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Compelling interviews with today's leading authors

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Podcast Episode's:
Alexander Chee, How to Write an Autobiographical Novel. Miami Book Fair
Acclaimed novelist and essayist Alexander Chee joined me at the Miami Book Fair to talk about his work, and his latest collection, How to Write an Autobiographical Novel.
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Danielle Lazarin, BackTalk
Danielle Lazarin talks about her short story collection, Backtalk. We discuss how she got her agent, what she likes about Twitter, and why she's glad she didn't rush into publishing.
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Victoria Patterson, The Little Brother
Victoria Patterson's latest novel, THE LITTLE BROTHER, investigates a rape case -- based on California's Haidl case -- that looks at class, privilege, wealth, and how they affect our justice system as well as the rape culture that underlies it all. In light of the recent Stanford rape case, this discussion is extremely timely.
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Cuban Doctors
From WHYY's The Pulse. Many Cuban doctors come to the US for a better life, but not all of them can use their medical skills once they get here.
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Julie Barer, Literary Agent
In this third installment in our series of conversations with book professionals who are not authors, we talk with literary agent Julie Barer of The Book Group.
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Eileen Myles, I Must Be Living Twice
Recorded live at BookCulture in Manhattan, Eileen Myles discusses her new volume of collected poems, I Must Be Living Twice, and her re-released novel, Chelsea Girls.
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Lauren Cerand, Literary Publicist
In this second installment in our series of conversations with book professionals who are not authors, we talk with literary publicist Lauren Cerand.
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Bethanne Patrick, Book Reviewer and Critic
In this first installment in a series of conversations with book professionals who are not authors, we talk to Bethanne Patrick, a critic and book reviewer. She has a long and rich track record in many areas of the book world.
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Carla Norton, What Doesn't Kill Her
In this conversation, recorded live at BookCulture in Manhattan, author Carla Norton discusses her latest thriller, WHAT DOESN'T KILL HER, in which kidnapper Darry Wayne Flint escapes from the mental hospital and returns to stalk his previous victim.
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Elena DelBanco, The Silver Swan
When world-class cellist Alexander Feldmann dies, the fate of his rare and priceless cello falls into question. Will it go to his daughter Mariana, who sacrificed nearly all to care for him? Or to someone else? Author Elena DelBanco talks about her novel, THE SILVER SWAN.
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Anne Enright, The Green Road
In The Green Road, the four adult children of Rosaleen Madigan come home for one last visit before she sells the family home in County Clare, in the west of Ireland. The novel weaves together the strands of love, misunderstanding, simmering resentment, and all the other complications brought out by family.
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Christopher Bollen, Orient
When Mills Chevern, a young vagabond with a questionable history, rolls into the small and isolated Long Island town of Orient, some of the locals are suspicious. Others take a liking to him. Then the neighborhood handyman turns up dead and an unidentifiable beast washes up on the beach. Christopher Bollen’s new novel, Orient, explores these mysteries.
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Fern Mallis, Fashion Lives
Fern Mallis created New York Fashion Week as we know it. Her latest project is a series of on-stage interviews with top fashion designers, photographers, editors, and others essential to the fashion world. She collected them in a beautiful new book called FASHION LIVES, which we discuss here.
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John C. Hampsey and Richard Hoffman at McNally Jackson Books
Authors John C. Hampsey and Richard Hoffman talk about their works, KAUFMAN'S HILL and LOVE AND FURY, respectively. Both are memoirs of their boyhoods. Recorded live at McNally Jackson Books in New York City.
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Nancy Horan, Under the Wide and Starry Sky
Recorded live at the Southwest Florida Reading Festival, this lively conversation covers Horan's latest novel, a fictionalized version of Robert Louis Stevenson's adventures with his American wife, Fanny.
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Crime Writers Panel, Southwest Florida Reading Festival
Recorded live at the Southwest Florida Reading Festival, this dynamic panel of crime writers features Laura Lippman, Carla Norton and Randy Rawls. We cover research, plotting, and why this genre is considered a "guilty pleasure."
