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Dann Berg is here to help you leave your novice-dom behind, helping you build the business and life you want. Each week, Dann interviews entrepreneurs, journalists, developers, and other interesting people, exploring how they accomplish their goals.

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Podcast Episode's:
034 : The UX of time travel with SFCD Agency
It's a seemingly simple problem — tell the user what time it is in different countries around the world — with an endless number of solutions. There are a few questions you need to ask yourself before even touching pencil to paper: What's the best way for humans to manipulate time? And really, what is time? SFCD Agency took a break from client work to put out its first mobile application: Miranda. It's a time zone converter with an elegant and unique user interface. In this episode, Yasser, the Head of Product and Strategy, and Dmitry, the Creative Director, share their experience making Miranda. It's an inside look at the app creation process within an agency, where ideas are brainstormed and workshopped into their final form. Here's what we chat about: Getting started with agency work How many projects that their agency works on at a single time How much apps usually cost, and why people are often surprised by that Why an agency is like a sherpa How they came up with the idea for Miranda How Miranda started as a design challenge to all the designers in the agency Why SFCD created a version of the app that can be touched as soon as possible How long it took to make Miranda The biggest unexpected challenge with creating Miranda How agency work differs from internal projects Links mentioned in this show include: Miranda (iOS) How much does it cost to make an app? InVision for clickable prototypes Ask a developer Do you have questions about building apps? Now you can submit your question to Novice No Longer podcast and have it answered live on air! Record a question using your computer and it may be answered by some of the top developers in the App Store. Submit a question now Did you enjoy this episode? Thank the SFCD Agency on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let them know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter (you can edit the tweet first): Click here to thank the SFCD Agency on Twitter! Comments? How do you currently keep track of different time zones? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. Thanks again for listening!
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033 : Bestselling indie games with A Dark Room’s Amir Rajan
awake. head throbbing. vision blurry. So begins one of the most unique games to ever hit the App Store. What follows is an experience that takes the player through a dystopian world that starts with the simple gathering of wood and slowly grows in scope to places you'd never expect. Amir Rajan discovered the original web-based A Dark Room (developed by Michael Townsend) on Hacker News and knew it needed to be on mobile. He negotiated the rights to create the iOS app and began his journey into RubyMotion and Objective-C development. He shares how he promoted his app and what it felt like to have a meteoric rise to the top of the App Store. You should listen to this episode if you've ever wondered what it takes to have a best-selling app. NOTE: It's highly recommend that you finish A Dark Room before listening to this episode! Here's what we chat about: What drew Amir to the original game by Michael Townsend Why Amir used RubyMotion instead of Objective-C Amir's experience discovering the original web-based A Dark Room Why Amir couldn't just copy code from the web version to his mobile version Negotiating the exclusive rights to the mobile version of the app The benefits of Amir's development log Why Amir decided to share every detail about the development process How Amir chose the original price of $1.99 Why Amir recommends starting your app at a high price What happened when Amir learned that A Dark Room 1.0 didn't work on the iPhone 5S Amir's experience with promo codes How Amir used Twitter to get press for A Dark Room How the UK reception was way different from the US Releasing a new version of the app to hide old reviews What Amir has planned for the future of A Dark Room Links mentioned in this show include: The original A Dark Room A Dark Room for iOS A Dark Room for iOS development logs r/apphookup r/incremental_games The Ensign: A Dark Room prequel Ask a developer Do you have questions about building apps? Now you can submit your question to Novice No Longer podcast and have it answered live on air! Record a question using your computer and it may be answered by some of the top developers in the App Store. Submit a question now Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Amir on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Amir know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter (you can edit the tweet first): Click here to thank Amir on Twitter! Comments? Do you find indie games easier or harder to sell than utilities? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. Thanks again for listening!
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032 : Building an app business not just a product with Dan Counsell
What is one of the biggest mistakes made by aspiring app entrepreneurs? Confusing a product with a business. If you build and release an app, you're selling a product. What happens when sales dwindle? Do you have a plan for sustainable revenue? Dan Counsell is the founder of Realmac Software, creators of applications such as RapidWeaver, Ember, and Clear. He's been in the software business for a while now, and has learned some extremely valuable lessons along the way. In this episode, he shares the story of his very first piece of software, and his shock when people started sending him money for it. He also walks me through the design, development, and launch of his most recent app, Clear (which I personally use every single day). The app is available for both iOS and an OS X, and he talks about why all developers should be targeting both App Stores. This episode is about creating an app business, not just a product. Here's what we chat about: How Dan first transitioned from web development to software development The surprising influx of money that made Dan realize that people will pay for software The reason Dan believes that social apps are harder to sell than utilities Why Dan decided to make a to-do list application when there were already hundreds in the App Store Dan's very first step once he has an idea for a new app The challenges of creating a gesture-based interface When Dan started prepping for the launch of Clear How to tell journalists that you're working on a new app Why email lists are a vital part of a successful launch How Dan used beta testing to capture the attention of the press Why Dan wasn't worried that journalists were going to leak details about Clear early Growing an iOS app into a cross-device utility with a Mac app Making more money by losing sales but charging more for your app Why Dan suggests building apps for the Mac, and not just mobile Links mentioned in this show include: Clear (App Store) Realmac Software Paid, Paymium or Freemium by Dan Councell POP Prototyping on Paper DanCounsell.com Ask a developer Do you have questions about building apps? Now you can submit your question to Novice No Longer podcast and have it answered live on air! Record a question using your computer and it may be answered by some of the top developers in the App Store. Submit a question now Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Dan on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Dan know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter (you can edit the tweet first): Click here to thank Dan on Twitter! Comments? Would your app work in the OS X App Store? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. Thanks again for listening!
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031 : How to raise money to fund your app with Hunter Gray
In 2011, Hunter Gray turned his app idea into the capital needed in order to get the product built. In this episode of the podcast, he shares exactly how he pitched his idea for the original version of Klutch to investors, and how the venture capital world has changed in just a few short years. Not everyone will be able to turn their ideas into cash, but Hunter explains the methods that worked for him and talks about what might work for you, too. There's so much discussion of bootstrapping today (and for good reason, it works), but it's nice to have a different perspective on building an app business. If you're dying to get your app idea in front of investors, Hunter explains exactly what you need to do to make that interaction as successful as possible. Here's what we chat about: Narrowing down your idea into individual "points of friction" Why scheduling on mobile is particularly difficult and how Hunter turned it into opportunity The presentation that Hunter gave that attracted investors before he had a product What happens when you're 70 percent done with development and realize you're short on investor money What it takes to build a killer team that attracts investors Angel investors versus venture capital firms How a Series A funding round today is more like a Series B round of yesteryear When Hunter realized that he needed to scale back the calendar in a calendar-based scheduling app How planning get togethers and events have changed now that everyone has mobile phones Where the name "klutch" came from What made Hunter give up all the branding he had done for Atlas to rename it Klutch How Klutch got articles in the NY Times and Washington Post (among others) and featured in the App Store NEW: Hunter answers one of your questions! Ask your own question here. Hunter explains exactly how to pitch your app to investors if you want to raise money How investors are trading their money for your time Links mentioned in this show include: Klutch (iOS) GetKlutch.com NEW: Ask a developer Do you have questions about building apps? Now you can submit your question to Novice No Longer podcast and have it answered live on air! Record a question using your computer and it may be answered by some of the top developers in the App Store. Submit a question now Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Hunter on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Hunter know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter (you can edit the tweet first): Click here to thank Hunter on Twitter! Comments? Are you trying to get your app in front of investors? Why? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. Thanks again for listening!
