place, dying is more peaceful. Advance care planning is considered a central component of good quality palliative care and especially relevant for people who lose the capacity to make decisions at the end of life. Investigators set out to investigate to what extent (1) advance care planning in the form of written advance patient directives and verbal communication with patient and/or relatives about future care and (2) the existence of written advance general practitioner orders were related to the quality of dying of nursing home residents with dementia. Researchers concluded that for nursing home residents with dementia there is a strong association between having a written advance directive and quality of dying. Where wishes are written, relatives report lower levels of emotional distress at the end of life.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com/2017/09/15/advance-directive-place-dying-peaceful-smilecast-58/">When Advance Directive in Place Dying More Peaceful – Smilecast 58</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.theagingexperience.com">The Aging Experience</a>.</p>
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