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Jessica Treadway, Lacy Eye
A father is murdered in a brutal home invasion and a daughter's boyfriend is jailed for the crime. Is the daughter also involved? Can family loyalty go too far? This gripping novel explores these and other questions.
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John Benditt, The Boatmaker
A live conversation with author John Benditt about his new novel, THE BOATMAKER, that took place at BookCulture on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. A man builds a boat and sails away from his isolated island to explore the greater world in this fable-like story.
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Daniel Handler, We Are Pirates
The author of the wildly successful Lemony Snicket children's books takes on an adult tale of 3 teens, a man with Alzheimer's and a nursing home orderly who steal a pirate ship and take to the high seas in San Fransisco Bay ... or so they think. Win a signed copy of this book! Subscribe to this podcast then send a screenshot of your subscription to: cary@bksandauthors.com for your chance to win!
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Dinaw Mengestu, The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears
Dinaw Mengestu's novel The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears was the choice for The Big Read, a program where readers in a community read and discuss a particular book together. I had the opportunity to talk with Dinaw about the book, and our community, at the kickoff event.
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Steph Post, A Tree Born Crooked
Only his father’s death could get tough guy James Hart back to his rundown hometown of Crystal Springs, Florida. When he arrives, he learns that he has missed his father’s funeral, but is just in time to get tangled up in his brother’s life of petty, and not so petty, crime. A Tree Born Crooked is the story of James’s return to the life and family he finds he can never really leave.
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Rabih Alameddine, An Unnecessary Woman
Alameddine's latest is a National Book Award finalist and exquisite. Aaliyah Sobhi is 72 years old. She lives alone in her Beirut apartment, and occupies herself by translating books into Arabic. Long divorced and childless, she has the freedom to let her formidable intelligence roam into explorations of her beloved city, politics, war, family, and most of all, literature.
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Cheryl Strayed, Wild and Tiny Beautiful Things
Author Cheryl Strayed discusses her memoir, "Wild," and her collection of Dear Sugar columns from The Rumpus, "Tiny Beautiful Things."
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Bill Roorbach, The Remedy for Love
In The Remedy for Love, a Maine lawyer runs into an unkempt looking young woman at the grocery store and lends a hand at her spartan cabin in the woods. But a huge snowstorm is on the way and the two of them end up there together, running out of food, water and fuel -- and getting to know each other -- for the duration of the storm.
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Elizabeth Rosner, Electric City
Electric City tells the story of the rise and fall of a town along the Hudson River where, in 1887, Thomas Edison relocated his Edison Machine Works. The novel shows the changes in the town and the people who live there right up through the 1960s when a major blackout shows some of the holes in the fabric of the manufacturing powerhouse.
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Caroline Moorehead, Village of Secrets
Caroline Moorehead's Village of Secrets tells the story of a small French village known as Le Chambon-sur-Lignon. Located in a remote and nearly inaccessible section of eastern France, it served as a sanctuary for Jews and others wanted by the Nazis during World War II. Many of the thousands who were shielded there were children who had been orphaned when their parents were taken to concentration camps.
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Peter Mehlman, It Won't Always Be This Great
A Long Island podiatrist stumbles on a bottle of horseradish on a cold Friday night and, in his anger, thoughtlessly chucks it through the window of a local business. That broken window sets of a chain of events, unexpected and hilarious, in the podiatrist’s life that let us see into his disappointments and delights. The author is a long-time writer and executive producer on Seinfeld.
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Ishmael Beah, The Radiance of Tomorrow, Morristown Festival of Books
The Radiance of Tomorrow follows residents of a village in Sierra Leone who return to their home after a devastating civil war has wiped out the place, as well as many of their loved ones.