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030 : A carefully crafted app launch with Jeremy Olson
It's easy to look at somebody like Jeremy Olson and think, "wow, this guy came out of nowhere and just dominated the app scene!" His created his first app, Grades, while still in college, and it won him Apple's prestigious Design Award in 2011. From there, he founded Tapity, an app development company that just launched its newest app Hours. He's also the co-author of the popular App Design Handbook. But creating a beautiful product is only one step in the process of releasing successful apps. In this interview, Jeremy takes me back to the beginning, and shares how he used a journal-like blog to make industry connections and build an audience before he even knew what he was doing. He also talks about turning app releases into launch events, which explains why Hours was covered by almost every major tech news website. With over a million apps in the App Store, app success really is all about the launch. Jeremy shares exactly how he does it. Here's what we chat about: The failures Jeremy faced before his public success Jeremy's thoughts on Apple's new programming language Swift Where the inspiration for Jeremy's first app Grades came from Jeremy's original challenges with Objective-C and how he finally broke through Why Jeremy isn't afraid of having any of his ideas stolen Making interactions not just usable, but "delightful" The "marketing" work that Jeremy did before he launched his first app What "launch day" looks like at Tapity The power of an email list Why teaching is so important, especially in the tech industry Jeremy's advice for people with an idea for an app but no app experience Links mentioned in this show include: Apps: Grades, Languages, Hours Tapity How Hours became a top grossing app App Design Handbook Jeremy's upcoming App Making Video Course Ready to create your own website? Here's my free online course NEW: Ask a developer Do you have questions about building apps? Now you can submit your question to Novice No Longer podcast and have it answered live on air! Record a question using your computer and it could be answered by some of the top developers in the App Store. Submit a question now Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Jeremy on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Jeremy know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter (you can edit the tweet first): Click here to thank Jeremy on Twitter! Comments? What are you doing to build your email list? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. Thanks again for listening!
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029 : Novice No Longer goes back to apps
I was still working retail when I truly felt what it was like to be a novice. I was just starting the second chapter of a book on Objective-C (after two other books and a video course couldn't help me) and the words were beginning to sound like gibberish. I just couldn't make it any farther in my journey to learn programming. Each of these resources contained a small disclaimer in the intro: some prior programming experience required. At that point in my life, I had done a little HTML and CSS, and figured that experience was a solid foundation for learning more advanced programming with the right guidance. But nothing made sense. And it wasn't a matter Googling terms I didn't understand — I didn't even know what I should be Googling or how to determine a helpful answer. Everything I read went over my head, and it was impossible to sort the helpful information from the advanced stuff that I really wasn't ready for yet. That's when I discovered Programming in Objective-C by Stephen Kochan. It taught a language I was interested in learning, and didn't require any prior programming experience. I didn't need to learn C before tackling Objective-C. The book simply started from the beginning. It was for novices like me. Programming teaches you a new way to think. Yet even after finishing that book, I still remembered what it felt like to be in the dark. When I talked to other people interested in learning to code, I saw them in the same place I was years before...and I wanted to help. That's why I launched Novice No Longer, to help people build apps even if they had no prior programming experience. I launched the podcast in order to further this goal. Over time, the podcast drifted away from this vision, and became more a business/entrepreneur/lifestyle design podcast. It's been amazing, and I've had some amazing guests on the show, but it's time to get back to the original vision. I'm taking a break from the podcast for a short while for the revamp. When we return, we're going to have some top app developers on the show, like Jeremy from Tapity and Dan Councell from Realmac Software. Is there someone you'd like to see on the show? Let me know. I'm also introducing a brand new segment to the show, called Ask a Developer. Each week, I'm going to play a question asked by you, the listener, and my guest and I will do our best to provide an answer. It's a chance to get your biggest questions answered by the masters. Here's what's changing: We've got a fancy new up-beat intro! The focus of the podcast is being brought back to mobile apps There's an awesome new segment: Ask a Developer Links mentioned in this show include: Programming in Objective-C by Stephen Kochan New Segment: Ask a Developer! We're launching a brand new segment to help answer your biggest questions. Head on over to the Ask a Developer page and record any question that you have about making apps. Each week, I'm going to play your questions live on air, allowing my guest and myself to answer as best as we can. This new segment can't work without you (yes, you reading this right now). Please go to the Ask a Developer page and ask a question! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. Thanks again for listening!
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028 : Better products through storytelling with Donna Lichaw
Storytelling has been a part of the human experience since the beginning of history (one of the reasons that we even have history). Our brains are wired to respond to stories — whether it's an urban legend told to us around a campfire as a child, or the tale of an obese man who lost weight with an all-Subway diet. Donna Lichaw knows a thing or two about the importance of narrative, having studied film for both her undergrad and graduate degrees. She now uses the power of the narrative arc to build compelling products that engage the user by leading them through a carefully crafted experience. She's worked with companies such as Seamless, Citi, Bloomberg, and Atlantic Records, diving into the user experience and building products that stick. This episode is amazing. My favorite part is when she applies the narrative arc to an app I'm working on, and we get to see the entire process in action (starts at 52:45). Here's what we chat about: Donna's film studies background and how it's colored everything else in her life Behind the scenes of a documentary film, and how it's like the discovery process for building products How teaching shows you how much you really know How Donna has adjusted to working with a personal assistant How to make sure that you're getting quality work from your assistant Why everything needs a build-measure-learn cycle The different forms that a Minimum Viable Product can take The one question you should be asking yourself if you have an idea for a new app Links mentioned in this show include: Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath Chris Ducker Donna's list of conferences Lanyrd Great North Electric Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Donna on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Donna know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter (you can edit the tweet first): Click here to thank Donna on Twitter! Comments? What is your app's narrative arc? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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027 : Growth hacking Guides.co with Franco Varriano
The growth tactics you use when your company is just starting out are different from when the company is a few months old. They change even more as the company grows to handle more and more users. Applying the wrong growth tactics, at the wrong times, can be just as bad as not acting at all. Today, I have Franco Varriano of Guides.co on the show. He shares how Guides.co started as a company called Startup Plays, and the exact moment when it grew into its current form. As the company gained momentum, Franco has been there to guide its progress — fostering communities of both guide authors and users. He shares some of his insights on this week's episode. Even if you just have an idea, Franco has insights about how to collect the most valuable feedback. This is a great episode for entrepreneurs of all levels. Here's what we chat about: How Franco became a "growth hacker" The "innovative hub" where Franco got his start The problems that inspired Startup Plays, which eventually became Guides.co The one early-user communication tool that's so often forgotten The moment when Startup Plays became Guides.co The interactive component that makes Guides.co different from other online how-tos How to get feedback when all you have is an idea Getting those very first users Using hired help to test your website against different use cases What is "digital marketing" and how it's different for individuals and businesses Links mentioned in this show include: Blogging your way to a writing career Hacker News Elance Odesk Amazon Mechanical Turk Beta List Product Hunt GrowthHackers.com GrowthHacker.tv Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Franco on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Franco know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter (you can edit the tweet first): Click here to thank Franco on Twitter! Comments? Have you used any tricks to grow your product's audience? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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026 : How to hire a coder without learning code