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Celeste Ng, Everything I Never Told You, Morristown Festival of Books
Celeste Ng was at the Morristown Festival of Books talking about her terrific new novel, Everything I Never Told You. The book traces the life of the Lees, an Asian-American family living in 1970s Ohio.
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Brooklyn Book Festival panel: Clarke, Dubus, Ferris
At the Brooklyn Book Festival in September 2014, Jaime Clarke, Andre Dubus III, and Joshua Ferris talked about technology in their latest work and in their own lives.
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MariNaomi, Dragon's Breath and Other True Stories
Dragon's Breath and Other True Stories by MariNaomi is a graphic memoir that explores the relationships and episodes in the author’s life, all in a simply drawn style. Many of the vignettes were first published on the online magazine The Rumpus as the series, “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes.”
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Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven
In this spellbinding novel, a pandemic kills off most of the population of North America. Among the few who remain are the members of a symphony orchestra who double as a Shakespeare troupe. The novel tracks their wanderings in the post-apocalyptic world, with glances back in time at how they got there.
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Karen Abbott, Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy
Belle Boyd, Emma Edmonds, Rose O’Neal Greenhow and Elizabeth Van Lew were four women who refused to stay behind the scenes during the Civil War. Each took matters into her own hands, creating lesser-known but fascinating chapters in that war. Author Karen Abbott uncovered the women’s stories and weaves them together in this novelistic account.
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Mira Jacob, The Sleepwalker's Guide to Dancing
This ambitious epic novel follows the Indian-American Eapen family as they build a life in the southwest US, guide their children as best they can, and maintain their connection to family back in India.
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Maya Lang, The Sixteenth of June
June 16th is the date of the Portmans’ annual Bloomsday party, and nothing -- not even the funeral of Grandma Portman that same morning -- is going to stop them. Maya Lang’s debut novel, The Sixteenth of June, takes place entirely on that day. It tracks the Portman sons, Stephen and Leopold, as well as Leo’s fiancee Nora, as they respectively try to break free from the stasis that their twenties have brought them.
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Will Chancellor, A Brave Man Seven Storeys Tall
When college water polo star Owen Burr gets injured during a match and loses his chance to compete in the Olympics, he heads to Berlin to become an artist. Back in the US, his professor father has lost track of Owen and sets off on a speaking tour to try to find him. From there, father and son manage to stay several steps away from each other in this riveting novel.
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Jennifer Hillier, The Butcher
After Chief of Police Edward Shank took down the serial killer known as The Butcher, he was lauded as a hero. Until more bodies started showing up and it became clear that The Butcher was still at large. Jennifer Hiller's twisty thriller The Butcher will keep you turning pages, hungry to know what's going to happen next.
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Megan Abbott, The Fever
When a group of high school girls come down with a mysterious illness, their teachers, parents and friends are sent into a frenzied panic.
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Michelle Huneven, Off Course
Cressida Hartley has moved from Los Angeles to her parents’ mountain cabin to finish her economics dissertation. While there, she falls into some relationships with men that conveniently keep her from her work. The novel traces her time in the mountains -- how she manages as an outsider and what she decides will be her next move.
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Maggie Shipstead, Astonish Me
This peek into the intense world of professional ballet combines a large, sweeping plot with finely wrought characters. Shipstead's first novel won the LATimes Prize for First Fiction, and she's created another beautiful work with this novel.
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Porochista Khakpour, The Last Illusion
Zal is a light-skinned Iranian boy whose disturbed mother kept him in a cage throughout his childhood. He is adopted by a kind man at age 10 and brought to the US. The Last Illusion traces Zal’s life afterward, and the lingering effects of his bizarre upbringing.
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Evan Fallenberg, When We Danced on Water
Teo Levin is a top dancer and choreographer working with the Tel Aviv Ballet but thinking about wrapping up his career when he meets Vivi, a waitress in the coffee shop he frequents. An artist somewhat adrift in her own life, Vivi nonetheless makes a connection with Teo and they manage to rekindle in each other their love not only for their respective arts, but for life itself.