You have an idea for an app. Maybe you've even made some sketches or you have the full wireframes done. Now it's time to hire a developer...but you don't have any idea where to begin. In this episode of the podcast, I share exactly what you need to do to get an app in the app store. We start with your mockups then move into finding a developer, communicating with that developer, and submitting your app. This is the entire process. If you're ready to finally get that app in the app store, listen in. Here's what I talk about: The real goal of mockups and wireframes My method for finding a developer that doesn't use Elance or Odesk Why you should never spend money on an NDA (but send one anyway) Why your developer won't steal your idea How to tell if you're getting quality code What you need to know about agile development Methods for submitting your app once it's complete The mysterious app review process Links mentioned in this show include: Codecanyon Docracy Did you enjoy this episode? Thank me by sharing it on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let me know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter (you can edit the tweet first): Click here to thank me on Twitter! Comments? Have you worked with a freelance developer? Let me know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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025 : From Crash Bandicoot to a smarter inbox with Dave Baggett
How many unread emails do you have in your inbox? If you went all the way back to the very oldest unread email, do you think you'd actually need it? If not, why is it still there? When are you going to do something about it? Email itself first came on the scene circa 1993, alongside Windows NT 3.1 and massive brick phones. Since then, our computers have evolved substantially — and just look at our smartphones — but our email inboxes remain mostly just a big dumb bucket. Dave Baggett is using machine learning to bring your inbox up to speed. He's the founder of Arcode, creator of Inky email client (iOS, OS X). Dave shares the interesting story of how Inky came to be, starting with working on the first two Crash Bandicoot games and then joining a travel startup that would end up taking over the industry (and eventually get acquired by Google). He's got an interesting story and a fresh take on email. It'll make you think about your own projects differently. Here's what we chat about: How Dave dropped out of MIT (he was working on his Ph. D!) to develop the first Crash Bandicoot came How Dave transitioned from the gaming industry to the travel industry What it's like to have the Department of Justice review your acquisition for a full year Behind the scenes of Dave founding Arcode and creating Inky Inky's false minimum viable product, and what they learned from the early feedback How Dave's experience coding games helped him with his future projects Why Dave prefers low-level languages, and how he still gets in there sometimes even today How ITA Software grew, in both vision and scope How ITA Software took advantage of being on the cusp of a huge revolution in travel booking Why Dave decided to tackle email, a notoriously difficult field How Inky battle's people's paranoid that real email will get stuck in spam Bringing machine learning to your email inbox to help you get the information you need Why email clients make it really difficult to build an MVP The first action Dave took after having the idea for Inky The two major challenges currently facing Inky Links mentioned in this show include: Inky ITA Software Hacker News Dave Bagget on Quora Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Dave on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Dave know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter (you can edit the tweet first): Click here to thank Dave on Twitter! Comments? Are you finding that your MVP is a lot more difficult than you originally thought? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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024 : Becoming a life-long learner with Scott Britton
I first met Scott Britton when I took his in-person Skillshare class titled "30+ Life Hacks to have more money, time, energy, and well-being." Since then, he's built himself an empire, building his blog Life-Long Learner into an amazing resource for people wanting to build the life they want. On this week's podcast, I talk to him about his journey, and about how he transitioned from business development into online marketing. This interview is full of actionable information. Here's what we chat about: How Life-Long Learner grew from a business development job into an empire The reason why Scott has his very first blog posts as a canned response in Gmail It doesn't matter if you don't know what you're doing — no one else does either Scott's Utopia Mindset, and how it can help you get the life you want The questions Scott asks people in order to grow his network How Scott makes his online courses One thousand true fans The most important different between digital assets and physical products Why Scott changed his mind about how much sleep he needs How Scott makes sure his actions match his goals in life Using systems to save time when making a podcast Links mentioned in this show include: TripExpert Michael Hartl's Rails Tutorial Bootstrap How to launch your own website - free NNL video tutorial! Skillshare (it's different now than it was when Scott and I taught there) Never Eat Alone by Keith Ferrazzi Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert B., PhD Cialdini Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success by Adam M. Grant Ph.D. 1,000 True Fans The Competitive Edge podcast (iTunes link) Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Scott on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Scott know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Scott on Twitter! Comments? What's a skill that you could teach? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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023 : An entity’s warm blanket with Matthew Moisan
When I was talking to my friend Andrew about joining him to help co-found TripExpert, I was handed a big stack of legal papers to trudge through and eventually sign. As I was reading them, my eyes began to cross. I thought I understood most of it, but I had no idea whether anything in there was good or bad, or if anything should be added or removed. I knew I needed to get some help from someone who was better versed in founders' agreements than me. On the recommendation of a friend, I got in touch with a lawyer specializing in startups and had him take a look. With just a 30-minute phone call and a few emails back in forth, he potentially saved me thousands (if not tens of thousands) of dollars. And I now had full understanding of the document I was signing. Law can be an intimidating field, and first-time entrepreneurs often have so many unanswered questions: when should you talk to a lawyer? What type of lawyer should you hire? Where can you even find a lawyer? My guest today is Matthew Moisan of Moisan Legal. We discuss exactly what you need to know about law as you're delving into entrepreneurship, and how to best set yourself up for success. In just 50 minutes, he'll raise you out of law novice-dom, and there's honestly not a dull moment. Here's what we chat about: Exactly why lawyers' hours are so long and tedious, especially in the first few years At what point in your product or app development process is it time to talk to a lawyer? You have a couple apps in the app store...should you form an entity? Where do you find a lawyer when you're ready to form an entity, and what should you look for? The one difference you need to know between LLCs and Corporations The type of Corp that venture capitalists want to see Why Delaware is such a magical place for entrepreneurs Why you might want to get your own lawyer when co-founding a company How a lawyer told me about 83(b) elections and potentially saved me a ton of money The biggest law-related mistake that first-time entrepreneurs make Resources that can help you prepare for your interactions with lawyers Links mentioned in this show include: TripExpert - Finally, hotel reviews you can trust Moisan Legal Move your brain online, get a bigger hard drive (Novice No Longer) Deduct It!: Lower Your Small Business Taxes by Stephen Fishman FeldThoughts - Brad Feld's blog AVC - Fred Wilson's bog Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Matthew on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Matthew know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Matthew on Twitter! Comments? Are you thinking about forming an LLC or Corporation? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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022 : Why you should have started a blog yesterday
In this week's podcast episode, I share how I escaped the retail world and got into tech journalism. It's all because of a little personal website I started. I also explain how you, too, can benefit from starting your own website — even if you don't want to get int journalism — and how to do it. This is a special edition of the podcast because there's no guest, it's just me! I ended up getting so much feedback and so many questions about last week's podcast that I wanted to tell my story in more depth. If you don't yet have your own website, you need to listen to this episode. When you're ready to get going, I've embedded the first tutorial in my video course. If you found this helpful, please use my Bluehost affiliate link to get your hosting and domain! Check out the rest of the videos here! Here's what I talk about: How I got a job in tech journalism with only a retail work background How my first website began as a vinyl sticker that just said "moist" Why I used Wordpress for my first blog, and why you should too Wordpress.com VS Wordpress.org SEO tricks that will help you get organic traffic for your content How a post about my magnet implant got my a job in journalism The story behind my first iPhone apps What you do becomes your identity without you even realizing it The difference between hosting and a domain name What you should change for every single fresh Wordpress install The easy things you can do to vastly improve your website's SEO What you should write about on your blog, even if you're not a writer Links mentioned in this show include: Sponsor: Planet 1107 Cinema Sewer (NSFW) Sticker Guy IAmDann.com 6-Minute Website NNL Tutorial Daring Fireball Marco.org Body Hacking: My Magnetic Implant Hacker News Mediabistro Michael Hartl's Rails Tutorial How I built and promoted WorkBurst TripExpert...launching soon! Bluehost - hosting and domain name 013 : It’s not just SEO, it’s building a brand with John DeFeo Did you enjoy this episode? Share it on Twitter If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let me know by sharing it with your followers: Click here to share this post on Twitter! (you can edit it first!) Comments? Have you started your own website? Share the link in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Photo by Michael Shane. Thanks again for listening!
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021 : Pitching, press, and passion with TechRadar’s Joe Osborne
When I was in high school, I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life. I ended up taking a theater class as an elective freshman year (my mother's suggestion) and loved it. I took more and more classes until I was eventually staring in almost all my high school plays (oh god, don't click that link). It only seemed natural to carry that passion over to college (as I still had no idea what I wanted to do) so I enrolled as a Theater major. But when I got to college, I just didn't feel like acting any more. It was my creative writing classes that were the most fun for me, so I switched to an English and Creative Writing tract. For my honors thesis, I wrote a play. But I still didn't know what I wanted to do. When I graduated, I got a job in the mall at French Connection selling clothes. I was still working retail when I launched my first blog, IAmDann.com, and just wrote about random stuff. Seriously, go back to the first posts on IAmDann.com and check out the unorganized and unfocused content I was producing. But I kept writing, and kept posting content. And after a couple years, I had a realization: I was a writer who wrote a play and had a two-year-old blog. As I was doing all that work, it didn't feel like I was accomplishing anything. And even though I didn't have much focus during any of that time, I suddenly had a pretty impressive sounding CV. I used that blog to land a full-time writing job at LAPTOP Magazine, and the rest is history. When people say that you should follow your passion and do what you love, it's because someday it'll be valuable. If you love video games, and write a short post after every video game you play, it won't feel like work. You might not even get any traffic. But eventually you'll have a massive portfolio of work and you can turn that into a real, paying job. My guest today is Joe Osborne, Reviews Editor at TechRadar, who is passionate about technology and video games. Unlike me, he had focus from early on, writing for small local blogs and systematically working his way up to his current position. In this episode of the podcast, he shares exactly how he did it, what he looks for in pitches, and shares his thoughts on the future of tech. This episode is just plain fun, and it goes to show that you really should be pursuing your passion, even if it doesn't feel like you're getting anywhere as you're doing it. Here's what we chat about: How Joe used writing for free as a tactic for becoming a tech journalist The difference between full-time freelancing and being a staff writer How Joe spends his time as a Reviews Editor Different approaches to tech reviews: all-inclusive or extremely selective The trick Joe uses to manage his busy email inbox What happens when you send a product pitch to TechRadar Working smart (not hard) when pitching your product How paying attention to a website's community can help you pitch The future of laptops...is it the new Microsoft Surface? Which devices people use depends on the time of day Will the laptops of the future be strictly work devices? What does it mean for a device to be "in development" for three years? How we're moving more and more computing power to the cloud Links mentioned in this show include: Sponsor: Planet1107 app development (10% off!) Geekadelphia Second-generation Nest thermostat gets slimmer, more compatible MoDev UX Conference TechRadar Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Joe on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Joe know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Joe on Twitter! Comments? What do you think the laptops of the future will look like? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss!
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020 : Gotta keep hustling with Laura and Sara of DigitalFlash
Have you ever gone to an event and thought it was just "meh"? Maybe you signed up because of the awesome lineup of panelists, but the questions posed by the moderator were just boring and there wasn't any opportunity to ask questions. Or maybe the food sucked and all you wanted was a drink. Laura and Sara met at a networking event that just didn't suit their tastes. But they didn't let it bother them — they turned their experiences into opportunity. Both Sara and Laura knew that together, they could throw amazing events, and they did just that. DigitalFlash grew out of a desire for the types of events that the cofounders wanted to attend, and people responded. In this podcast, the two co-founders share how their events grew and how they started creating digital experiences for larger companies. If you visited the Samsung booth at the 2014 SXSW, you were a part of their work. These two women are the very definition of the word hustle — they even left a convention floor in Vegas to appear on this podcast! They never stop. If you need some motivation to keep on keeping on, this is the episode for you. Here's what we chat about: Putting the social back in social networking The art and science of going to events The conversations cofounders have when they first meet Seeing opportunity in the things you want to do Creating an event where competitors talk together Networking by inviting people onto your panel or show Hitting Samsung's goals for SXSW What it means to never stop hustling The correct way to network Links mentioned in this show include: Sponsor: Planet 1107 The Wirecutter DigitalFlash Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Laura and Sara on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let the people behind DigitalFlash know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Laura and Sara on Twitter! Comments? What's your hustle? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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019 : Passive income through YouTube and Kindle with Brian Yang
Most people think securing passive income is all about releasing a killer online product that generates a boatload of income and will continue to sell itself in perpetuity. With this mindset, people will often sit around doing nothing, waiting for the "perfect idea" to strike. Or they'll spend years tweaking their product, making small changes with every new article or tutorial they read, but never actually release the finished version. But passive income isn't about creating and releasing a perfect product that nets thousands of dollars. It's about setting up lots of smaller imperfect products, testing the market, and perfecting the most effective income generators. Once your goal become diversifying your offerings, instead is creating a perfect single product, you'll start seeing the money start rolling in. And that money will only snowball larger as it's reinvested. My guest today is Brian Yang, an online entrepreneur and the most popular dance teacher for men on YouTube. He shares exactly how he built his YouTube business, as well as what he's doing in the Kindle Marketplace. Here's what we chat about: Finding opportunity in your competition's shortcomings The exact workflow people are using to make money with YouTube videos Brian's original setup for shooting videos (which you can probably do yourself right now) How Brian knew exactly what to say in his dance videos Why Brian waited so long before launching his website (and wasn't worried about it) Why you should be making information products Information products aren't really about information, they're about time Why Brian recently spent $2,000 on an online course, and is thrilled about it How Brian has amassed over 600 Kindle books Links mentioned in this show include: Sponsor: MoDev UX Conference (Coupon code NNL30 for 30% off!) Brian on Reddit 4-Hour Workweek by Tim Ferriss How to Dance - For Men (Brian's YouTube Channel) Hustle and Design Udemy.com Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Brian on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Brian know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Brian on Twitter! Comments? What's the most valuable information product you've ever purchased? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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018 : Peering into the future of tech with Dan Howley
This episode of the podcast is a little different from the others. Usually my guests share their entrepreneurial stories, step-by-step, in order to help you on your journey. But sometimes we need to step back and take a look at the bigger picture. This episode is all about ideas. My guest today is Daniel Howley, senior writer at LAPTOP Magazine. We spend an hour talking about tech. But not today's tech, we talk about what's going to be happening tomorrow and beyond. Do you know who made the most money as mobile developers? The people who built the very first iOS apps. If there's a new paradigm-shift technology coming, you want to start thinking about it now so that you're able to get in on the ground floor when it launches. If you're a technology novice, this episode will take you out of the novice stage. Here's what we chat about: What do people mean when they say "wearables" Why smartphones are just a transitional technology The two types of people in the world: people who like Google Glass and everyone else Apple isn't the first out with technology — it waits until it has the best product Internet connectivity...untethered Why T-Mobile may soon be the cellular company to beat Can you really call it 4G speed when it only works on five street corners? Pseudo-social networks like Snapchat and Secret and why they're the future How Snapchat is relevant even if you're not sending nudes Links mentioned in this show include: 002 : Getting press in a crowded marketplace with Dan Howley Apple's WWDC Android Wear Moto 360 Smartwatch Watch the best of T-Mobile CEO John Legere (so far) - The Verge HIGH-SCHOOL TEACHER: In 16 Years Of Teaching, Nothing Has Disrupted My Classroom More Than Snapchat's New Update Leo's Fortune (iOS) Link Bubble Pro (Android) Dark Sky (iOS) Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Dan on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Dan know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Dan on Twitter! Comments? What do you think technology will look like in ten years? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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017 : Using apps to fund apps with Bobby Gill