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Stacey D'Erasmo, Wonderland
Anna Brundage was an indie singer-songwriter sensation who fell off the music world’s radar screen. Seven years later, she’s back on tour. Will she rise again?
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Ava Chin, Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love and the Perfect Meal
Chin describes how her childhood in Queens, New York, as the grandchild of loving Chinese grandparents led her to become the New York Times's "Urban Forager."
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Julia Fierro and Miranda Beverly-Whittemore at Greenlight Bookstore
Julia Fierro, author of CUTTING TEETH and Miranda Beverly-Whittemore, author of BITTERSWEET, talk with Cary Barbor about their novels, writing, parenting and more. This conversation took place live at Greenlight Bookstore in Brooklyn, New York.
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Roxane Gay, An Untamed State
Mireille Duval Jameson is visiting her native Haiti with her husband and infant son when she is kidnapped from in front of her parents’ home. She’s repeatedly beaten and sexually assaulted by her captors, who resent her family’s wealth in that very poor country. The novel follows Mireille as she waits for her father to pay the ransom, which he refuses to do, and traces the changes that her kidnapping brings about in her life.
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Mona Simpson, Casebook
Miles Adler-Hart and his best friend Hector are young boys who spend a lot of time spying on Miles’s mother, in the hope that they will understand what's going on in the family. But like many young sleuths, they end up learning things they really didn’t want to.
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Katherine Bucknell, +1
Main Line Philadelphia wife and mother Alice Gregory discovers she needs her first pair of reading glasses to aid her middle-aged eyes. When she puts them on, she finds an entirely new perspective on life, and as this novel progresses, Alice’s husband borrows the glasses and gets a new outlook too.
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Leslie Jamison, The Empathy Exams
This essay collection explores how we feel pain -- our own and that of others. The author describes attending a conference for a bizarre, niche disease; playing a sick patient to help assess a doctor’s empathy; observing poverty tourism, and other offbeat experiences that allow her to comment on human behavior. Winner of the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize.
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Maud Casey, The Man Who Walked Away
The Man Who Walked Away follows Albert, who walks, in a trance-like state, all over France and eventually all over Europe. He’s denigrated as a mad man, ridiculed, thrown into prison. There’s very little help for him until he finds a doctor who eventually starts to help him. The book is based on a true story, and takes us back to a time when mental health problems were little understood. For more, go to bksandauthors.com.
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Nicholas Montemarano, The Book of Why
In The Book of Why, an acclaimed self-help writer named Eric Newborn has given up his career and is living in self-imposed exile on Martha’s Vineyard. One day a stranger knocks on his door, and she unspools a string of discoveries in both their lives.
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Kevin Cook, Kitty Genovese: The Murder, The Bystanders, The Crime That Changed America
In March of 1964, 27-year-old Catherine Genovese, known as Kitty, was sexually assaulted and murdered in her quiet neighborhood in Queens, New York. The case became famous for illustrating the so-called “bystander effect,” the idea that people in urban settings don’t want to get involved in other people’s troubles, and besides, they figure, someone else must have called for help by now. This new book, though, unearths some different facts. Win a signed copy of this book! Email cary@bksandauthors.com for a chance.
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Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker, Busted
Two intrepid reporters from the Philadelphia Daily News root out widespread police corruption in this true story that reads like the best crime novel.
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Cari Luna, The Revolution of Every Day
Explore the world of the Lower East Side tenements in the 1990s and the squatters who claimed them in this riveting novel.
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Kenneth Bonert, The Lion Seeker
The Lion Seeker is a sprawling coming of age story in which Isaac Helger, the son of Jewish immigrants, makes his way in Johannesburg, South Africa, as World War II looms.
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Kim Fu, For Today I Am A Boy
Kim Fu, For Today I Am A Boy by Books & Authors
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Victoria Patterson, The Peerless Four
The Peerless Four explores the world of female athletes in the 1920s as they strive to compete in the Olympics. It’s a look back on the rights of women at the time. And it’s also a fascinating view into the world of world-class athletes and what they give up -- and gain -- in practicing their sport at the highest level.
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Laura Hemphill, Buying In
BUYING IN tells the story of Sophie Landgraf, a recent college graduate in her first job as a Wall Street analyst. Sophie makes some missteps as well as some smart moves as she learns the ways of the brutal business she has signed on for.
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Beverly Gologorsky, Stop Here
In Stop Here, three women friends work together at Murray’s Diner on Long Island. The present-day war in Iraq and the decades-old war in Vietnam weigh heavily on all their lives, and the novel explores how they support each other and make their way through the challenges that come at them every day.
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Kevin Sampsell, This is Between Us
This is Between Us looks at an intense 5-year relationship from inside the heart and soul of the man and woman involved.
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Galen Guengerich, God Revised: How Religion Must Evolve in a Scientific Age
As our knowledge of science grows, Americans’ participation in religious life dwindles. Reverend Geungerich, senior minister at New York City’s All Souls Unitarian church, argues for an evolved concept of God, to meet contemporary needs.
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Jonathan Miles, Want Not
Jonathan Miles's insightful new novel WANT NOT explores waste, our consumer culture and all its excesses, and what we choose to throw away and to keep.
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Lisa Gornick, Tinderbox
In this new novel by Lisa Gornick, Myra, a Manhattan psychotherapist, has an orderly life. She’s raised her kids and gotten rid of her cheating husband. She has herself and her patients to care for. But then her son moves back in, bringing his wife and young child. Myra hires them a nanny, thinking it will help maintain order. But it does just the opposite.
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Lisa Scottoline, Accused
A young girl tries to find her sister's true killer, as she exonerates a man wrongly convicted. A new mystery in the Rosato & Associates series, from Edgar Award winning, New York Times bestselling author Lisa Scottoline.
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J. Robert Lennon, HappyLand
In this dark and thoroughly entertaining satire, doll company mogul Happy Masters sets about remodeling Equinox, NY, into HappyLand, a sort of amusement park-slash- tourist destination for fans of her dolls.
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Katy Butler, Knocking on Heaven's Door
Part memoir and part keen investigative journalism, Knocking on Heaven’s Door traces the journey through the death of Katy's Butler's parents and at the same time, through the heartbreaking rabbit hole of the American medical system.
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Ben Dolnick, At the Bottom of Everything
Adam and Thomas were best friends as adolescents until a prank took a tragic turn, and they went their separate ways. Now Thomas’s parents are calling for Adam’s help in reaching out to the troubled Thomas. At the Bottom of Everything traces the journey that brings the two back together, to reckon with their past.
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Ethan Hauser, The Measures Between Us
This beautiful novel traces the ways we are all connected with one another.
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Amy Grace Lloyd, The Affairs of Others
Celia is the young and recently widowed landlord of a house full of apartments in Brooklyn. She carefully selects her tenants to ensure herself a quiet and isolated domestic life. But when beautiful, charismatic Hope arrives in the building, things start to change.
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Iris Smyles, Iris Has Free Time
Iris Smyles the writer follows a character called Iris Smyles through the awkward stage between adolescence and adulthood in this engaging and entertaining novel.
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Mitchell Jackson, The Residue Years
Mitchell Jackson, The Residue Years by Books & Authors
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Mark Slouka, Brewster
Brewster is an intense, beautiful novel about friendship and loyalty. Two teenage boys forge a tight friendship in upstate New York in the 1960s, against a soundtrack of The Beatles, Stones, Bob Dylan, Woodstock and Kent State. I talk with author Mark Slouka here.
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Katherine Hill, The Violet Hour
A family living "the American Dream" falls apart, and goes on to deal with the consequences.
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Koethi Zan, The Never List
August's beach read! I couldn't put down this plot-twisting psychological thriller. It traces the scars left on a young woman held in captivity.