I was really into zines when I was in high school. I spent almost all my time on alt.zines, spent way too much time hunting for old issues of Urban Hermitt, and constantly found myself browsing the fantastic zine section at Tower Records. Almost all my money went to Microcosm Publishing. But whenever I'd browse Microcosm Publishing, one number always caught my eye: the wholesale pricing. It was so much less than the full price. I wanted to pay that price, not retail. I launched my own zine distribution, Deranged Distro, and stocked only the zines that I wanted to read. Selling copies more than made up for the cost of the issues I bought myself. It was a perfect situation. My guest today is Bobby Gill, founder of BlueLabel Labs. BlueLabel Labs doesn't just build apps for other people, it spends half its time working on its own mobile applications. Bobby has a passion for apps and some fantastic business insights. He even shares the reason why his new iOS game is only available in Canada. Here's what we chat about: What it's like to work at Microsoft Learning how to manage a team and allocate resources as a program manager Why it can feel stifling to work for a large company Why it's totally stupid for people to go to college right out of high school What sort of people use BlueLabel Labs to build an app, and what stage the ideas are in Why BlueLabel Labs spends half its time working on their own projects How building games is different than building apps Why you might want to release in a single country before making your app internationally available Links mentioned in this show include: BlueLabel Labs Word Hack (iOS) Threes (iOS) 2048 (iOS) Threes creators express puzzlement, sadness over 2048 and rampant cloning (Polygon) Color Labs Appsters IdeatoAppster.com Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Bobby on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Bobby know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Bobby on Twitter! Comments? Have you ever started a business to support a passion? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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016 : When the consultant gets interns with Lis Hubert
I love talking to programmers who no longer spend majority of their time writing code. Having a background in software development bring such a unique and analytical perspective to even project, and that's definitely true of this week's podcast episode. My guest is Lis Hubert, the user experience consultant behind Hubert Experience Design. She was writing Java when she got her first information architecture job offer, and her career has blossomed from there. I talk to her about her experiences in the field and she even shares was it was like to hire two interns at her one-woman UX operation last year. Entrepreneurship is about working for yourself, and that's exactly what Lis is doing. There's great information in here if you're looking to do the same. Here's what we chat about: Information architecture and its relationship to user experience How information architecture is just like traditional architecture How Lis started consulting when she lost her job How to networking, even if you're an introvert When you hire a UX consultant, what's the first thing that happens? How things have changed in the UX world in recent years How UX has changed with the introduction of powerful mobile devices How does Google Glass fit into the technological landscape? Bringing interns into a one-person consulting organization Why a thick skin in required when getting into UX Links mentioned in this show include: Hubert Experience Design How Being a Jock Makes a Better Interaction Designer Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Lis on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Lis know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Lis on Twitter! Comments? Have you had an internship? What did you do? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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015 : Podcasting for business and pleasure with Steve Young
The Novice No Longer Podcast is getting meta. This week's guest is the talented Steve Young, post of the Mobile App Chat podcast. I'm so excited to have another podcaster on the show because we get to talk about one of my favorite topics ever: podcasting. Steve walks you through, step-by-step, how to create your own podcast. He's got so many tips and tricks that I'm now completely changing around my podcast processing process! He also talks about his new membership site, App Masters, which has a ton of great courses to help you build a business around your apps. We also talk about mastermind groups, which have been instrumental to Steve's success. I'm now totally inspired to start my own. This episode was just plain fun to record. I'm sure you'll be able to tell. Here's what we chat about: Reasons why you should start a podcast You don't have to be an expert, you have to want to talk to experts How to figure out a topic for your podcast How to prepare for an interview with a podcast guest How to get your first guests The tools you should use to create your podcast Why you shouldn't edit out mistakes Why Steve started a mastermind group and how it benefited him Links mentioned in this show include: Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert B. Cialdini, PhD Entrepreneur on Fire Rode Podcaster microphone Blue Snowball microphone Ecamm Call Recorder for Skype Fiverr.com ScheduleOnce Intro Machine Auphonic Soundcloud Audio Hijack Pro Hyperbole and a Half Alex Barker's Hangout and Grow Rich class Eventual Millionaire Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Steve on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Steve know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Steve on Twitter! Comments? Are you thinking about starting a podcast? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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014 : The User Doesn’t Always Need It Easy with Mona Patel
You probably have an idea for an app or website, and you think that people would use it, but how can you find out what will really happen when you put your product out into the world? The field of user experience is about way more than laying out websites so they're easy to use — it's a combination of design, psychology, and science. You have to do research, create a hypothesis, test your hypothesis, and change accordingly. You have to figure out what the user really wants to do. This week on the podcast, I talk to Mona Patel, the founder and CEO of Motivate Design and UXHires. We talk about what it's like to found and run a UX agency and what entrepreneurs can do to instantly improve their user's experience. We even peer out into the future a little, and Mona shares why she thinks virtual reality will completely change the way people experience the world. She says something I have never even thought about that completely blew my mind. This episode will help you stop building products and start building products that people will actually use. Here's what we chat about: What it means to put the user in the center of the design process Usability as the origins of user experience Why the Mini Cooper website was absolutely terrible but it didn't matter How sometimes the most important realizations happen while on vacation Listening to intuition and why it feels so wrong every time When does a company need to talk to a UX agency? Three important aspects of user experience research Why Facebook is investing heavily in virtual reality What entrepreneurs can do to improve the UX of their products Yes people and No people, and which you should surround yourself with Links mentioned in this show include: Motivate Design The UX Lab Meetup (NYC) Sponsor: Planet 1107 Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Mona on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Mona know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Mona on Twitter! Comments? Has your user ever surprised you? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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013 : It’s not just SEO, it’s building a brand with John DeFeo