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J. Courtney Sullivan, The Engagements
Bestselling author Courtney Sullivan’s latest is a novel about marriage in its many forms. The sprawling story also weaves in a history of diamonds, and how they came to symbolize hope and love in our culture.
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Ivy Pochoda, Visitation Street
Summer in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and two teen girls go missing. Dennis Lehane picked this riveting book for his imprint.
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Lea Carpenter, Eleven Days
A single mother awaits word on her Navy SEAL son, missing in action, in this beautiful debut novel.
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Mary Simses, The Irresistible Blueberry Bakeshop & Cafe
A Manhattan lawyer travels to Maine to fulfill her grandmother's dying wish. What she finds there changes her life dramatically.
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Stephen Grosz, The Examined Life
A psychoanalyst takes us through 31 vignettes that read like the finest fiction, to discover why we do the things we do.
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Alexandra Horowitz, Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes
"You don't have to do any special flexing of a muscle to pay attention, you just have to look at something in a new way," says Alexandra Horowitz, about her book On Looking: Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes. I talk about observations and gaining new perspectives with the author of Inside of a Dog, here.
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Liz Rosenberg, The Laws of Gravity
What would -- and wouldn't -- you do for family? Rosenberg explores that and more in this gripping novel.
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Lindy DeKoven, Primetime Princess
First beach read of the summer! The author is a former top exec at NBC-TV, and she talks with Cary about what goes on behind the scenes in the world of entertainment.
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A.M. Homes, May We Be Forgiven
No one is as insightful and incisive as A.M. Homes when it comes to human relationships. Listen in as she talks about her newest novel.
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Jonathan Schuppe, A Chance to Win
A drug dealer, shot and paralyzed, decides to turn his life around by coaching a Little League team in inner city Newark, NJ. A Pulitzer-Prize winning reporter tells the gripping, heartbreaking, hopeful story.
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Nadeem Aslam, The Blind Man's Garden
Two foster brothers leave Pakistan to help the injured in Afghanistan just after 9/11, in Aslam's exquisite new novel.
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Brian Kimberling, Snapper
“In Indiana, material just walks up to me in the street and starts talking.” Hear Brian Kimberling talk about the richness of his home state, why people love birdwatching, and more.
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Brian Stelter, Top of the Morning
New York Times media reporter Brian Stelter talks morning TV, where news coverage is headed, and why he loves Twitter.
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Nathan Englander, What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank
Nathan Englander is deeply intelligent, thoughtful and candid in this interview about his latest short story collection. In the title story, two Jewish couples discuss who would hide them in the case of a second holocaust.
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Evelyn Resh, Women, Sex, Power & Pleasure
Sexuality counselor Evelyn Resh discusses how we can have more pleasure in our sex lives and our lives in general.
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Allison Amend, A Nearly Perfect Copy
A talented artist toys with forgery; a grieving mother considers cloning her lost son. What is authentic and what is not? The terrific novel A Nearly Perfect Copy explores this theme.
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Jennifer Close, The Smart One
Jennifer Close joins us to talk about sibling rivalry, family love and frustration, and moving home with Mom and Dad. They're all covered in her new novel, The Smart One.
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Susan Freinkel, Plastic: A Toxic Love Story
How did we get so enmeshed with plastic? Journalist Susan Freinkel investigates, and discusses what she found.
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David Abrams, Fobbit
David Abrams, an Iraq war veteran, talks about his comic novel Fobbit, which explores the soldiers who stay behind in the office.
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Junot Diaz, This is How You Lose Her
Winner of a Pulitzer Prize and a MacArthur "genius" grant Junot Diaz discusses his new short-story collection, This is How You Lose Her. talks about what it means to be American, why girls learn responsibility first, writing in the second person, and more.
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Antoine Wilson on BookTalk
Antoine Wilson discusses his terrific novel Panorama City. In it we follow Oppen Porter, a winning but odd naif who sets out to become a man of the world.
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