Search engine optimization (SEO) can mean a lot of things to a lot of different people. We all know the results of SEO — your website gets launched to the front page of Google search results, but very few know what to do to make that happen. Everyone knows that they should be doing it, but they don't know what it is. And then there's some people, like John DeFeo, who do this stuff for a living. I invited John on the show to share his knowledge and passion for marketing and branding. We talk about the best practices for both launching a new site or fixing your current site, and he shares why getting to the front page of Google is about so much more than collecting back links. If you want to build a visible online business or market your product on the web, this is an episode you need to hear. Here's what we chat about: Why SEO has become way more than website structural information Black Hat versus White Hat SEO Google's Penguin update and how it affected the web The math behind PageRank (and it has nothing to do with the search result page you're on The potential dangers of personalized search How search results are a zero-sum game Why you should never ever ever ever buy an "article spinner" What is a link profile and how you can generate yours Off-label use for Google's search autocomplete Why you need to write meta descriptions for all your pages Canonical tags and why they're so damn important Why you always see questions marks in URLs, and what that means The most surprising source of traffic for my websites Links mentioned in this show include: Google Webmaster Tools Google Analytics Google Trends Google Adwords keywords planner The First News Report on the L.A. Earthquake Was Written by a Robot by Will Oremus All in One SEO Pack Did you enjoy this episode? Thank John on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let John know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank John on Twitter! Comments? Were you hurt by Google's Penguin update? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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012 : Making Sex Tech Mainstream with Cindy Gallop
There's a technology sector that has the potential for insanely high returns, yet no investor wants anywhere near it. On this week's podcast, I talk to Cindy Gallop, founder of MakeLoveNotPorn.tv (adult content), about the challenges of creating a sex-tech startup and the benefits of removing shame and stigma from the national conversation about sex. Just a warning, today's episode contains both adult language and content. This is also one of the most important episodes of the podcast I've ever released. The things Cindy Gallop is doing are absolutely amazing, and I'm so honored to have her on the show to share her story. I've been a subscriber to MakeLoveNotPorn.tv since seeing her TED talk, and she continues to pave the way towards making the world a better place. This is one episode you won't want to miss. Here's what we chat about: The impact of always-available pornography on young men How Cindy's educational website turned into a video sharing website How sex education needs to adapt to reach the younger generation Improving the world by taking the shame and embarrassment out of sex and nudity Celebrating sex just like you'd celebrate other important life events The three words that kill almost every sex-tech startup: "no adult content" Disarming "revenge porn" Porn stars having real-world sex: how it's completely different from the porn videos we know Becoming the Y Combinator of sex Why the "next big thing" in tech is changing the world through sex Links mentioned in this show include: Cindy Gallop TED talk MakeLoveNotPorn.tv DOWN app (formerly Bang With Friends) Vibease NY Tech Meetup (Sponsor) Planet 1107 app development Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Cindy on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Cindy know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Cindy on Twitter! Comments? What was the last sex related purchase you've made? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Photograph of Cindy Gallop by Kevin Abosch. Thanks again for listening!
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011 : Using Adwords for Rapid Business Growth with Brian Kaldenberg
Successful entrepreneurs aren't the people who come up with brilliant, unique ideas. Instead, they're the ones who solve people's problems. If you're banging your head against your desk trying to think of a good idea, you're doing it all wrong. Talk to people, find out where they're struggling, and ask them about their ideal solution. BAM! They're giving you real and proven ideas. My guest today is neither a writer nor an editor, yet he's the founder of ProofreadingPal. Brian Kaldenberg is a wildly successful problem solver. He found a specific need (proofreading services), did keyword research to investigate the market, and built a minimum viable product. Now his company is almost four years old and rapidly growing. We discuss the early days of ProofreadingPal and how Brian grew his business to where it is today. He also shares his Adwords tactics — invaluable information for people trying to drive online traffic. Here's what we chat about: Using freelancers to build your minimum viable product The long hours associated with starting a business How Brian vets the proof readers on ProofreadingPal Why it's good to have competition and how to deal with it All the features left out of first version of ProofreadingPal How to use Adwords to create revenue How you can get feedback from your customers Brian's advice if you want to start a successful online business using Adwords Links mentioned in this show include: ProofreadingPal Gamerosters.com Odesk.com Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Brian on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Brian know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Brian on Twitter! Comments? Do you have any experience with Adwords? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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010 : Getting Investor-Ready with Einas Ibrahim
Do you have an app or a business? Are you trying to find an investor? Do you really need an investor? Where can you even find an investor? What would you say to an interested investor? What's the value of your company? How do you know the value of your company? What on earth are you doing with your life?  Einas Ibrahim of Talem Advisory is here to lead you through the darkness. She was a developer before getting into finance and then finally taking on the startup world. She works with early stage ventures and small businesses, providing strategic and financial advisory and getting them investor-ready. Basically, she's pretty amazing. On this episode, we discuss how to turn a product into an actual business, as well as explore the world of angel investing and venture capital. If you're wondering what ABC's Shark Tank looks like in the real world, here it is. Here's what we chat about: The difference between an app and a business How do you know when you're ready for an investor? The difference between angel investors and venture capitalists Personality or financials: which is more important? Was it your idea, or was the market just too small? What can a startup's valuation tell you about the entrepreneurs? How much equity should you give to investors? Building relationships with investors using social media Links mentioned in this show include: Is 'Shark Tank' Really Worth 5% Of Your Company? Business Owners Say 'Absolutely' Meetup.com Talem Advisory Einas Ibrahim on LinkedIn Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Einas on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Einas know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Einas on Twitter! Comments? Do you think you're ready to start hunting for an investor? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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009 : Speaking Tech, the required language of the future with Vinay Trivedi
When you come from a non-technical background, listening to developers speak can sound a lot like FDJKFJ CJ KCDJK REJISJ KLSSJ K  SKD. Fortunately, my guest this week is here to help. Vinay Trivedi is the author of How to Speak Tech: The Non-Techie's Guide to Technology Basics in Business. In this episode, we talk about specific things that non-technical people should learn in order to remain relevant in the workforce. When you're a novice, sometimes you don't even know what questions you should be asking. Vinay helps lay a solid tech foundation so that you'll be able to use where ever your learning takes you in the future. If you're ready for developers to stop sounding like they're speaking in tongue, it's time to listen up. Here's what we chat about: Why it's more important than ever to understand technology Using How to Speak Tech as a jumping-off point to getting a job in tech How learning about technology takes "magic" out of your favorite websites, and why that's a good thing The difference between front end and back end programming languages Low level languages versus higher level languages What is an API? How can you use them? Where to find them? What the heck is version control and what is Github? Why getting your product back from your developers is not the end What does it mean for a website to be secure? Links mentioned in this show include: Github Codecademy Code School Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Vinay on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Vinay know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Vinay on Twitter! Comments? How did you get over the technology learning hump? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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008 : Securing your startup’s foundation with Nihal Parthasarathi
In this week's episode of the podcast, I talk to Nihal Parthasarathi, the cofounder of CourseHorse, an online marketplace for finding and taking local classes. He shares the story of how CourseHorse came into existence, step-by-step, from idea to rapidly growing company. Nihal's story is extremely inspiring, because he follows all the right steps and is reaping the benefits. He shares how he came up with the idea for CourseHorse as well as all the work he and his cofounder did before even looking for a developer. There are a ton of valuable insights in this podcast, you'll definitely want to listen. Here's what we chat about: The only truly effective way to find good business ideas You have an idea for a business — what's step one? Methods for getting your potential users to talk to you What to do before hiring a developer How to best spend your time while your site is being built How much input you should have in the CMS/language of your site The contest that jumpstarted CourseHorse Links mentioned in this show include: CourseHorse Axure wireframe software and mockup tool ABC's Shark Tank Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Nihal on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Nihal know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Nihal on Twitter! Comments? Have you had a hard time finding classes online? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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007 : Getting The Verge to take notice with Dan Seifert
When you're launching a new product or service, getting press on a website like The Verge can really be the deciding factor between massive success and slipping into obscurity. Yet entrepreneurs still make the same mistakes, over and over, when emailing and pitching journalists. Dan Seifert is a Reviews Editor at The Verge and his email inbox is constantly full of pitches from both solo entrepreneurs and professional marketing companies. In this week's episode of the podcast, we talk about which emails get replies and which get instantly archived. He also shares the common marketing tactic that comes off as insulting, and how to best build a rapport with journalists before pitching. After listening to this podcast, you'll be able to write pitches better than 90 percent of your competitors. And that's not an exaggeration. Here's what we chat about: How journalists manage their oft-overwhelming inboxes The simple mistake that will greatly increase your change of being ignored Tactics for getting noticed if you see a competitor get press How to use Twitter to get noticed One essential element of a PR email that so many people forget Should you email a full pitch or just a teaser to see if they want more info? How The Verge communicates with each other behind the scenes What you should do if you want to be noticed by Dan right now Links mentioned in this show include: Managing your inbox with two simple folders The quantified workout: one run, eight trackers Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Dan on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Dan know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Dan on Twitter! Comments? Have you written any pitches that have fallen flat? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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006 : Screw the Queue with Gabe Velez
Waiting in line sucks. It sucks so much that many people are willing to pay to avoid lines. Whether you're dying to be the first with an iPhone 5S (without waiting 100 hours in line) or you want to make your trip to Disneyland a little less tedious, those who have the means will do anything to jump to the front. My guest today is Gabriel Velez, a graphic designer and co-creator of Linesnapp, a mobile app focused disrupting the line. Gabe met his cofounder, Rafael Maya, at a hackathon and the two have been working on rethinking queues ever since. I really respect what Gabe and Rafael are doing, because they're not just blindly following their ideas. Instead, they're talking to users and constantly changing their approach in order to find the version that sticks. You'll definitely want to hear what Gabe has been doing. Here's what we chat about: Why good design is more important now than in recent years What we can do versus what we should do Advantages of word-of-mouth clients when growing your freelance business Hackathons! Why it's important to start with customer development Why designing for Android sucks How to hire a designer when you don't know design Links mentioned in this show include: Linesnapp AngelHack Startup Weekend TaskRabbit Waze Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Gabe on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Gabe know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Gabe on Twitter! Comments? Did you ever change your original idea as a direct result of talking to potential users? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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005 : Fostering good design when you’re artistically inept with Mike Blea
I first met Mike Blea (of Michael Blea Design) when I worked at LAPTOP Magazine. He was part of the magazine's design team, building the magazine's layout, mocking up covers, and helping with graphics for web. We've remained friends even after both of us left that job, and Mike even helped me design the cover for 8 Things to Learn Before Making Your App. I wanted to bring Mike on the show to have a fresh perspective on building products. I, personally, am completely design challenged — a glaringly apparent fact when looking at the first version of my first app Reader Tracker. I've learned a lot about the value of good design since then, and Mike has definitely helped me out along the way. Mike gives some insights into the life of a professional designers and shares some tips for hiring a freelance designer of your own. If you work it right, you won't end up spending a fortune. Here's what we chat about: Going from mocking art to making a living from it Getting Photoshop doesn't make you a designer any more than Xcode will make you a developer How to foster an appreciation for art How a background in math and science can help make better art Why it's important to start with pen and paper Why people are so over Christmas by the end of the season The difference between Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Why user interface design is so different from traditional print layouts What to look for when hiring a freelance designer Links mentioned in this show include: Golden Ratio Vitruvian Man Adobe Kuler Color Scheme Designer Lynda.com Dark Patterns Don't Make Me Think by Steve Krug Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Mike on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Mike know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Mike on Twitter! Comments? Are there any user experience designs that drive you absolutely crazy? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. Theme music by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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004 : Conquering the niche app and reaping the rewards with Massimo Biolcati
Some entrepreneurs spend their entire lives trying to build the Next Big Thing, but there's another much more successful group of business owners: lifestyle entrepreneurs. The best part about being in the latter group is that there is practically no luck involved, just skills that can be practiced and learned. Follow a fairly simple formula and you'll find success. On this weeks episode of the podcast, I talked to Massimo, the creator of iReal Pro, an amazing music app that helps musicians practice and prepare for gigs. Massimo has been absolutely killing it with his niche app since 2008, and it doesn't look like things are slowing down anytime soon. I really respect Massimo because he had an idea for a useful app, taught himself how to code, and went on to build a product that absolutely dominates his niche. He shares his tactics for getting recurring revenue through in-app purchases, and why he has no fear of larger companies like Apple and Google. If you want a reliable formula for creating income-generating apps, you'll want to listen to this episode. Here's what we chat about: How inspiration struck for iReal Pro How Massimo taught himself to code as an adult Differences between learning to programming and learning to create apps How new version of iOS impact programming and writing iOS apps Why having multiple size screens is so challenging How to create an app that's guaranteed to make money How Massimo makes computerized music sound like a real band Why it's so much harder to innovate for Android Create a revolving cycle of premium features Links mentioned in this show include: Programming in Objective-C by Stephen Kochan Big Nerd Ranch Github Codecademy Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Massimo on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Massimo know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Massimo on Twitter! Comments? Do you have a niche app that you love, but no one else seems to know about it? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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003 : Building the ultimate roommate finder with Ajay Yadav
What would you do if you came back to your apartment after a trip abroad to find out that your roommate had disappeared with the deposit, the locks had been changed, and your stuff was missing? I know my response would involve a large number of guttural screams and a healthy amount of crying. Ajay, on the other hand, used it as inspiration to build Roomi, an app that helps people find ideal roommates. List or browse apartments, describe your lifestyle, and never get stuck with a nightmare roommate again. After a ton of research, Ajay built Roomi from scratch — learning Objective-C in a few months using free online resources, hiring a designer, and creating a minimum viable product (MVP). He's learned from past mistakes and really did it right this time. If you're still struggling to figure out your best next move, listen to this episode and follow in Ajay's steps. You'll come out with an awesome product. Here's what we chat about: Finding inspiration in absolutely terrible life events How to test your idea to avoid unnecessary work How failure can lead to success and the importance of the lean startup methodology Why you need solid research before doing anything else How to find and hire a freelance designer Giving equity versus paying your freelancer How iOS 7 changes everything Can you get users without doing any marketing? The single change that caused a 3X increase in app usage What it's like at TechCrunch's Startup Alley How to teach yourself to code Methods for finding advisors and mentors Links mentioned in this show include: Codecademy Treehouse Ryan Carson's The Naive Optimist Code School Rails for Zombies Skillshare's Program iPhone Apps: Become an iPhone Developer Github Stackexchange Firebase Parse Crunchbase Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Ajay on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Ajay know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Ajay on Twitter! Comments? What was something new that you learned from this episode? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? There's a new episode every week, so subscribe to stay in the loop! I have some amazing guests lined up that you won't want to miss! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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002 : Getting press in a crowded marketplace with Daniel Howley
LAPTOP Magazine's Daniel Howley joins me to talk about the do's and don'ts about pitching your product to the press. Tech journalists' email inboxes are particularly full this time of year because of CES, an annual trade show that's the main event for many companies in the technology industry. But with lots of emails comes lots of inefficient emails. Did you know that out of 50 PR emails, Daniel only actually uses about five? If you're a small startup or sole developer, you need to be one of those five emails in order to survive. Daniel shares what it takes to get read and noticed, and these strategies can be applied immediately. (Hint: It's not as hard as you might think.) Here's what we chat about: How to get your email noticed in the crazy inbox of a tech journalist Fatal mistakes made by big PR companies (and how to avoid them) How to capitalize on your competitor's press One mistake that results in journalists immediately deleting your email What goes on behind the scenes of tech publications A ready-to-use formula for writing effective press releases How to avoid being "old news" The most overdone product category at this year's CES Are wearables the next evolution of technology? How Apple could kill it with their rumored "iWatch" Why live TV and Radio won't be going away any time soon Links mentioned in this show include: Fire drill: can Tony Fadell and Nest build a better smoke detector? Shootout: Best Portable Scanners The quantified workout: one run, eight trackers The creepiest smartwatch commercial you'll ever see Pebble smartwatch Aereo 1010 WINS news radio Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Daniel on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Daniel know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Daniel on Twitter! Comments? Have you tried to pitch your product to the press before? How did it work? Let us know in the comments below! Can't get enough? I've got even more amazing guests lined up, so you're definitely going to want to tune in and see what's coming next. I've got graphic designers, developers, app makers, and more journalists to come! Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I’d also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here. The Novice No Longer Podcast intro music was composed by the talented Will Larche. Thanks again for listening!
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(Short) 5 easy changes that will drastically improve your life
These are five little changes that will have the biggest impact on your life and productivity. This is a Novice No Longer Podcast short. Read the full article here: http://novicenolonger.com/easy-changes-that-will-drastically-improve-your-life/ If you enjoy the Podcast, please rate it on iTunes!
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001 : It’s never too late to become a coder with Will Larche
In this inaugural episode of the Novice No Longer Podcast, I'm joined by Will Larche, the Lead iOS Developer at LearnVest. This episode is a little different than the stuff I usually teach — I almost always tell my students to hire a developer rather than learn to code themselves. But sometimes learning to program is the right path, and Will proves that anyone can become a developer, regardless of previous experience. Will is an artist, graduating with a BFA in Musical Theater. He's now able to maintain his lifestyle as an artist and composer by working as a mobile developer — one of the most in-demand jobs at the moment. I really respect Will for a few reasons: He taught himself to code as an adult, with no previous technical background. It sometimes feels like today's programmers have been writing code since childhood, and catching up to their skill level can seem daunting. But Will took his first coding class when he was 28 and worked his way into a Lead Developer role by age 30! He has found a way to support his true passion. Will is still actively writing and performing musicals, and he's able to support that passion by having a skill that's guaranteed to make money. It's so much better than bussing tables. He's passionate about teaching others to code. Will has used his experiences to help teach others to follow in the same footsteps. He taught a free class in New York City aimed at giving women the skills they need to enter the predominately male-dominated programming world. In this episode, you'll hear how Will went from taking his first programming class (in the wrong language!) to becoming a Junior Developer within one year. It took a lot of hard work, but his experience can be replicated. He shares what he's learned since becoming the lead iOS developer at a successful New York City-based startup, and what he's done to attract the attention —and marketing power — of Apple itself. I'm proud to kick off the podcast with someone as interesting and accomplished as Will. Whether you're thinking about a career change into the technology field, or simply have an interest in building successful apps, this podcast will be extremely helpful. Here's what we chat about: Starting from nothing: how to teach yourself to code Apple's default UI elements and the importance of good graphic design The process of updating an app for iOS7 Key differences between smartphones and tablets How people use different devices Marketing and business in a post-mobile world Why it's important to get customers before building a product How to get ahead of the competition by paying close attention to Apple Why women are the next big thing in programming Links mentioned in this show include: Learnvest Lesbian Love Octagon musical Programming in Objective-C by Stephen Kochan Stack Exchange Codecademy Ruby on Rails Tutorial by Michael Hartl Cover The Magazine WWDC Resources Did you enjoy this episode? Thank Will on Twitter! If you thought this episode of the podcast was interesting, take a few seconds and let Will know by clicking the link below to share via Twitter: Click here to thank Will on Twitter! Comments? What was the most interesting thing you learned from this episode? Share in the comments below! Can't get enough? This is the first of many podcasts to come. I've got some amazing people scheduled in the next few weeks, including independent app developers and writers for some of the top tech publications who share the secrets for getting good press. Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via Stitcher Click here to subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you have a moment, I'd also really appreciate you leaving an honest rating and review of the Novice No Longer podcast. It helps immensely with iTunes search and ranking, and helps other people discover this new show. You can rate it by clicking here.
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Welcome to the Novice No Longer Podcast
Welcome to the Novice No Longer podcast! Every week, I'll be talking to entrepreneurs, builders, designers, and journalists to give you information to help you build better products and get the press you deserve. In this short introduction episode, I tell you a little bit about my own background and how this website and podcast came to be. I hope you'll tune in and check it out every week. Stay in touch by subscribing via iTunes or RSS. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on iTunes! It helps me a ton and help other people find the show.
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